Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • quick disclaimer.

  • Before we jump into this video, I want to recognize the insane amount of privilege I've had.

  • Somebody who grew up in a middle class family went to a college of her choice.

  • And now, by some insane stroke of luck, it's paid full time to make YouTube videos.

  • There are people who work 10 times harder than me who will never be afforded the same opportunities.

  • And frankly, I feel guilty as hell for the money that I have right now.

  • But I also want to be proud of myself, empower you guys in your own career and have an honest conversation about money.

  • So here, that is, Please don't hate me.

  • Hello and welcome to a video literally nobody asked me to make.

  • I'm going to be talking about how I make that red as they come out Jaws, money, running, a business, budgeting, getting that good, good cinnamon toast, crunch coin and also literally making bread.

  • I'm gonna pick Rose very sick Austin today while I talk because I'm no puns so so red.

  • Like any career starts off as a little yeasty fungus that, if you sew it properly, will turn into a poofy bread of financial success.

  • I tried so to start out our bread on combining some warm water and two teaspoons of sugar in order to, uh, give our guest a nice little wake up call and say hello, Mrs.

  • Going badly already.

  • We're gonna let that marinate for five minutes, and in the meantime, let's talk about first jobs.

  • So I started working right when I was 16 and I remember I was so excited.

  • The day I turned 16 I wanted to get a job.

  • First of all, that wasn't that much to do with my hometown, so I figured I might as well spend it.

  • We're getting second of all.

  • I played a lot of Harvest Moon and Animal Crossing growing up, so I always just saw working and like, saving money as this type of game.

  • Nothing like a wolf of Wall Street way.

  • But just in a I wanted to put in the work and see the numbers growing my bank account be able to save up money at an early age, So I worked a lot in high school.

  • I worked at American Eagle and a local ice cream store were my first jobs, layer in high school.

  • I also worked at the gap at a pizza and ice cream store.

  • I don't know why it was both pizza and ice cream.

  • That's not really a classic combination, But that suburban Maryland, Floria and I also worked as an s a T tutor.

  • No matter your economic situation, I would really recommend everybody work a service job at one point in their life because it just makes you a lot less of an asshole.

  • Okay, My niece was supposed to be foamy at this point.

  • Oh, no, I don't think I made the water warm enough.

  • So pull.

  • I'm gonna read you my picture.

  • You are my kids and what you should look for in, ah, first job or Joel, but you're working while you're in school.

  • Firstly, adult that pays tips or commission so you can actually increase your rage is by working harder.

  • Secondly, a job that gives you the opportunity to kind of just sit around and do your homework.

  • It's not glamorous, but if you're in school, that's the perfect way to balance having a job and having studying and homework to dio.

  • Thirdly, a job that you actually like the people in other pretty early on that dearly, any job is bearable if you have really fun co workers and a chill manager, fourthly, a job that requires minimal commute time and that also doesn't require you to get super dressed up and ready, always considering your wages in terms of the total time that it takes you to get to work, to get ready for work.

  • For example, if a job pays you $10 per hour, but then it takes you half an hour to drive there half an hour to drive back and also half an hour to get ready for four hour shift.

  • You're really earning much less than $10 per hour because you put in all that extra time, so it might actually be a better choice to take a job that's five minutes away from you.

  • That's 9 50 an hour that really doesn't require you to get dressed up, and then you're actually earning more for your time.

  • If that makes sense and 50 a drop that gives you a consistent schedule and that schedules you often, this was a problem I encountered in high school when I had jobs that required me to stay available for like 20 hours per week, but only would schedule me for 4 to 8 hours.

  • American Eagle.

  • So at one point I was working for different jobs just so I could work 20 to 30 hours per week, which was so stressful.

  • So if you can find a job that just gives you the same 2030 hours per week and gives you a consistent schedule, it'll give you so much more control over your life.

  • Economic fun fat in case you guys want.

  • This phenomenon is actually called the great risk shift we're in.

  • Over the past 50 years or so, companies have shifted the risk of fluctuating business from themselves onto their workers.

  • For example, like back in the fifties, you would have the same 40 hour work week every single week as a store clerk, no matter how much business stored on you're gonna get the same hours.

  • And the business would have to front the cost of being overstaffed if they weren't busy.

  • But now nearly every business employs the workers on a fluctuating schedule, so you have to be available for like 40 hours a week.

  • They might schedule you for as little as four hours.

  • They might schedule you up to 20 hours, and it could change every single week, Which was frustrating when I was in high school.

  • But imagine if you are like a single parent.

  • If you are fully reliant on incomes from fluctuating jobs like that, and you need to take a bus across town, you need to book a nanny that is insanely stressful.

  • This is a really big problem that people need to talk about along with raising minimum wage is also giving workers consistent schedules that they could build their life around.

  • Okay, back to cooking.

  • Athlete hope that was educational.

  • A lot of you guys asked me how I balanced school and work at the same time, and it really comes down to managing your time effectively.

  • This is my actual planner from high school.

  • As you tell like I had a lot of pent up aggression.

  • Nine years life take out on scribbling out text in my planner.

  • But all my homework assignments were in black.

  • All my due dates were in red and then all of my work shifts from my various jobs were in purple.

  • Having a plan was like the most basic strategy for organizing your life.

  • But it really did help me keep track of all the craziness that was going on.

  • I would do my homework on the bus on my way to work.

  • I would do them at my dolls when they allowed it.

  • Even the jobs that technically didn't allow me to do homework, I would get a napkin and I would write out all of my, like, study terms, key vocabulary.

  • And I would just like from memory study old my courses while I was at work.

  • And don't ever call me for that cause I just thought I was like doodling on a napkin when in reality, I'm getting shit done.

  • But also remember, it is all about balance.

  • At the end of the day, you're only in high school or college ones.

  • You really have to give yourself the time to get the good grades, to get the quality education that you're paying for it, just like enjoy being young.

  • I guess I felt like such an old person.

  • I'm 21 but like, enjoy school.

  • Will it last kids?

  • Because once you graduated, I don't know what the fuck is happening.

  • Time to bust out the Costco sized olive oil.

  • We're gonna get 1/4 of that.

  • Okay, while I am stirring up this dough, baby, let's talk about some signs.

  • Cycles was a friendly word, but I have liked kind of selling things on the side, not drugs, I guess.

  • Technically, the first way that I earned money was Crow Shay's little stuffed animals.

  • And then I would sell them and my local like art gallery.

  • They had a little gift shop.

  • They took a 30% cut, and the night are like $10 for a little approach.

  • A animal.

  • I also sold art prints on Etsy for awhile.

  • In retrospect, I had a bit of a weird business model because I did charcoal drawings of celebrities.

  • Why does somebody need my drawing of Beyonce, like in their room?

  • I'm not really sure, but I sold a couple of those.

  • There was this very kind lady from Minnesota who hired need to draw her Children for her.

  • So I did like portrait room for along the summer.

  • After my senior year in high school, I started a company called Chokers and Company.

  • Yes, I know that sounds like a dominatrix thing, but it was literally just be selling handmade velvet chokers.

  • I sold them on pockmark and deep off, which are both reselling abs.

  • I also sold them on Etsy and, yeah, like $1000 that summer.

  • Just selling chokers, which I remember being very, very proud of how another one is drifting and reselling clothing.

  • I started, I think, when I was 16 just re selling my used clothing on Posh Mark and that evolved a couple years down the line into me thrift in clothing or sewing and altering clothing and then selling that.

  • And that's still something that I do.

  • To this day.

  • I have a little website.

  • None of those businesses ever made me like Richie Rich.

  • They never made me a ton of money, but it was a really good way to earn some extra money on the side.

  • I also taught me a lot of the basics of running a business like how to market how to keep inventory, how to turn around all of my product in a certain amount of time and ship it out.

  • There's also something great about working for yourself and being able to build something for yourself.

  • And like, who knows?

  • If you start a little small business now, it could be your full time job in a couple of years.

  • All right, here is how our doe was looking.

  • It's Michael Sticky Dough, baby.

  • So I'm gonna take it out of the pool.

  • Apparently are supposed to shake this into a ball.

  • Okay, I think we need a little more flowers.

  • Okay?

  • You're supposed to grease the bowl with some olive oil, and then we're gonna pop her baby back in the bowl, left the rest for 45 60 minutes in a warm place, and chilled dough has nearly doubled in size.

  • I'm gonna put this near my feet, or so it gets nice and toasty, but I'll be right back.

  • And now we have 45 minutes to talk.

  • So call yourself a free spirit.

  • Why work as a freelance videographer and sausage throughout my college years?

  • My number one tip for freelancing?

  • Know how much you are?

  • Worse.

  • I think this is advice everybody gives.

  • But it was never something that I took the heart because I was always like, Oh, I'm young.

  • I'm a film student, especially.

  • Is somebody who had worked for minimum wage for so long.

  • I always framed it in terms off.

  • I like freelancing.

  • I work for minimum wage.

  • Therefore, when I feel and I should be paid approximately minimum wage for less, because it's something I enjoy and honestly, that works to get your foot in the door.

  • But at a certain point, you have to really assert how much you know that your work.

  • For example, my first gig, when I was in college, I charged $400 two huge direct and add it to full music videos in my 18 year old brain.

  • I was like, I'm making big and I get to direct a music video that's so cool.

  • But at the same time, I put probably like 80 hours of work into those projects, so I was earning $5 an hour.

  • But I should at least have been paying myself, like 10 $15 an hour.

  • And in retrospect, the guy would have paid me a lot more.

  • But I just asked for $400 he was like when I started working for the sorry girls, they asked me what my great for video was.

  • I said $150 at one video.

  • It took me a couple of months to work up the courage to ask for a raise.

  • Now, this is the first race I have ever asked for my life, and I was fucking terrified.

  • They didn't give me the full amount that I asked for, but they did raise me 2 $225.

  • And just in one email, I was earning $75 more for video.

  • All I had to do was ask for it later.

  • I got dinner with them and they said, Hey, actually, we know that you asked for this raise a couple months ago.

  • You've been doing a really good job.

  • We will pay you the full amount asked for.

  • So that was a kidney lesson for me and not being afraid to ask for a little bit more and realizing like you have skills that are worth money to people.

  • That summer, I got an email from an interior designer in Seattle who had washed my YouTube videos, and she said she really liked my editing style, and she wanted to know if I could edit Home Tour for her was edited that video.

  • She actually liked it so much that she flew me up to Seattle.

  • She paid me $100 an hour to shoot videos for her.

  • And I have, like five more videos to edit for her for that same rate.

  • So it turned out really well.

  • She was happy with The service is, and I was really happy with my right.

  • For once, this is to say, Obviously do not go out is like an amateur in charge, like five times the going rate for wedding photography or something like that.

  • No your skills, But also know that once you develop that skill set, people are willing to pay for it.

  • Last thing for freelancing that also helped me out.

  • What's having my website?

  • I designed one on square space.

  • This is not sponsored by them, but I did a little portfolio website so that I had something that looked really professional.

  • To direct people to you would be like he knows what she's doing later, Our breath is looking nice and healthy and well fit.

  • I'm gonna flower a baking sheet and shape the dough.

  • Throw back to my days, working at a pizza shop and my favorite part of that job was always being the dough girl.

  • And I would just like shape to go for five hours at a time.

  • It was actually really therapeutic and cheaper than therapy.

  • So I would be pretty much my current part of my financial story, which is now.

  • I work full time on YouTube.

  • Right now, I have a couple different revenue streams.

  • AdSense is my name one.

  • That's the abs that run before my videos accents around 50% off my total revenue pie, if you will.

  • Another 20% or so is affiliate links.

  • Those links that are in the description of my video.

  • So when you guys watch out video and you're interested in buying the piece of clothing, if you click on my links all earth like 123% of the final sale.

  • So thank you guys for cooking on my legs.

  • I really get it.

  • And then the remaining 30% or so of my income comes from sponsorships.

  • You guys have seen sponsorships.

  • You know what they are Basically a brand like you want make you talk about us in your video and then I talk about them in my video.

  • By the way, this is covered in plastic wrap.

  • Now it's in arise for another 20 minutes.

  • So it gets extra fluffy and the least has more time to, uh, to do its thing.

  • I forget the science behind all this.

  • Speaking of sponsorships, though, I am actually going to take a break from YouTube.

  • Sponsorships.

  • I'm not gonna do any this entire summer.

  • I'm gonna see how it goes.

  • I've always just hated, and I feel so guilty putting an ad in a video.

  • You guys have done so much to support me, and then I'm gonna take another two minutes out of your day to talk about a product, even if it's something that I really love.

  • And I think you guys should use.

  • I don't want to lose the trust between me and you.

  • I don't want to lose, like the honesty that's there and the creative freedom that I have.

  • And I feel like I've been giving that up to brands, you know, to be honest, like brand rates are fucking dang, I could be making bank right now, but I don't I want to.

  • If it comes at that cost in nearly every other career.

  • Earning more money is associated with doing a better job.

  • Like if you're working really hard as I don't know, like an engineer, you get a raise because you did a good job and you help people out.

  • But as a youtuber, if I do take sponsorships, I'm earning more money.

  • Not because I'm a better person, but because I'm more of a sell out, you know, because I, like sold more of your guys, is attention to a company rather than, like really pushing myself to make better videos.

  • I want to earn money in a way that I'm proud of.

  • I am constantly nervous that my lifetime on YouTube and on social media will burn out, and people will like me anymore.

  • And you know, that'll probably happen one day and I can't prevent it.

  • But the thing that I can do is not selling out while I have the chance.

  • And while I have your guiza's attention and your trust and a platform to say things, I want to be able to say exactly what I want to say and not anybody else's message, you know?

  • Yeah, it's gonna be really exciting.

  • Summer, no more YouTube sponsorships.

  • You can click on every video knowing that it's just me and all of my own opinions, which is really, really exciting to say other questions that I thought about you, too, for stuff.

  • I do have a manager.

  • His name is Alex, and he takes a 20% cut of my brand deals.

  • Having a manager on YouTube doesn't mean that you have somebody like telling you what videos to make and controlling your content.

  • It's really just somebody that you work alongside and now going forward.

  • Alice is putting less of his focus on brand deals and more focused on bigger, longer term projects that are like actually exciting and not like 15 hello, fresh deals.

  • I also have an accountant who I pay around $230 per month, and he takes care of all of my book keeping, regardless of whether your YouTube or not.

  • If you're self employed, it's a great idea to incorporate massively helpful for bookkeeping and tax season.

  • You know what is a business expense because you have a separate business account, a separate business card and what is a personal expense, and therefore at the end of the year.

  • You know what?

  • The taxable profit from your company is not shit, that they never teach you in school.

  • But they really should, because I had to figure it out all by myself.

  • I'm gonna poke little holes throughout the dough because I don't know, this is just how culture works.

  • Apparently and since it's Rosemary, If Akasha I got some rosemary Springs, I'm gonna put a little spring a Roni in each of the holes.

  • This is not the ideal cooking angle.

  • I'm quickly realized.