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  • Hello!

  • This is Emma from mmmEnglish. In this lesson, I want to share some of my

  • favourite English adjectives with you!

  • To be expressive, to show emotion and feeling and to sound more interesting in English,

  • then you need to start pushing your vocabulary further.

  • Saying something is "nice" or "beautiful" is good

  • But adjectives like magnificent, remarkable or inspirational are so much more meaningful!

  • So let's talk about adjectives. They're a big group of words in English!

  • And they're used to describe or to give more information about a noun.

  • Word order is important with adjectives.

  • When used next to a noun, the adjective comes before the noun!

  • Like this:

  • A or an with an adjective plus a noun.

  • "An incredible story."

  • This structure is really common too!

  • A noun plus the be verb plus an adjective.

  • "Her recommendations were excellent."

  • So today, I want to share eight of my favourite adjectives with you,

  • to help you build your vocabulary when you're describing things - or places!

  • Now I’m including both positive and negative adjectives so

  • when things are good, when things are bad and also neutral adjectives,

  • when things are OK, but nothing special.

  • All of the adjectives that I’m going to talk about can be used to describe people too

  • but they're commonly used to describe places and things - so that's what we're focusing on today!

  • Magnificent. Magnificent.

  • Can you hear where the stress is? Magnificent.

  • You can use this adjective when something is very impressive or it's very inspiring or very beautiful.

  • When it's used with people it can also mean that they are very skillful.

  • Now see how all of those examples use "very" in front of regular adjectives?

  • That’s because magnificent is an extreme adjective, a really strong adjective.

  • So you can use it to add emphasis to your emotions.

  • For example: "That meal was magnificent.

  • I haven’t eaten that well in a long time!"

  • "We woke up at sunrise and had a magnificent view over the Indian Ocean."

  • "You were magnificent!" (That's talking about your performance)

  • Remarkable.

  • RemArkable. Hear that stress?

  • Use this adjective when something surprises you or it impresses you!

  • And it’s worth commenting on, because it's unique or it's unusual.

  • For example. "The Guggenheim is a remarkable building."

  • "It is remarkable that the pyramids in Egypt were built thousands of years ago!"

  • "After the car accident, he made made a remarkable recovery."

  • "His presentation was remarkable - it was unlike any of the others at the conference."

  • Remarkable can also be used to describe a person, when they're unlike anyone else that you've ever met.

  • Or they've done something really inspiring, they're really clever.

  • Like "She really is a remarkable woman."

  • The opposite is unremarkable - and it's used when something is not special or unique at all.

  • Obvious. Another good one.

  • Obvious. The stress is always important with adjectives

  • because pushing down on that stressed syllable helps you to emphasise the word

  • and to make the meaning stronger. Obvious.

  • If something is "obvious", it’s really clear and it's easy to understand.

  • "It’s obvious that he’s in love with you!"

  • "It was obvious that she didn’t want to be at the party."

  • (Her behaviour, her body language, her tone of voice.. it was clear that she didn’t want to be there)

  • "Ooops, that was an obvious mistake!"

  • Acceptable.

  • Now this is a very neutral adjective, but it's a useful one!

  • It’s used when something is reasonable for what most people would think.

  • You know, it’s generally accepted or allowed.

  • So for example. "These days, flexible working hours are becoming more acceptable to employers."

  • "Please let me know if the fees are acceptable. If you're OK with it."

  • The opposite is unacceptable. So that’s a good way to start building on your vocabulary

  • - learning the opposites of these adjectives. Unacceptable.

  • "My hotel room was filthy! It's unacceptable!"

  • Impossible. Impossible.

  • If something is impossible, it can’t be done

  • OR it's extremely difficult to do.

  • "No, it’s impossible. It can't be done!"

  • "My boss gave me an impossible task."

  • "Adam is so badly behaved, it’s impossible to take him anywhere!"

  • "It’s impossible to become fluent in English, without practising with English speakers!"

  • Significant. Significant. Now this adjective can be used to say that something

  • is important or large.

  • And it’s often used to describe a change that's very noticeable.

  • For example. "It’s a significant building in the city."

  • "Significant changes have taken place since you left."

  • "There has been a significant increase in population over the last 10 years."

  • Ridiculous. Ridiculous. Hear the stress when I exaggerate?

  • That’s ridiculous!” Dic-diculous.

  • Also notice how this ‘u’ - is pronounced as /j/

  • NOT ri-di-coo-les but ri-dic-oo-les

  • Now this is a great adjective - it can be used to describe people too, but you need to be

  • careful with your facial expression and your tone because it can be a negative thing.

  • It can mean silly or stupid.

  • "That’s a ridiculous idea."

  • "You look ridiculous. Take it off!"

  • "It’s ridiculous that the shops close at 5pm!"

  • But it can also mean that something is crazy and it should be laughed at.

  • Same sentences again. "That’s a ridiculous idea!"

  • "Pfft! You look ridiculous!"

  • "It’s ridiculous that the shops close at 5pm!"

  • Did you pay attention to the difference there?

  • The tone and facial expression are really important so that the listener can understand what you mean.

  • Complicated. Complicated. Complicated.

  • Ooo this is such a good adjective to learn and use well!

  • You can use it when something is difficult to do, like you know, it’s hard.

  • Or it’s difficult to understand.

  • Or it could be difficult to deal with or to manage.

  • "The directions he gave were really complicated."

  • "Theyve been going out for years, but they have a complicated relationship."

  • So, they are my favourite adjectives for describing things in English!

  • What did you think?

  • And what are your favourite English adjectives?

  • Let me know in the comments! I'd love to hear from you!

  • And that’s it for this lesson!

  • But don’t forget to subscribe to my channel just over there

  • - there are new lessons every week here on the mmmEnglish Youtube channel.

  • In fact, why don’t you check out some of my other lessons, since youre already here!

  • Check out these two, right here!

  • Thanks for watching and I will see you in the next lesson! Bye for now!

Hello!

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A2 初級

お気に入りの形容詞8選|語彙力アップ|場所や物を表現する (8 Favourite English Adjectives | Improve Your Vocabulary | Describing Places & Things)

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    zhangying12370 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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