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  • He's gonna take you back to the past

  • To play the shitty games that suck ass

  • He'd rather have a buffalo

  • Take a diarrhea dump in his ear

  • He'd rather eat the rotten asshole

  • Of a roadkill skunk and down it with beer

  • He's the angriest gamer you've ever heard

  • He's the Angry Nintendo Nerd

  • He's the Angry Atari Sega Nerd

  • He's the Angry Video Game Nerd

  • Atari... ah, yes. A name so dearly loved from the golden age of history.

  • A magical time when there was no Internet, no cell phones,

  • just electronic video games.

  • OK, it was the dark ages, but life was simple.

  • Atari was the prime innovator in video arcades, home computers,

  • and home video game consoles.

  • The Atari 2600 revolutionized the game industry.

  • It made popular the use of changeable cartridges and plug-in controllers.

  • The games were primitive and choppy,

  • but back in those days they were fascinating.

  • But then there came competition: the Odyssey 2, Intellivision, ColecoVision--

  • EVERYBODY was trying to take advantage of the video gaming craze.

  • It wasn't like today, where you have a choice of only three consoles.

  • Back then, there were so many fucking video game systems it made your head spin.

  • Also, there wasn't any way to know which games were good and which games were bad,

  • so consumers were alienated by an overblown market.

  • So Atari made another console, the 5200.

  • It replaced the TV/game switch with an automatic switch box.

  • It also tried to eliminate the use of wires

  • by plugging the AC adapter directly into the switch box.

  • But that only made it more confusing.

  • The controllers had a pause button, which was new at the time,

  • but the joysticks were faulty and unreliable.

  • What it all came down to, the 5200 was an oversize piece of shit.

  • I made a whole video about it; that's how much that sucks.

  • Following the video game crash of 1983 and '84,

  • Nintendo and Sega would rise from the ashes,

  • once again revolutionizing the market,

  • and ushering in a new generation of gaming.

  • Atari threw their hat into the ring again with the 7800.

  • This one resolved all the issues with the 5200.

  • The controller ports allowed you to use the same controllers as the 2600,

  • and it was also backwards-compatible with the 2600 games.

  • The 7800 games featured better graphics,

  • but didn't have much to offer in comparison with Nintendo.

  • So, once again, it bit the dust.

  • Afterwards, Atari stopped naming their consoles after numbers,

  • and instead started naming them after cats.

  • The Atari Lynx was the first handheld console that was in color.

  • But it found itself sandwiched between the more successful portable game systems:

  • the Nintendo Game Boy and Sega Game Gear.

  • Though the Lynx was pretty cool, gamers found it to be a little bulky,

  • even with the Lynx 2, the new design model.

  • The Lynx 1 took more batteries and drained them faster than the Game Boy.

  • Also, it didn't have the same third-party support as the others,

  • so, it lost again.

  • Meanwhile, Nintendo and Sega were in steady competition.

  • But whether anyone preferred the NES library of games

  • or the Sega Genesis games was a matter of opinion.

  • However, the debate amongst the fans and Sega's marketing campaign

  • came down to one simple fact:

  • the Genesis was 16-bit, and the NES was only 8.

  • This started a little trend I like to call the Bit Wars.

  • Nobody ever talked about bits before that,

  • and nobody ever talked about bits since.

  • And what are bits, anyway? Nobody knew, they're just bits!

  • Try explaining that to your parents.

  • Oh, I want a Super Nintendo for Christmas!

  • Don't you already have a Nintendo?

  • Yeah, but this one's 16-bit!

  • What's that?

  • I don't know.

  • Other than it meaning the graphics were better, that's all we cared about.

  • But the Bit Wars brought down our sense of gaming to numbers.

  • People began to care more about the graphics

  • and less about the actual gameplay.

  • It was to the point that some consoles

  • even used the number of bits in their name,

  • like the TurboGrafx-16 and the Nintendo 64.

  • But in 1993, one console would come along

  • to remind us that bits aren't everything.

  • It was the Atari Jaguar,

  • and it was announced as the first 64-bit game system.

  • We were like, damn! 64? That's like, four times the bits!

  • Even the official advertising slogan said "Do The Math".

  • But beyond its vicious exterior

  • and rotating Jaguar cube on the startup screen,

  • it had little to offer.

  • Gamers who were suckered in found a mediocre library of games,

  • and graphics that failed to impress.

  • The controllers were huge, and they had keypads,

  • much like the ColecoVision and Intellivision.

  • And like those, there were overlays, which sometimes come in handy,

  • but for most games, they're unnecessary.

  • The cartridges don't have end labels, so I had to make my own.

  • Seriously, is there any good reason not to have end labels?

  • I guess instead they have these weird handles.

  • What's the point? Do I really need that extra grip?

  • None of the other toploading consoles had that.

  • It's like, oh, aw, God, I can't get the game out. Oh, God, I need a handle.

  • Man, I just can't get a grip. Gotta have a handle.

  • And speaking of toploading consoles, notice how they all have a door.

  • That's to protect from dust. That's a good thing.

  • But the Jaguar doesn't have that. Why not?

  • But before I can review any games, we need to discuss the graphics.

  • This is Zool 2.

  • Now, without criticizing the game, it's a typical sidescroller.

  • But look at it. The graphics don't look any better than Sonic the Hedgehog,

  • and that was 16-bit.

  • Maybe a bad choice of games,

  • so let's give it the benefit of the doubt and try something else.

  • Brutal Sports Football. Another OK game.

  • Once again, the graphics aren't too impressive.

  • Where'd the other 48 bits go?

  • Let's try Checkered Flag.

  • This showcases the graphic capabilities a little more,

  • just the fact that it puts you into a three-dimensional environment.

  • But compare it to F-Zero on Super Nintendo:

  • 48 bits less, but a million times more appealing to the eye.

  • Now, look at Cybermorph.

  • It's a flying game with polygon graphics.

  • Going back to Super NES one more time, look at Star Fox.

  • Are we missing something here?

  • For a game console that claims to be 64-bit,

  • it really doesn't show a whole lot of improvement.

  • This caused a lot of debate amongst gamers

  • whether or not it really was 64-bit.

  • It's a topic that usually overshadows the Jaguar itself,

  • but it's something that we just need to get out of the way.

  • Well, we do know that Atari was originally planning a 32-bit system

  • called the Panther, but decided to skip it and leap ahead.

  • The Jaguar still used a 32-bit graphic processing unit,

  • but through a combination of other processors somehow added up to 64.

  • It's technical and confusing, but the point is, the Jaguar was a rare species,

  • not built like most game consoles.

  • That made it harder for programmers to develop games on it,

  • and as a result, many games didn't utilize its full capabilities,

  • whatever they could've been.

  • So I've given you a little history of Atari and how it tried to win the Bit Wars.

  • Now that we got that out of the way, check in for part two,

  • and we'll actually play some Jaguar games.

  • Or if you wanna be cool, you say, "play some JAG!"

  • Check in for part two and we'll play some Jag!

He's gonna take you back to the past

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アタリ・ジャガー(前編)〜怒りのビデオゲームオタク〜 第65話 (Atari Jaguar (Part 1) - Angry Video Game Nerd - Episode 65)

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    eaglekuo に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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