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  • The book of the prophet Isaiah. Isaiah lived in Jerusalem in the latter half of

  • Israel's Kingdom period and he spoke on God's behalf to the leaders of Jerusalem

  • and Judah. He spoke first of all a message of God's judgment; he warned

  • Israel's corrupt leaders that their rebellion against their covenant with

  • God would come at a cost, that God was going to use the great empires of

  • Assyria and after them Babylon to judge Jerusalem if they persisted in idolatry

  • and oppression of the poor, but that announcement was combined with a

  • message of hope. Isaiah believed deeply that God would one day fulfill all of

  • his covenant promises: that he would send a king from David's line to establish

  • God's kingdom (remember 2nd Samuel 7), that he would lead Israel in obedience

  • to all of the laws of the Covenant made at Mount Sinai (remember Exodus chapter 19),

  • and all of this was so that God's blessing and salvation would flow

  • outward to all of the nations like God promised to Abraham in Genesis chapter 12,

  • and it's this hope that compelled Isaiah to speak out against the

  • corruption and idolatry of Israel in his day. Now the book has a pretty complex literary

  • design, but there's one simple way to see how it all fits together: chapters 1 through 39

  • contain three large sections that develop Isaiah's warning of judgment on

  • Israel, and it all culminates in an event pointed to at the end of chapter 39 - the

  • fall of Jerusalem and the exile of the people to Babylon - but in chapters 1 to 39

  • there's also a message of hope that after the exile God's covenant promises

  • would all be fulfilled, and chapters 40 to 66 pick up that promise of hope and

  • develops it further. In this video we're just gonna focus on chapters 1 to 39. The

  • first main section focuses on Isaiah's vision of judgment and hope for

  • Jerusalem, and it begins as Isaiah accuses the city's leaders of Covenant rebellion,

  • idolatry, injustice, and God says he's going to judge the city by sending the

  • nations to conquer Israel. Isaiah says that this will be like a purifying fire

  • that burns away all that's worthless in Israel in order to create a new

  • Jerusalem that's populated by a remnant that has repented and turned back to God

  • and Isaiah says that that's when God's kingdom will come and all nations will

  • come to the temple in Jerusalem and learn

  • of God's justice, bringing about a age of universal peace and harmony. Now

  • it's this basic storyline of the old Jerusalem, purifying judgment into the

  • New Jerusalem, this is going to get repeated over and over throughout the

  • book getting filled in with increasing detail. So, at the center of this section

  • is Isaiah's grand vision of God sitting on his throne in the temple and he's

  • surrounded by these heavenly creatures that are shouting that God is holy holy

  • holy, and Isaiah suddenly realizes just how corrupt he and his people Israel are,

  • and he's certain that he's going to be destroyed by God's holiness, but he's not.

  • God holiness in the form of this burning coal comes and burns him, but not to destroy,

  • rather it purifies him from his sin. And as Isaiah ponders this strange experience

  • God commissions him with a very difficult task: he is to keep announcing

  • this coming judgment, but because Israel has reached a point of no return his

  • warnings are going to have a paradoxical effect of hardening the people. But Isaiah

  • is to trust God's plan. Israel is going to be chopped down like a tree and

  • left like a stump in a field, and that stump will itself be scorched and burned

  • but after all of that burning God says that this smoldering stump is a holy

  • seed that will survive into the future. It's a small sign of hope but who or

  • what is that Holy Seed? The rest of this section offers an answer. Isaiah

  • confronts Ahaz, a descendant of David and a King of Jerusalem, and he announces

  • his downfall. God says that it's the great empire of Assyria who will first

  • chop Israel down and devastate the land, but there's hope. Because of God's promise to

  • David he's going to send after this destruction a new king named

  • Emmanuel, which means "God with us", and Emanuel's Kingdom is going to set God's

  • people free from violent oppressive empires, and Isaiah describes this coming

  • king as a small shoot of new growth that will emerge from the old stump of David's

  • family. It's this king that's the holy seed from chapter six, and the king is

  • going to be empowered by God's Spirit to

  • rule over a new Jerusalem and bring justice for the poor and all nations

  • will look to this messianic king for guidance.

  • His kingdom will transform all creation bringing peace. Now you finish chapters

  • 1 through 12 with pretty good understanding of Isaiah's message of

  • judgment and hope, but when will this all happen? Isaiah saw another Empire arising

  • after Assyria, and thats Babylon, who would also attack Jerusalem and

  • actually succeed in destroying it, and that brings us in the next sections of

  • the book. So first we have a large collection of poems that explore God's

  • judgment and hope for the nations. We learn first of all of the fall of

  • Babylon and Israel's neighbors. Isaiah could see that a serious world power

  • would one day be replaced by the empire of Babylon, a nation even more

  • destructive an arrogant. Babylon's kings claimed that they were higher than all

  • other gods and so God vows to bring Babylon down. And not only Babylon, Isaiah

  • goes on to list Israel's neighbors accusing them all of the same kind of

  • pride and injustice, and he predicts their ultimate ruin. But remember for Isaiah

  • God's judgment is never the final word for Israel or the nations, and that

  • leads into the next section with a series of poems that tell a tale of two

  • cities. There's the lofty city that has exalted itself above God and become

  • corrupt and unjust. This city is an archetype of rebellious humanity and is

  • described with language that's all borrowed from Isaiah's earlier

  • descriptions of Jerusalem and Assyria and Babylon all put together. This city

  • is destined for ruin and one day is going to be replaced by the New

  • Jerusalem where God reigns as king over a redeemed humanity from all nations and

  • there's no more death or suffering. These chapters are the climax to this section

  • and it shows how Isaiah's message pointed far beyond his own day, it was a message

  • for all who are waiting for God to bring his justice on violent oppressive

  • kingdoms and bring his kingdom of justice and peace and healing love. The

  • following section return the focus to the rise and fall of Jerusalem, and first

  • we find a whole bunch of poems where Isaiah accuses Jerusalem's leaders for turning to Egypt

  • for military protection

  • against Assyria. He knows this will backfire and Isaiah says that only

  • trust in their God and repentance can save Israel now, which gets illustrated

  • by the following story about the rise of Hezekiah, king of Jerusalem. Just as Isaiah

  • predicted, the Assyrian armies come and try to attack the city and so Hezekiah

  • humbles himself before God and he prays for divine deliverance and the

  • city is miraculously saved overnight, but Hezekiah's rise is immediately

  • followed by his fall. So he hosts a delegation from Babylon and he tries to

  • impress them by showing everything in Jerusalem's treasury and temple and

  • palaces, it's clearly an effort to make another political alliance for

  • protection. Isaiah hears about this and he confronts Hezekiah for his foolishness.

  • He predicts that this ally will one day betray him and return as an enemy to

  • conquer Jerusalem, and we know from 2nd Kings chapters 24 and 25 that Isaiah

  • was right. Over a hundred years later Babylon would turn on Jerusalem, come and

  • destroy the city, its temple, and carry the Israelites away to exile in Babylon.

  • And so all of Isaiah's warnings of divine judgment in chapters 1 to 39 lead

  • up to this moment. He's shown to be a true prophet because it all came to pass

  • like he said. But remember the purpose of God's judgment was to purify Jerusalem

  • and bring the holy seed and messianic Kingdom over all nations, and it's that

  • hope that gets explored in the next part of the book, but for now that's what

  • Isaiah chapters 1 to 39 are all about.

The book of the prophet Isaiah. Isaiah lived in Jerusalem in the latter half of

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聖書を読むイザヤ書1-39 (Read Scripture: Isaiah 1-39)

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    sophia に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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