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  • (uptempo music)

  • - Hello everyone, I'm Stephen Galloway,

  • and welcome to Close-Up with Hollywood Reporter Directors.

  • I'd like to welcome Angelina Jolie,

  • Guillermo del Toro, Greta Gerwig, Patty Jenkins,

  • Joe Wright, and Denis Villeneuve.

  • You're on a lifeboat.

  • You happen to have a DVD or Blu-Ray player.

  • - Oh no! - We're gonna do that?

  • That's not fair. - Oh no.

  • - [Stephen] What film are you gonna take with you to watch?

  • Let's start with you, Guillermo.

  • - Oh, why? (laughs)

  • - [Denis] You're the cinephile of the group.

  • (laughs) - Why?

  • Emotionally, I will answer something

  • completely non-prestigious.

  • Yeah, it's because of what it did when I was a teenager,

  • The Road Warrior.

  • (laughs)

  • It completely destroyed my brain.

  • - [Stephen] Wow, I thought you were gonna say Frankenstein.

  • - And, that's the problem.

  • The other one is I would do that.

  • I would take James Whale's Frankenstein.

  • And, it's just The Road Warrior, for me, it's the first time

  • I noticed how the camera worked and moved

  • and it was a ballet.

  • And, I would probably change my mind half way

  • through the life boat journey.

  • I would go, "Where is Frankenstein?"

  • (laughs)

  • - Have you ever met George Miller?

  • - I met and I worship George Miller, and I intend,

  • my sabbatical this year I'm going to do two

  • two week interviews.

  • One with Michael Mann and one with George Miller

  • purely about the craft to publish them in book form

  • just because I wanna talk with them about

  • what we never talk about, which is the craft.

  • Lenses, cameras, why, why push, why not push,

  • when crane, when dolly, why not?

  • To talk about the aspects of or painting

  • that nobody talks about which is vigor of the trays,

  • amount of paint.

  • We always discuss movies sort of in

  • a liturgical way. - If you had one question

  • to ask George Miller what would it be?

  • - To whom?

  • - If you had one question to ask George Miller

  • what would it be?

  • - Do you like me?

  • (laughs)

  • - [Stephen] You're so insecure.

  • (laughs)

  • - Dad? (laughs)

  • (laughs)

  • - What's your lifeboat film?

  • - Oh god, you're going to jump to me next.

  • I'm like sitting here listening to him the whole time

  • and I'm like, "Oh my god, so many movies

  • "go through my head."

  • 'Cause there's the, I have all my--

  • - Only one. - One.

  • - I Know Where I'm Going, Powell and Pressburger.

  • Like, I just love that movie and also like, there's the

  • design of it fascinates me because it's like so romantic

  • but you never notice that it was really

  • becoming that romantic.

  • - It was so romantic, Powell and Pressburger, so romantic.

  • - And so good, and timeless. - What did it teach you

  • that you then brought to your work?

  • - The pocket of emotion of romance because I love

  • romantic films and I love romantic things.

  • - What do you mean by the pocket of emotion?

  • - It's the space where you get it and it's sincere

  • and it's real and you just keep it from hitting the ground.

  • It's almost the electricity of what love is, to me, is it's

  • when fear is mixed with desire and it's (vocalizing).

  • And so, there was something so incredible about

  • that moment, you never saw it coming and all of a sudden

  • you were (vocalizes) these two people are just sitting there

  • and you're like (gasps) those people are meant

  • to be together, oh my god.

  • And then, the storm and, you know, anyway.

  • - They do it in other films, too, they do that.

  • - Oh yeah, and they're so incredible.

  • - Masterful. - Such incredible filmmakers.

  • - Is love in real life ever what it is in films?

  • - I think so. - Yes.

  • - But, I think too often-- - Good answer.

  • - Well anyway, I have theories about love

  • but the fear and desire being equaled is the thing

  • and I think film allows that to happen,

  • but that's what it is in real life, too.

  • Although, we always wanna shut it down.

  • And, your desire is always to get, no, upper hand

  • and then as soon as you do it's not so much love anymore.

  • - I love that answer.

  • - So, I think it's like film allows people to feel

  • comfortable extending it longer.

  • - But, just to talk about romance, I'm not choosing

  • this on my boat, but Brief Encounters that David Lean movie

  • when they're talking and she has that moment where

  • she looks at him, he's describing something and she

  • looks at him and she says, "You looked like

  • "a little boy just then."

  • And then, he looks at her and it's like too late,

  • they're already in love and it's too late.

  • And, it's like that moment of like they both realized

  • what had happened and they both knew that

  • the other one knew it.

  • And then, they have to go and it's like all of sudden

  • you're like oh no, you and I, now you're already in love.

  • Anyway-- - And your boat,

  • what is your boat?

  • - [Greta] Singing in the Rain.

  • - Aw. - That's a nice one.

  • - I mean, if you're on a boat--

  • - Don't doubt yourself, it's

  • a really good one. - If you're on a boat.

  • - Do you find that you're trying to imitate the best

  • in another work or that your job is to react against it?

  • 'Cause there is that theory that great artists

  • actually have another artist that they react against.

  • - Against. - Against.

  • - Mm, but why just one?

  • It would be hard to pick just one that

  • you're reacting against.

  • - There's a lot.

  • - But, I think we're always, I think it's the,

  • I think you're always absolutely

  • studying and paying homage to the people before you

  • and then turning it just a little bit yourself.

  • Like, that's the whole game, to me.

  • - But, it happens, sorry to interrupt the boat thing,

  • but has it happened to you that there are other directors

  • that you start against and you end up realizing

  • they're your favorite.

  • And you go, "I love this guy."

  • - They're all silent, that means you're the only one.

  • - Yeah, not so much, not so much.

  • There are filmmakers that I have aspired to be like.

  • Personally, very personally it's probably a reaction

  • against my father, as well, his work, who was a puppeteer.

  • - Freud would have something to say about that.

  • (laughs)

  • - Yeah, he was a puppeteer and he made

  • very beautiful marionette shows.

  • He founded the first purpose built puppet theater

  • in London in 1961.

  • But, one of the burden's of his career was the fact

  • that everyone saw puppetry as being a kind of

  • a children's entertainment, and he considered it to be

  • a fine art.

  • And so, a lot of it is a kind of reaction against

  • his perceived failure, as well.

  • - And react against it meaning what?

  • - Determination to do better.

  • - Oh yeah, your Anna Karenina has a little bit of that.

  • - No, no it's all about puppetry.

  • It's all about how, you know. - Oh wow.

  • - It all comes from puppetry, really.

  • - Would you chose the lifeboat film

  • with a puppet or without?

  • - Would I choose what?

  • - Your lifeboat film with a puppet

  • or without. - Without, definitely.

  • - It would be what?

  • - It would be probably Wings of Desire by

  • Wim Wenders. - Wow, yeah.

  • - Which I love because of its humanity.

  • And, I think on a lifeboat I might need

  • to be reminded of my love of humanity.

  • So, I'd take that one.

  • Maybe even also Brief Encounter, as well.

  • - Denis? - Yeah, I was saying