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  • - Brexit, it's all anyone in the UK is talking about right now. But what on earth is it,

  • and how does it work? Do you know what, I think it was best summed up by British actor

  • Danny Dyer, when he said this.

  • - So here it is guys, Brexit explained, in 13 words.

  • Welcome to Eat Sleep Dream English.

  • If you haven't met me before, my name is Tom, and I teach fresh, modern British English

  • so you can take your English to the next level, and achieve your life goals, whatever they

  • may be. Today, we're looking at Brexit, I'm gonna try and keep it short and simple, so

  • that we can understand it together. Brexit is a portmanteau. Which is when two words

  • combine to make one word. So we have Britain and exit, you put them together, Brexit. So

  • Brexit is the withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the EU. On the 23rd June 2016, we had

  • a referendum. 51.9% voted to leave the EU, and 48.1% voted to remain. There was a turnout

  • of over 70%, which equates to about 30 million people. Now let's just back up really quickly,

  • Britain is England, Scotland and Wales. And the United Kingdom is England, Scotland, Wales,

  • and Northern Ireland. Now when we say Brexit, Britain exit, we really are talking about

  • the United Kingdom. The EU, or European Union, is a political and economic union. Between

  • 28 countries, that collectively decide policies on trade, migration and security. Other countries

  • in the EU, are Germany, France, Spain, Italy etc. Article 50 is the clause in the 2007

  • Lisbon Treaty. That says that any member state can withdraw from the EU. Now article 50 was

  • triggered by Britain when it had its referendum in June 2016. Soon after the referendum, Theresa

  • May, the British Prime Minister coined this phrase.

  • - Brexit means Brexit.

  • - Brexit means Brexit, but what does that mean? It was her way of showing her determination

  • and pledge to the British people, that she would indeed take Britain out of the EU. Brexit

  • means Brexit. A Brexiteer, brexiteer, this is a noun. This is someone that is in favor

  • of leaving the European Union. High profile examples are Boris Johnson, Jacob Rees-Mogg,

  • and Sir James Dyson. The transition period, is the period of time, between the day that

  • Britain officially leaves the EU, which is scheduled to be the 29th of March, 2019, although

  • that could change. Until all the agreements kick in. So that's expected to be about two

  • years, so December 2020. So this timeline may change, depending on negotiations between

  • the British government and the European Union. The single market allows free movement within

  • the EU. Of people, goods, services, and money. It's as if the EU is like one country. There

  • are no obstacles, you can move freely within it's border. The customs union allows members

  • of the EU, plus Turkey, San Marino, Andorra, and Monaco to trade together, without any

  • tariffs or taxes. And at the same time, they all collectively have to charge the same tariffs

  • on imports from outside the EU. The British government and the European Union have been

  • negotiating this agreement, for two years now. It's almost like a divorce. If you imagine

  • a couple divorcing, and they have to agree on how it works. Who gets to keep the house,

  • who gets to keep the car etc. It's kind of like that. There are different types of Brexit.

  • We have a hard Brexit, soft Brexit, and no deal Brexit. Now let's go through those. So

  • let's start with the hard Brexit. What does that mean? A hard Brexit will see Britain

  • cut its ties completely with the European Union. That means leaving the customs union,

  • and the single market, as well as many other things. It will therefore give Britain control

  • of its own borders, and its own trade agreement. And this is what Brexiteers call taking back

  • control. A soft Brexit is slightly different. Now it doesn't have an official definition,

  • and it can come in different shapes and sizes. But, depending on the negotiations and the

  • agreement. Britain could remain in some institutions. Like the customs union or the single market.

  • Now the idea of a soft Brexit is obviously not very popular with Brexiteers, who see

  • this as a betrayal of the referendum, and as essentially, not really leaving the EU.

  • Now a no deal is perhaps the option that nobody wants. This is of course, as it says, where

  • we can't reach an agreement. The British government and the European Union cannot reach an agreement,

  • and so Britain immediately leaves the European Union. There's no transition period, there

  • are hard borders that go up immediately, and new trade agreements will have to be arranged.

  • Now as it stands, EU citizens that are living in Britain, are free to remain here, but,

  • it's not so clear about Britons who are living abroad. Will they be allowed to remain? We

  • don't know yet. Ah, the backstop. This is the slightly complicated one. The backstop

  • is essentially an insurance policy, demanded by the EU, that there is a soft border remaining

  • between Ireland, and Northern Ireland. Now, let's back up a little bit here. Northern

  • Ireland is a part of the United Kingdom, and Ireland is an independent country. There is

  • a 300 mile border between the two countries that's been open for the last 20 years, thanks

  • to the good Friday agreement. There are no checks, there are no police, it's open. Now

  • that's only able to exist, because both Ireland and Britain are in the EU. So you can have

  • free movement of people and goods. But when Britain leaves the EU, there will need to

  • be a hard border to control the movement of people and goods. A hard border involves security

  • checks, police, things like that. Now this would be a huge problem if there was a hard

  • border, between Ireland and Northern Ireland. There are many historical and social reasons

  • for this. So, the backstop is a safety net, it's a temporary solution until a better solution,

  • or a deal can be agreed. Now it is a bit more complicated than that, now if you want to

  • go into depth, on this issue just type in what is the backstop, into Google, or into

  • YouTube, and you'll find political commentators who can give a much better definition than

  • I can. Okay, and the last term, the second referendum. Now of course we had the first

  • referendum in June 2016. And there are calls from some people to have a second referendum.

  • The idea here is that it's been so difficult to find an agreement, to agree on a Brexit

  • that everyone is happy with. That perhaps we should have a second referendum, that we

  • should go back to the people, and decide whether we still want to leave the European Union,

  • or not. Now of course, this is popular in some quarters. Not so popular in other places.

  • It's controversial, just like this whole thing is controversial. Brexiteers will tell you

  • that the people voted. In 2016, they chose to leave the EU, that was democracy in action.

  • People who support the second referendum, would say, well we didn't really understand

  • what we were voting for. No one knew what Brexit looked like. They didn't know, how

  • it would affect us economically, or socially, so now we know much more about Brexit. We

  • need another vote to determine if we still want to leave. It's complicated guys. I would

  • love you guys to share your thoughts, your opinions, in the comments below. What do you

  • think of Brexit? Please keep it respectful, of course, at all times. But yeah, let me

  • know in the comments below, what do you think? Have you heard of all these terms? Are some

  • of them new to you? I have to say, it's been a very confusing time here in Britain, I've

  • definitely noticed a big division in the country. People that want to remain in the EU, people

  • that want to leave, and it feels to me, that everyone is just shouting at each other. No

  • one is really listening. And that's one of the sad parts of this whole thing. But hopefully,

  • we can find our way through this, and resolve it on one or the other. Thank you so much

  • guys, this is Tom, the chief dreamer. Saying goodbye.

- Brexit, it's all anyone in the UK is talking about right now. But what on earth is it,

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BREXITは13の言葉で説明されています。 (BREXIT EXPLAINED in 13 WORDS)

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    Courtney Shih に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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