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  • Hi everyone! I'm Nick. Welcome to this video about 'who', 'which' and 'whom', joining sentences

  • together. Like, for example 'Will Smith won the egg and spoon race' and 'Will Smith is

  • the youngest', now we join the two sentences together by doing this 'Will Smith (comma)

  • who is the youngest (comma) won the egg and spoon race'. Hope you find it useful!

  • First we're looking at 'who' and 'whom' and here are three young people who've just taken

  • part in an egg and spoon race, that's when you have to balance an egg on a spoon and

  • run. And these are the three winners. The first one, the first is Will Smith, the first

  • is Will Smith (full stop). I'll write another sentence about Will: 'Will Smith (oops, sorry),

  • Will Smith wins first prize'. Now, if I want to put those two sentences together into one

  • what do I have to do? I have to turn the that into a comma because we know who Will is and

  • we write 'who' and then I use my grabber and I grab 'wins first prize' and I move it up

  • there and that's it and I'll just rub 'Will Smith' out, we don't need that anymore. 'The

  • first is Will Smith, who wins first prize'. I'll just write 'Will' there, he's the little

  • fella at the front.

  • Now let's go on to the next one. I'll write here 'the second, the second is Sabrina, the

  • second is Sabrina' and I'll just write 'Sabrina' there so that we know who she is, I'll put

  • a little arrow, that's it. And now my second sentence about Sabrina: 'We all know Sabrina,

  • we all know Sabrina as Sabby' (oops sorry), 'Sabby, we all know Sabrina as Sabby'. Now

  • I want to join those two sentences together so again I'll put a comma but this time I'm

  • going to write 'whom'. I'll say something about that in a minute. In the meantime I'll

  • take the first part of the sentence and move it up there, now I'll need to rub out the

  • (let's get it in the right place, there) now I need to rub out the 'w' and put a small

  • 'w' there, we don't need a capital, that's better - 'we all know'. 'The second is Sabrina,

  • whom we all know as Sabby'. So I can grab the 'as Sabby', I'll just rub out the Sabrina,

  • we don't need that anymore and then I'll grab my little grabber and put a box around 'Sabby'

  • and move it along the front there, and there it is: 'The second is Sabrina, whom we all

  • know as Sabby'.

  • Now notice it says 'whom' and in writing you should probably use the 'm' but I'll put then

  • 'm' in brackets there because the fact is that in speech we often don't use it. Right,

  • let's move on to the next one. 'The third is Jacob, the third is Jacob'. I'll just write

  • 'Jacob' up the top there so, I think you know who he is by now, but there he is 'third is

  • Jacob' and I'll write a second sentence about Jacob. 'We have a special prize, we have a

  • special prize for Jacob, for Jacob'. Now this one is a little different from the other two.

  • I'll start off by putting in the comma then I'm going to grab 'for' and move it that up,

  • get it in place then I'm going to write in the word 'whom' (notice it has to have an

  • 'm'), 'for whom' after a preposition and then I'm going to grab the first half, it won't

  • fit, it's too long so I'm going to have to move it down a bit, just to get it out of

  • the way. I'll grab the first half and put it up there 'for whom we have' and the second

  • half and move it up here 'a special prize', we rub that out and we replace the capital

  • 'W' with a small 'w': 'the third is Jacob, for whom we have a special prize'. And when

  • you're talking normally you could also say 'the third is Jacob, who we have a special

  • prize for', leave the preposition at the end.

  • Alright, let's go on to the next scene, now this is about 'which' and it's about 'things'.

  • So first of all we'll start with a quick drawing of the world, a bit of speed drawing that

  • Caroline did for me - there's Japan, Australia, Madagascar and England and Ireland, I'll just

  • make it a bit smaller because it's a bit big there. And now, look at this. We're putting

  • in some links, there's a little dotted line going over to Japan and then there's another

  • one going off to looks like India but it's a bit of a funny shape! And there's another

  • one going off somewhere, dunno where that one is going, oh it's going round the corner,

  • ok, that's going down to Australia, now it's going across to Africa, it's going a bit faster,

  • going across to America, across to Greenland, down to South America and back and back and

  • over and all over the place and faster and faster and faster and faster. And it's finished.

  • Phew! Now I'm going to make it a bit smaller and put it in the corner because I need to

  • make some space for some writing, so I'll just grab that whole thing reduce it in size,

  • put it over in the corner and put 'The Internet' at the top there. 'The Internet'.

  • Ok, now I'm going to show you three sets of sentences, here's the first pair, I wrote

  • this before, I can't write that fast! 'The internet is a wonderful tool' and 'the internet

  • enables global communication'. Now I'm going to join those two sentences together, first

  • thing I need to do is put a comma there, don't forget the comma and write 'which' because

  • we're talking about 'things' now. Now I grab the verb 'enables' and I put it up there then

  • I get my little eraser and I rub that out, we don't need that anymore and I'll just grab

  • 'global communication' and move it over there, there we are. 'The internet is a wonderful

  • tool, which enables global communication'.

  • Now let's move on to the next pair 'the internet is a wonderful tool', I'll use the same one

  • again and the second sentence 'we all use the internet'. Now rather similar process

  • but notice we use 'which' for both, there's no change so I'll put a comma and write 'which',

  • it's not like 'who' and 'whom' where we change from 'who' to 'whom', here it's 'which' and

  • 'which'. 'Which' and I'll grab 'we all use' and put it up there then I just need to get

  • my eraser and rub out, erase the 'W' and get my pen and write in the 'w' there, the small

  • 'w' and put a full stop at the end and get my little eraser again and erase 'the internet'.

  • So there we are. 'The internet is a wonderful tool, which we all use'.

  • Now the last pair of sentences 'Tim Berners Lee invented the internet', did you know that?

  • He was working in Cern in Switzerland at the time and 'we all grateful for Tim's invention'.

  • And this is going to be similar we're going to put a comma there and remember there's

  • a preposition there 'for' so the first thing I'm gonna do is grab the preposition 'for'

  • and take it up there, 'for', ok. Then I'm going to write, get my pen, and I'm gonna

  • write 'which', here we go 'which', ok that's it and then I'll just grab that phrase 'we

  • are all grateful' and move it up there 'for which we are all grateful'. I need to erase

  • the capital 'W' and get rid of all of that, we don't need that now and get my pen and

  • write in 'we' and put the full stop. And we're done. 'Tim Berners Lee invented the internet,

  • for which we are all grateful'. One last thing who's that? It's Tim Berners Lee! I thought

  • you might like to see a picture of him.

  • Alright, that's all for now, bye bye, see you later!

Hi everyone! I'm Nick. Welcome to this video about 'who', 'which' and 'whom', joining sentences

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英語を学ぶ - センテンス。関係文2(誰が、誰が、誰が、誰が、どのような関係にあるか (Learn English - Sentences: Relative Clauses 2 (who, whom, which))

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    Claudia に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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