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  • >> Hey everyone. Happy holidays.

  • Thank you for coming.

  • I know some of you are actually on

  • holiday as of like a few days ago.

  • So, I appreciate you coming back to show

  • up to listen to a dear friend of mine,

  • family friend, Reverend Taka Kawakami,

  • who, I'll let him explain his background himself.

  • I'm Anna, I'm one of the General Managers and partners here

  • running the AI research in Bing Studio,

  • and we hold a monthly series called Fireside Chats.

  • This is our third series,

  • actually it's like 2.5.

  • It's like we've had two this month already.

  • I just want to welcome you all and say thank you for showing up,

  • and I'm going to hand it over to Taka now.

  • So, thank you.

  • >> Well, thank you so much. Will you give me a hug?

  • Well, thank you so much for another introduction,

  • but also give me this opportunity here.

  • So, I'm Taka.

  • Do I need to talk of my background anyway?

  • >> Yeah.

  • >> Okay. All right.

  • So, I am a Deputy Head Priest at Temple Shunkoin Temple.

  • I am actually wearing T-shirts for that one.

  • Actually, I'm priest, I'm Zen priest.

  • Normally when I'm working in Temple,

  • I wear this robe here.

  • I teach Zen Buddhism,

  • Philosophy, but also Mindfulness,

  • and recently working on the Innovation, something like that.

  • I work with many startup company in Shinjuku or Gotanda.

  • That spot in Tokyo,

  • there are many startup business there.

  • At first I was wearing a robe

  • when I started going there to

  • give a workshop, something like this.

  • Many people were wearing this logo t-shirts anyway,

  • so I started wearing this one too.

  • So, that's what I do.

  • Then maybe, the last few years,

  • especially teaching in some of universities in US,

  • like this February I was leading a workshop at Brown University,

  • and also MIT, something like that.

  • Probably some of you are from there too.

  • So, mostly that's what I do.

  • Then, today's case, I saw the topics there, the mindfulness too,

  • but actually many people,

  • probably already done the meditation mindfulness before.

  • All right, that's good, thanks.

  • Many people have done meditations,

  • probably, because mindfulness I think has faded,

  • especially this tech industry right now.

  • But issue there is they don't really

  • teach about philosophical part.

  • I think that's an issue,

  • because if you're practicing meditation just

  • for the stress reduction or a way to develop your performance,

  • in a way, in a way you're just using meditation as a pain killer.

  • In a way, the cosmetic drug.

  • As you know the pain killer doesn't actually treat wounds,

  • or disease, or anything, all right.

  • It doesn't heal your wounds,

  • disease, anything like that.

  • So, we need to go a step farther.

  • Then that's why I start

  • talking about actuality and reality, in a way.

  • I should use this one to search topics.

  • But anyone can tell the difference between actuality and reality.

  • Anyone up in there and Skype too,

  • that anyone can tell the difference.

  • actuality and reality.

  • I know that if you go to the dictionary, regular dictionary,

  • Webster, whatever, its synonyms.

  • But this one here actually quite important for this.

  • Just practicing mindfulness, well,

  • actually Zen Buddhism or Buddhism in general,

  • but also this is an important concept for the innovation too.

  • Actuality and reality.

  • Anyone? Don't be shy.

  • >> Perception.

  • >> Others say perception versus the moment.

  • >> That's right.

  • >> Like, actuality is perception,

  • and then reality is what's actually happened.

  • >> Actually it's opposite.

  • But, yeah, that's close enough in a way.

  • We have actually a good example later,

  • but actuality and reality.

  • Actuality is something actually exist,

  • but reality only exist here.

  • So, it's really about perception in a way that

  • reality based on what you perceive from actuality.

  • But we normally don't

  • differentiate because we have a naive realism in a way.

  • I want to try some game actually.

  • So, in a way we are going to talk about this one here,

  • but in order to

  • actually understand difference between reality and actuality,

  • we need to understand about our own patterns.

  • Belief that you created unconsciously,

  • or some embodied movement or pattern, something like this.

  • So, we're going to play this game.

  • Rock-Paper-Scissors, everybody knows.

  • I assume that you know this is a multinational company.

  • It's interesting. I teach this one in

  • my meditation class at my Temple.

  • I have actually, people coming from different countries.

  • This simple game here,

  • but everybody have different rules.

  • Well, as you see,

  • these are basic rules here. Lets see.

  • Don't be shy everybody, find your partner.

  • Let's make a group of two,

  • preferably somebody you don't normally talk.

  • Somebody you don't know. Somebody you've

  • never talked even you actually- I mean,

  • this is a huge company in a way.

  • I can see that many

  • of the people around here never talk, never seen that.

  • Okay, you can now find

  • a partner and maybe kind of partner. So, group of two.

  • Maybe we find a partner. All right.

  • So, first of all,

  • decide if you're going to be Person A and Person B.

  • Decide if you're going to be Person A and Person B.

  • Can you decide it? All right.

  • Then Person A just plays the game as usual, the normal rule,

  • but Person B you need to throw

  • the hand second after the Person A throw their hand.

  • So, you can see what kind of hand your partner throw.

  • Then you see it, but you have to purposely lose.

  • You have to lose purposely.

  • So, you confirm their hand,

  • then you throw your hand and you lose.

  • But not too long, okay?

  • Not too long. I mean,

  • like just a second later, all right?

  • Then play this one five times each,

  • and then I'm going to ask you after everybody play this game,

  • I'm going to ask you how many times you could lose,

  • you can lose, okay?

  • >> Because if you think about [inaudible].

  • >> Okay. You got the rule?

  • >> Yeah.

  • >> Everything clear?

  • >> Yeah.

  • >> All right. So.

  • All right. You have

  • to loose, you can not win.

  • Okay? So, five times eight,

  • all right? Five times eight.

  • How was it? Tricky, right?

  • Challenging. All right, everybody finished or not yet?

  • Do you a couple of minutes?

  • Couple more minutes, are you done?

  • >> That was hard.

  • >> So, first of all,

  • anyone who loose five times? That's amazing.

  • Four times? Three times?

  • Twice? Once? Zero? So, how was it?

  • >> It's was hard.

  • >> It's hard isn't it? It's just slight change.

  • You just need to,

  • is that my voice echoing or somebody is talking?

  • Okay. So, anyway, it's

  • easy game that just on one change, just losing, right.

  • >> For all of you that are remote,

  • can you please mute your sites. Thank you.

  • >> Okay. Thank you. But anyway,

  • so it's just a really easy game

  • that it's really hard to lose in a way because,

  • it's not like you actually practice this one so many time,

  • in a way, you just need to play this game again and again.

  • So, you actually know that,

  • you program yourself to win this game.

  • But, you try to change approach and it's really hard.

  • This is a silly game that

  • many things in your life probably find that it's similar where

  • you actually learn to

  • do something and you can still embody the skills or patterns.

  • You develop certain patterns.

  • But, when I ask you to change it's really hard.

  • So, then this one here.

  • So, this one here,

  • when you actually make these patterns,

  • normally we call this one belief, right?

  • When we create the belief,

  • first of all, let me ask you this one.

  • How many people think that you are more rational than people who

  • lived before late 18th century?

  • Define that time, we reason why it's

  • late 18th century normally

  • defined as the beginning of the modern science.

  • So, that's why I'm asking you,

  • how many people think that you are more rational than people

  • before the late 18th century?

  • Why?

  • Why do you think you are more rational?

  • >> They didn't second get themselves with science.

  • >> Science? I want to talk

  • about that one today. That's my topic today.

  • Science, right. Then, what is science?

  • You need more logic?

  • >> It's a method for understanding things that are in this.

  • >> Okay. But, what do you think,

  • how about people before the modern science was established?

  • What they used to understand what's going on around them?

  • >> Observation.

  • >> Observation.

  • >> Mythology.

  • >> Mythology.

  • >> Traditions.

  • >> Right.

  • >> Story.

  • >> Story.

  • >> Guess.

  • >> Guess, that's good.

  • But, we still use a guess.

  • But anyway, so this one here for instance,

  • how we develop our belief that belief it's

  • not part of faith or religion, I mean,

  • everyday in life too, you do

  • certain thing and you have belief that that's happened,

  • if you do A certainly B happen, that's a belief.

  • You have a certain routines or things that you do in everyday.

  • That's also a belief.

  • But normally, the reason why I ask you this one here

  • is why do you think you are more

  • rational than people who lived before.

  • Then, this case here,

  • which one comes first?

  • Reasoning or judgment, which one comes first?

  • You say rational, right?

  • You're more rational than people who

  • lived before the modern science was established.

  • So, people will say that you are more rational,

  • which one comes first? Reasoning or judgment?

  • >> Judgment.

  • >> Judgment. But in that case,

  • it's not really irrational, isn't it?

  • What do you think? If your judgment

  • comes first and then reasoning second,

  • doesn't sound rational to me.

  • >> You question.

  • >> Then normally sometime people say,

  • "Oh, reasoning comes first then judgment comes second."

  • But, what do you see here?

  • So, intuition, so judgment, right? The reasoning.

  • But, this reasoning here is not you're being a scientist in a way.

  • So, you've been just about lawyer to yourself.

  • You see the difference? Lawyer and the scientist difference.

  • So, lawyers case, they try to defend the client, right?

  • Scientists case, they try to find truth.

  • Then this kind of reasoning here,

  • this path here you have a judgment intuition this happened.

  • Reasoning here is normally we try to

  • justify our intuitional judgment.

  • Then, if this one here