Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • Arcane books of forbidden lore,

  • disturbing secrets in the family bloodline,

  • and terrors so unspeakable the very thought of them might drive you mad.

  • By now, these have become standard elements in many modern horror stories.

  • But they were largely popularized by a single author

  • one whose name has become an adjective

  • for the particular type of terror he inspired.

  • Born in Providence, Rhode Island in 1890,

  • Howard Phillips Lovecraft grew up admiring the Gothic horror stories

  • written by Edgar Allan Poe and Robert Chambers.

  • But by the time he began writing in 1917,

  • World War I had cast a long shadow over the arts.

  • People had seen real horrors,

  • and were no longer frightened of fantastical folklore.

  • Lovecraft sought to invent a new kind of terror,

  • one that responded to the rapid scientific progress of his era.

  • His stories often used scientific elements to lend eerie plausibility.

  • In "The Colour out of Space,"

  • a strange meteorite falls near a farmhouse,

  • mutating the farm into a nightmarish hellscape.

  • Others incorporated scientific methodology into their form.

  • "At the Mountains of Madness" is written as a report of an Antarctic expedition

  • that unearths things better left undiscovered.

  • In others, mathematics themselves become a source of horror,

  • as impossible geometric configurations

  • wreak havoc on the minds of any who behold them.

  • Like then-recent discoveries of subatomic particles or X-rays,

  • the forces in Lovecraft's fiction were powerful,

  • yet often invisible and indescribable.

  • Rather than recognizable monsters, graphic violence, or startling shocks,

  • the terror ofLovecraftianhorror lies in what's not directly portrayed

  • but left instead to the dark depths of our imagination.

  • Lovecraft's dozens of short stories, novellas, and poems

  • often take place in the same fictional continuity,

  • with recurring characters, locations, and mythologies.

  • At first glance,

  • they appear to be set within Lovecraft's contemporary New England.

  • But beneath the surface of this seemingly similar reality lie dark masters,

  • for whom Earth's inhabitants are mere playthings.

  • More like primordial forces than mere deities,

  • Lovecraft's Great Old Ones lurk at the corners of our reality.

  • Beings such as Yog-Sothoth,

  • who froths as primal slime in nuclear chaos

  • beyond the nethermost outposts of space and time.”

  • Or the blind, idiot god Azathoth,

  • whose destructive impulses are stalled only by

  • themaddening beating of vile drums

  • and the thin monotonous whine of accursed flutes.”

  • These beings exist beyond our conceptions of reality,

  • their true forms as inscrutable as their motives.

  • Lovecraft's protagonists

  • often researchers, anthropologists, or antiquarians

  • stumble onto hints of their existence.

  • But even these indirect glimpses are enough to drive them insane.

  • And if they survive,

  • the reader is left with no feeling of triumph, only cosmic indifference

  • the terrible sense that we are but insignificant specks

  • at the mercy of unfathomable forces.

  • But perhaps the greatest power these creatures had

  • was their appeal to Lovecraft's contemporaries.

  • During his lifetime,

  • Lovecraft corresponded with other writers,

  • encouraging them to employ elements and characters from his stories in their own.

  • References to Lovecraftian gods or arcane tomes

  • can be found in many stories by his pen pals,

  • such as Robert E. Howard and Robert Bloch.

  • Today, this shared universe is called the Cthulhu Mythos,

  • named after Lovecraft's infamous blend of dragon and octopus.

  • Unfortunately,

  • Lovecraft's fear of the unknown found a less savory expression

  • in his personal views.

  • The author held strong racist views,

  • and some of his works include crude stereotypes and slurs.

  • But the rich world he created would outlive his personal prejudices.

  • And after Lovecraft's death,

  • the Cthulhu Mythos was adopted by a wide variety of authors,

  • often reimagining them from diverse perspectives

  • that transcend the author's prejudices.

  • Despite his literary legacy,

  • Lovecraft was never able to find financial success.

  • He died unknown and penniless at the age of 46–

  • a victim of the universe's cosmic indifference.

  • But his work has inspired numerous short stories, novels,

  • tabletop games, and cultural icons.

  • And as long as humans feel a sense of dread about our unknown future,

  • Lovecraftian horror will have a place in the darkest corners of our imagination.

Arcane books of forbidden lore,

字幕と単語

ワンタップで英和辞典検索 単語をクリックすると、意味が表示されます

B2 中上級

恐怖の巨人 (Titan of terror)

  • 182 10
    許尉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
動画の中の単語