Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • I'm going to tell you two things today:

    翻訳: Kato Takumi 校正: Masaki Yanagishita

  • One is what we have lost,

    今日私は2つのことについて話します

  • and two, a way to bring it back.

    1つめは私たちは何を失ってしまったのか

  • And let me start with this.

    2つめはそれを取り戻す方法です

  • This is my baseline:

    まず最初に

  • This is the Mediterranean coast

    これが私の基準となっています

  • with no fish, bare rock

    地中海沿岸部です

  • and lots of sea urchins that like to eat the algae.

    魚がおらず 岩肌が露出し

  • Something like this is what I first saw

    海藻を好んで食べるウニが大量にいます

  • when I jumped in the water for the first time

    初めて潜った海は

  • in the Mediterranean coast off Spain.

    このような海でした

  • Now, if an alien came to earth --

    スペインの地中海沿岸でした

  • let's call him Joe --

    もし宇宙人が地球に来たら

  • what would Joe see?

    ―名前をジョーとしましょう―

  • If Joe jumped in a coral reef,

    ジョーは何をみるでしょう

  • there are many things the alien could see.

    ジョーがサンゴ礁に飛び込んだとしたら

  • Very unlikely, Joe would jump

    数多くの生物を目にするでしょう

  • on a pristine coral reef,

    ジョーが手つかずのサンゴ礁に

  • a virgin coral reef with lots of coral, sharks, crocodiles,

    飛び込むことはほとんどないでしょう

  • manatees, groupers,

    人跡未踏のサンゴ礁にはサンゴやサメ

  • turtles, etc.

    ワニやマナティー

  • So, probably, what Joe would see

    ハタやカメがたくさんいます

  • would be in this part, in the greenish part of the picture.

    たぶんジョーが目にするのは

  • Here we have the extreme with dead corals,

    こちらの部分です 緑色の側になります

  • microbial soup and jellyfish.

    死んだサンゴや

  • And where the diver is,

    たくさんの微生物やクラゲがいます

  • this is probably where most of the reefs of the world are now,

    ダイバーがいるのが

  • with very few corals, algae overgrowing the corals,

    世界の大半のサンゴ礁の現状で

  • lots of bacteria,

    ほとんどサンゴはなく  藻がはびこり

  • and where the large animals are gone.

    大量のバクテリアがいます

  • And this is what most marine scientists have seen too.

    大型生物は存在していません

  • This is their baseline. This is what they think is natural

    多くの海洋学者がみてきた状況です

  • because we started modern science

    これが基準であり  海洋学者たちが考える自然です

  • with scuba diving long after

    私たちの現在の科学は

  • we started degrading marine ecosystems.

    スキューバダイビングと共に始まりました

  • So I'm going to get us all on a time machine,

    人間が海の生態系の破壊を始めてから ずっと後の話です

  • and we're going to the left; we're going to go back to the past

    そこで皆さんをタイムマシーンに招待します

  • to see what the ocean was like.

    左側 ―過去に向かって進みます

  • And let's start with this time machine, the Line Islands,

    海のかつての姿を見てみましょう

  • where we have conducted a series

    このタイムマシーンから始めましょう ライン島です

  • of National Geographic expeditions.

    私たちは一連の ナショナル・ジオグラフィックの調査をしました

  • This sea is an archipelago belonging to Kiribati

    キリバスに属する多島海で

  • that spans across the equator

    赤道を越えて広がり

  • and it has several uninhabited,

    いくつかは無人で

  • unfished, pristine islands

    漁業が行われていない 手つかずの島です

  • and a few inhabited islands.

    そして人の住む島がいくつかあります

  • So let's start with the first one: Christmas Island, over 5,000 people.

    最初の島です 人口5千人あまりのクリスマス島です

  • Most of the reefs are dead,

    サンゴ礁のほとんどが死滅し

  • most of the corals are dead -- overgrown by algae --

    サンゴが死に 藻がはびこっています

  • and most of the fish are smaller than

    ここにいる魚の大きさは

  • the pencils we use to count them.

    魚を数えるための使った鉛筆よりも小さいです

  • We did 250 hours of diving here

    私たちは250時間潜りました

  • in 2005.

    2005年のことです

  • We didn't see a single shark.

    一匹のサメも見ませんでした

  • This is the place that Captain Cook discovered in 1777

    1777年に島を発見したキャプテン・クックは

  • and he described a huge abundance of sharks

    多数のサメがいたことを記しています

  • biting the rudders and the oars of their small boats

    上陸する時に サメが小さなボートの舵や

  • while they were going ashore.

    オールに噛みついたのです

  • Let's move the dial a little bit to the past.

    さらに過去にさかのぼってみましょう

  • Fanning Island, 2,500 people.

    2500人が住むファニング島です

  • The corals are doing better here. Lots of small fish.

    サンゴ礁が元気で 小さな魚が無数にいます

  • This is what many divers would consider paradise.

    多くのダイバーが楽園だと思う姿です

  • This is where you can see most

    フロリダキーズ連邦海洋保護区の大部分で

  • of the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary.

    同じ様子を見ることができます

  • And many people think this is really, really beautiful,

    多くの人がとても美しいと感じます

  • if this is your baseline.

    これを基準とするならの話です

  • If we go back to a place

    もし私たちが

  • like Palmyra Atoll,

    パルミラ環礁のような海に戻ると

  • where I was with Jeremy Jackson a few years ago,

    数年前にジェレミー・ジャクソンと 訪れた場所ですが

  • the corals are doing better and there are sharks.

    サンゴの状況は輪をかけて良好で たくさんのサメがいました

  • You can see sharks in every single dive.

    潜るたびにサメに遭遇しました

  • And this is something that is very unusual in today's coral reefs.

    現在のサンゴ礁では珍しいことです

  • But then, if we shift the dial

    しかしその一方で

  • 200, 500 years back,

    ダイアルを200年や500年前に戻すと

  • then we get to the places where the corals

    私たちが到着するのは

  • are absolutely healthy and gorgeous,

    サンゴが完全な状態で極めて美しく

  • forming spectacular structures,

    目を見張るような様相をし

  • and where the predators

    そこでは肉食魚が

  • are the most conspicuous thing,

    最も目立つ生物となり

  • where you see between 25 and 50 sharks per dive.

    一度潜ると25から50頭のサメに出会います

  • What have we learned from these places?

    これらの場所から何を学んだのでしょうか

  • This is what we thought was natural.

    私たちが考えてきた自然の姿です

  • This is what we call the biomass pyramid.

    バイオマスのピラミッドと呼びます

  • If we get all of the fish of a coral reef together and weigh them,

    サンゴ礁のすべての魚を集めて

  • this is what we would expect.

    重さを量るとこうなります

  • Most of the biomass is low on the food chain, the herbivores,

    食物連鎖の底辺の草食生物が バイオマスの大半を占めており

  • the parrotfish, the surgeonfish that eat the algae.

    藻を食べるブダイやクロハギ

  • Then the plankton feeders, these little damselfish,

    プランクトン食者の小さなスズメダイ

  • the little animals floating in the water.

    水中に漂う小さな生物たちです

  • And then we have a lower biomass of carnivores,

    肉食魚のバイオマスは小さくなり

  • and a lower biomass of top head,

    頂点では さらに小さなバイオマスです

  • or the sharks, the large snappers, the large groupers.

    そこにはサメや 大型のフエダイ類やハタ類が含まれます

  • But this is a consequence.

    それがこうなります

  • This view of the world is a consequence

    この世界観は

  • of having studied degraded reefs.

    劣化したサンゴの研究の結果です

  • When we went to pristine reefs,

    手つかずのサンゴ礁を訪れたとき

  • we realized that the natural world

    自然界は

  • was upside down;

    真逆だと気づきました

  • this pyramid was inverted.

    このピラミッドは逆さになります

  • The top head does account for most of the biomass,

    上位の生物がバイオマスの大半を占め

  • in some places up to 85 percent,

    場所によっては85パーセントを占めます

  • like Kingman Reef, which is now protected.

    現在保護されているキングマン礁で見られます

  • The good news is that, in addition to having more predators,

    嬉しいことに 肉食魚だけでなく

  • there's more of everything.

    すべての個体数が増えています

  • The size of these boxes is bigger.

    この部分が大きくなります

  • We have more sharks, more biomass of snappers,

    サメの数が増え  フエダイのバイオマスが大きくなり

  • more biomass of herbivores, too,

    草食魚のバイオマスも大きくなります

  • like these parrot fish that are like marine goats.

    このブダイは海のヤギのようで

  • They clean the reef; everything that grows enough to be seen,

    サンゴをきれいにし 見えるものを食べつくし

  • they eat, and they keep the reef clean

    サンゴをきれいに保ち

  • and allow the corals to replenish.

    サンゴが回復するのを助けます

  • Not only do these places --

    ここに限らず 原始で未踏の海域には

  • these ancient, pristine places -- have lots of fish,

    多くの魚が生息するだけでなく

  • but they also have other important components

    生態系の重要な構成要素となる

  • of the ecosystem like the giant clams;

    大型の貝も生息しています

  • pavements of giant clams in the lagoons,

    ラグーンのオオジャコガイは

  • up to 20, 25 per square meter.

    1平方メートルに20から25体生息しています

  • These have disappeared from every inhabited reef in the world,

    人が入ったサンゴ礁から これらの貝は消滅しました

  • and they filter the water;

    オオジャコガイは水をろ過し

  • they keep the water clean from

    微生物や病原体から

  • microbes and pathogens.

    水をきれいに保ちます

  • But still, now we have global warming.

    しかし地球温暖化が起っています

  • If we don't have fishing because these reefs are protected by law

    サンゴが法律によって保護されたり

  • or their remoteness, this is great.

    遠すぎて漁場にならないのは良いことですが

  • But the water gets warmer for too long

    長期に渡り海水温度が上昇すると

  • and the corals die.

    サンゴは死んでしまいます

  • So how are these fish,

    これらの魚や

  • these predators going to help?

    肉食魚がどのように役立つのでしょうか

  • Well, what we have seen is that

    私たちが目撃したのは

  • in this particular area

    ある地域の

  • during El Nino, year '97, '98,

    1997年と98年のエルニーニョの年の様子です

  • the water was too warm for too long,

    長い間 海水が温かくなり過ぎ

  • and many corals bleached

    多くのサンゴが白化し

  • and many died.

    多くが死んでしまいました

  • In Christmas, where the food web is really trimmed down,

    クリスマス島では 食物網が縮小し

  • where the large animals are gone,

    大型生物がいなくなりました

  • the corals have not recovered.

    サンゴは回復していません

  • In Fanning Island, the corals are not recovered.

    ファニング島でもサンゴは回復していません

  • But you see here

    見ての通り

  • a big table coral that died and collapsed.

    大きなテーブルサンゴが死んで 崩壊しています

  • And the fish have grazed the algae,

    魚が藻を食べているため

  • so the turf of algae is a little lower.

    藻が生えている部分は少ないです

  • Then you go to Palmyra Atoll

    パルミラ環礁を見てみましょう

  • that has more biomass of herbivores,

    草食魚のバイオマスが大きく

  • and the dead corals are clean,

    死んだサンゴはきれいになり

  • and the corals are coming back.

    サンゴが回復しつつあります

  • And when you go to the pristine side,

    手つかずの海をみてみましょう

  • did this ever bleach?

    これがかつて白化したのでしょうか

  • These places bleached too, but they recovered faster.

    ここでもサンゴは白化しましたが 早く回復しました

  • The more intact, the more complete,

    食物網に損傷がなく 完全に近く

  • [and] the more complex your food web,

    より複雑であれば

  • the higher the resilience, [and] the more likely

    より回復力が強いのです

  • that the system is going to recover

    温暖化の短期的な影響から

  • from the short-term impacts of warming events.

    回復しやすいシステムとなっています

  • And that's good news, so we need to recover that structure.

    これは朗報です この構造を復活させることが必要です

  • We need to make sure that all of the pieces of the ecosystem are there

    生態系のすべてが揃っていることを 確認する必要があります

  • so the ecosystem can adapt

    そうすれば 生態系は

  • to the effects of global warming.

    地球温暖化の影響に適応可能となります

  • So if we have to reset the baseline,

    基準をリセットし

  • if we have to push the ecosystem back to the left,

    生態系を過去に戻す必要があるなら

  • how can we do it?

    どうすれば可能でしょうか

  • Well, there are several ways.

    いくつかの方法があります

  • One very clear way is the marine protected areas,

    確かな方法の一つは海洋保護区です

  • especially no-take reserves

    特に禁漁の保護区です

  • that we set aside

    私たちは

  • to allow for the recovery for marine life.

    海洋生物が回復するのを待つのです

  • And let me go back to that image

    地中海の写真に

  • of the Mediterranean.

    戻ってみましょう

  • This was my baseline. This is what I saw when I was a kid.

    子どもの時に見た私の基準となる海です

  • And at the same time I was watching

    その頃見ていた

  • Jacques Cousteau's shows on TV,

    ジャック・クストーの番組では

  • with all this richness and abundance and diversity.

    豊かで多種多様な生物がいる海が 紹介されていました

  • And I thought that this richness

    この豊かな海は

  • belonged to tropical seas,

    熱帯の海に違いないと思い

  • and that the Mediterranean was a naturally poor sea.

    地中海は元々貧弱な海だと思っていました

  • But, little did I know,

    初めて海洋保護区で潜るまでは

  • until I jumped for the first time in a marine reserve.

    知る由もなかったのです

  • And this is what I saw, lots of fish.

    そこで無数の魚を目にしました

  • After a few years, between five and seven years,

    数年で ―5年か7年くらいで

  • fish come back, they eat the urchins,

    魚が戻り 魚はウニを食べ

  • and then the algae grow again.

    藻が育ち始めました

  • So you have this little algal forest,

    小さな藻場があれば

  • and in the size of a laptop

    ノートパソコンほどの広さの中に

  • you can find more than 100 species of algae,

    藻は100種類以上見つかります

  • mostly microscopic fit

    ほとんど顕微鏡でしか見えません

  • hundreds of species of little animals

    何百もの小さな生物が

  • that then feed the fish,

    魚のエサとなり

  • so that the system recovers.

    システムが回復します

  • And this particular place, the Medes Islands Marine Reserve,

    メデス諸島海洋保護区です

  • is only 94 hectares,

    94ヘクタールしかありませんが

  • and it brings 6 million euros to the local economy,

    地域経済に600万ユーロをもたらしています

  • 20 times more than fishing,

    漁業の20倍で

  • and it represents 88 percent

    観光収入の

  • of all the tourist revenue.

    88パーセントを占めています

  • So these places not only help the ecosystem

    保護区は生態系を救うだけでなく

  • but also help the people

    人々の役に立ち

  • who can benefit from the ecosystem.

    人々は生態系から恩恵を受けます

  • So let me just give you a summary

    禁漁保護区の役割を

  • of what no-take reserves do.

    まとめてみましょう

  • These places, when we protect them,

    これらの場所を保護することによって

  • if we compare them to unprotected areas nearby, this is what happens.

    保護しない周辺の場所と比べると 次のようなことが起ります

  • The number of species increases 21 percent;

    生物の種類が21パーセント増加します

  • so if you have 1,000 species

    1000種の生物がいるとすれば

  • you would expect 200 more in a marine reserve.

    保護区では200種増えます

  • This is very substantial.

    これは相当な数です

  • The size of organisms increases a third,

    生物の大きさが3割大きくなり

  • so your fish are now this big.

    魚はこの大きさになります

  • The abundance, how many fish you have per square meter,

    存在量 ―1平方メートルあたりの魚の密度は

  • increases almost 170 percent.

    170パーセント増加します

  • And the biomass -- this is the most spectacular change --

    バイオマスに最も大きな変化が現れ

  • 4.5 times greater biomass

    4.5倍に増加します

  • on average, just after five to seven years.

    平均5年から7年の間にです

  • In some places up to 10 times

    場所によっては保護区のバイオマスが

  • larger biomass inside the reserves.

    10倍にもなります

  • So we have all these things

    保護区内で育った生物は

  • inside the reserve that grow, and what do they do?

    どのように役立つのでしょうか

  • They reproduce. That's population biology 101.

    集団生物学の基本ですが 繁殖します

  • If you don't kill the fish, they take a longer time to die,

    魚を殺さなければ 魚の寿命は延び

  • they grow larger and they reproduce a lot.

    より大きく育ち より繁殖します

  • And same thing for invertebrates. This is the example.

    無脊椎生物でも同じです ここに例があります

  • These are egg cases

    卵のうです

  • laid by a snail off the coast of Chile,

    チリの沿岸部で巻貝が産卵したものですが

  • and this is how many eggs they lay on the bottom.

    海底に無数の卵が産みつけられています

  • Outside the reserve,

    保護区の外では

  • you cannot even detect this.

    見つけることさえできません

  • One point three million eggs per square meter

    保護区内には1平方メートルに 130万個の卵があり

  • inside the marine reserve where these snails are very abundant.

    巻貝がたくさん生息しています

  • So these organisms reproduce,

    これらの生物は繁殖し

  • the little larvae juveniles spill over,

    小さな幼生が溢れ出し

  • they all spill over,

    すべてが溢れ出し

  • and then people can benefit from them outside too.

    保護区外の人も恩恵を受けます

  • This is in the Bahamas: Nassau grouper.

    バハマのナッソー・グルーパーです

  • Huge abundance of groupers inside the reserve,

    保護区には多数のグルーパーが生息し

  • and the closer you get to the reserve,

    保護区に近づくについれて

  • the more fish you have.

    グルーパーの数は増えます

  • So the fishermen are catching more.

    漁師の釣る魚が増えます

  • You can see where the limits of the reserve are

    保護区の境界には

  • because you see the boats lined up.

    ボートが並び一目瞭然です

  • So there is spill over;

    溢れ出した魚が

  • there are benefits beyond the boundaries of these reserves

    保護区の外にも利益をもたらし

  • that help people around them,

    周辺の人々に役立っています

  • while at the same time

    同時に

  • the reserve is protecting

    保護区ではすべての生物を保護し

  • the entire habitat. It is building resilience.

    回復力を増します

  • So what we have now --

    現在の状況は

  • or a world without reserves --

    つまり保護区のない世界は

  • is like a debit account

    引き落とし口座のようで

  • where we withdraw all the time

    いつも引き出すだけで

  • and we never make any deposit.

    預金することがありません

  • Reserves are like savings accounts.

    保護区は定期預金口座のようなものです

  • We