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  • But Bill, isn't it a problem when science guys attempt to bully other people.

  • It's not working with the public.

  • That's the same with tornados….

  •   This is how conversations about climate change

  • often go down.

  • Scientists say climate change is real, but people still doubt them.

  • So, why isn't the science enough?

  •   It's not like there's a shortage of scientific

  • facts out there spelling it all out for us.

  •   But let's be honestnot many people

  • can relate to scientists sharing their data, no matter how compelling it is.

  •   When I give talks as a scientist versus when

  • I'm talking to a friend, I don't think I'm any more persuasive.

  • In fact, I think as a scientist, I may be actually less trusted.

  • The problem is you have people who are very, very smart when it comes to reading data,

  • but they're dumb when it comes to dealing with people.

  • So people's relationship to smarty-pants people, I think you have to take into account.

  • People don't care how much you know until they know how much you care.

  •   But this guy?

  • He cares.

  •   Dr. Veerabhadran Ramanathanknown by many

  • asRam” — is an atmospheric scientist at UC San Diego's Scripps Institution of

  • Oceanography.

  • And for decades, he's been a leading and prescient voice on climate change, long before

  • the term was widely known.

  •   Ram also designs instruments to measure climate

  • data on satellites, aircraft, and ships, but he feels like he's really just writing obituaries

  • for the planet.

  •   Every time I come back from one of my expeditions,

  • it's always I bring back bad news  

  • His scientific findings were simply not inspiring public action.

  • So, Ram got creative.

  • He's been a science adviser for the Vatican since 2004.

  • In 2014, Ram was chosen to speak directly to Pope Francis.

  •   Now, he only had three minutes, literally

  • a “parking lot pitch,” outside the pope's apartment at the Vatican.

  • Ram had memorized a few sentences in Spanish, but when he saw the pope emerge from his Fiat,

  • he just blanked out.

  • I completely panicked, a panic attack!

  • Then I said the heck with it, I'm going to tell him in English.

  • With a translator between them, Ram told the pope that climate change was a moral and ethical

  • issue.

  •   Most of the pollution comes from the wealthiest

  • 1 billion.

  • And the worst consequences of that is going to be for the poorest 3 billion who had almost

  • nothing to do with this pollution.

  • At this moment, I had finished my two sentences.

  • In English, hopefully.

  • In English.

  • Yeah

  • And he asked me in Spanish, what can he do about this?

  • And you're looking quite confused, trying to get your brain around what to say.

  • Yes.

  • I had not planned that.

  • I told him, look, you are now the moral leader of the world.

  • So in your speeches, if you can ask people to be better stewards of the planet that will

  • have a huge impact.

  •   Not only did Pope Francis include this message

  • in an address several days later, but he even took his message to Twitter.

  •   This caused a sensation because it was the

  • first time that the Catholic Church came out and talked about climate change to a global

  • audience of over 1.2 billion Catholics.

  • This chat with Ram and the pope actually led to what's since been called theFrancis

  • Effect.”35% of Catholics said that the pope's message changed their personal views on climate

  • change.

  • I know if I had planned the whole thing, it would have been totally different.

  • I would have gone into carbon dioxide, this, all the pollution, scientific details.

  • Since I was not prepared, I went to my heart.

  • I could have blown this!

  • Instead, Ram jokes that those three minutes were the best scientific moments of his life.

  • They were certainly one his most influential.

  • Just by switching the messenger from a scientist to a religious figure, people listened.

  •   And perhaps nowhere is the messenger more

  • important than in politics.

  • In the US, climate change has become a fiercely partisan issue.

  • The majority of Americans are concerned about climate change, but there's a sharp difference

  • between liberals and conservatives on the issue.

  •   And that's largely attributed to who they're

  • getting their information from, regardless of what the science actually says.

  •     

  • If the Earth becomes a partisan issue, everybody loses.

  • The good thing is, you're now seeing people on the conservative and libertarian right

  • saying, hey, hold on a second.

  • We have a right and a liberty as American homeowners to power our homes as we please.

  •   Debbie Dooley, a co-founder of the Tea Party

  • movement, is one of these conservatives.

  •   People that did not know me made the mistake

  • of calling me a tree hugging, left-wing liberal.

  • A founder of the Tea Party movement!

  • I laughed and I said, well clearly they don't know me!

  •   I am probably the first well-known conservative

  • in Georgia to come out on a grassroots level and advocate for solar.

  • I don't like monopoliesthey deserve competition and choice.

  •   And Debbie agrees that there really is no

  • reason that climate change should be a partisan issue.

  • It's more fiscally responsible to prevent damage to the environment than it is to clean

  • it up.

  • As Ronald Reagan said, “Being good stewards of the environment God gave us should not

  • be a partisan issue.”

  • Focus on the message that resonates no matter if you're a Republican or a Democrat or

  • Independent.

  • And the last time I checked, this Earth belongs to all of us.

  • All of us want clean air or water.

  • And we need to protect it.

  • To get this message out, Debbie founded Conservatives for Energy Freedom.

  • And they recently helped defeat an anti-solar amendment in Florida that was pushed by the

  • state's utilities.

  •   The only message conservatives heard was from

  • groups that were funded by monopolies or fossil fuel that wanted to stop competition from

  • alternative energy.

  • They're hearing a different message from Conservatives for Energy Freedom.

  • We're giving them the facts and we're having an impact.

  • But not everyone is moved by politics or religion.

  • Often what resonates most with us and gets us motivated is simply understanding what's

  • going on in our own backyard.

  •   Oakland-based artist and grassroots activist

  • Favianna Rodriguez uses art to draw awareness to climate change.

  •   I grew up in the Latino district of Oakland

  • and I always understood the impacts of environmental devastation just by looking around where I

  • live.

  • The asthma rates that were in my community were astonishing.

  • The accessibility to clean, whole food was very tough.

  • And so for me, these are all impacts of what it means to not live in alignment with the

  • environment.

  •   When I think of environmentalists I think

  • of native people who are at the front lines.

  • I think of people who are impacted, who are really trying to fight for clean air and clean

  • water.

  • The organization that I co-founded, CultureStrike, one of the main areas we focus on is to show

  • the many faces of environmentalism.

  •   And, Favianna isn't just talking the talk.

  •   I just converted my entire home to be powered

  • from solar energy, and I'm the first in my community to do so.

  • I want to model to my predominantly immigrant Latino community what it means to go solar.

  • And that this is actually a less expensive way to get our energy.

  • And that we can be the leaders.

  • We are among the most impacted, we can be the solution bearers.

  •   So while scientists should definitely be part

  • of the conversation, they can't be the only messengers.

  • Of course everyone wants clean air, pure water, even cheap energy.

  • So what we need is a chorus, a diversity of many voices to deliver this message and to

  • deliver it in a way that gets their community to sit up and listen.

  •   You are a messenger too.

  • Maybe the most important one we have.

  • We hope we've given you some tools to think more about climate change and how our lives

  • intersect with this giant issue.

  • Head over to climate.universityofcalifornia.edu for more tools and resources.

But Bill, isn't it a problem when science guys attempt to bully other people.

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科学者は気候科学の最高の擁護者ではない (Scientists really arent the best champions of climate science)

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    QWWW に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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