Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • Hi, guys. I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this lesson on four phrasal verbs

  • with "put". If you'd like to check out more information on phrasal verbs with "put", we

  • have another lesson made by myself that you can check on the website, and it's linked

  • to this video. Today, we're going to look at four different phrasal verbs with "put".

  • The first one is to "put up with something/someone". So any time you see "ST", it means "something"

  • in this video, and "SO" means "someone", so to "put up with something or someone". Let's

  • look at this sentence and see if we can identify the meaning. So I have, "I hate traffic."

  • "I hate traffic, but I have to put up with it." So imagine every day you go to work,

  • you must take the metro or your car, and you have to drive. You have to drive through the

  • traffic. You hate the traffic, but you have to use it. So in this situation, in this context,

  • to "put up with something", to "put up" with traffic means to "tolerate" it. You don't

  • like it, but you have to do it, okay? So this means, "to tolerate", okay? Those of you who

  • don't know what "tolerate" means, again, it means that you don't like it, but you still

  • have to deal with it in some way. And, again, you don't only have to "put up" with things,

  • like I "put up" with traffic every day. You can "put up" with people in your life. So

  • maybe at work or in your school, university, there are people you don't like, but you see

  • them every day and you have to tolerate them, you have to "put up" with them, okay?

  • All right, guys, so No. 2, we have to "put something on". This is a separable phrasal

  • verb, so this means the (ST) can actually go in the middle of the phrasal verb or at

  • the end of the phrasal verb. So the sentence is, "Put on your jacket." It's also possible

  • to say, "Put your jacket on." Based on the context of this sentence, I think it's easy

  • to see that to "put on" means to, you know, "cover yourself" with clothing. And it's not

  • only clothing - basically, anything that you can put on your body, like jewelry -- "to

  • cover your body with clothing or jewelry". So the most common context is to put on clothing,

  • so, "Put on your socks." "Put on your shirt." "Put on your pants." Whatever it is. Okay.

  • No. 3, to "put something away." Just like "put on", to "put away" is a separable phrasal

  • verb, which means you can put the object, the (ST), in the middle of the phrasal verb

  • or at the end of the phrasal verb. So, "Put away your books. It's time for the test."

  • So the context here is: You're in class. The teacher says, "Put away your books. It's time

  • for the test." You can't look at your books, right? So where do you put your book? Well,

  • most students put them in a backpack, right? Your bag. So to "put something away" means

  • you have to "put it in an appropriate place". So the appropriate place for your books is

  • your school bag. So "to put in an appropriate place", so a place where that is expected

  • that you would put that thing or whatever it is, okay?

  • And finally, we have to "put something together". And once more, this is a separable phrasal

  • verb, so you can put the object in the middle or at the end. Let's look at the sentence.

  • "I hate putting together new furniture." So if you go to IKEA, which is a really popular

  • furniture store, when you go home, you have to put the furniture together. It doesn't

  • come as one piece. You have to work with it. And to "put it together" means to "assemble

  • it", "complete it". So this means, "to assemble", okay? So kids can "put things together" if

  • they play with Legos, or if you are good with computers, you can "put together" a new computer,

  • or in this case -- this is something that I'm very familiar with -- you "put together"

  • new furniture.

  • Okay, guys. So once more, those four phrasal verbs are to "put up with something or someone".

  • You don't like it, but you have to do it, okay? So you "put up" with traffic -- "put

  • up" with people. "Put something on": to cover your body with clothing or jewelry. "Put something

  • away": to put it in an appropriate place. And to "put something together" means to "assemble" something.

  • And if you'd like to test your knowledge of this material, as always, you can check out the quiz on www.engvid.com.

  • Good luck, and take care.

Hi, guys. I'm Alex. Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this lesson on four phrasal verbs

字幕と単語

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

A2 初級

置く、置く、片付ける、まとめるの4つの句動詞 (4 Phrasal Verbs with PUT - put up, put on, put away, put together)

  • 331 64
    Michael Hsu に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
動画の中の単語