Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

AI 自動生成字幕
  • Transcriber:

    トランスクライバー

  • We live in a culture

    私たちは文化の中で生きている

  • that doesn't take mental health issues seriously.

    メンタルヘルスの問題を真剣に考えないような

  • There's a lot of stigma.

    スティグマがあるんです。

  • Some people tell you to just suck it up,

    ただ吸えと言う人もいます。

  • or get it together, or to stop worrying,

    とか、しっかりしろとか、心配するのはやめようとか。

  • or that it's all in your head.

    とか、「気のせいだ」とか。

  • But I'm here to tell you that anxiety disorders,

    しかし、私はここで不安障害をお伝えします。

  • they're as real as diabetes.

    糖尿病と同じように現実的なものです。

  • (Music)

    (音楽)

  • [Body Stuff with Dr. Jen Gunter]

    [ジェン・ガンター博士のボディ・スタッフ】のページです。]

  • Hi again.

    またまたこんにちは。

  • It's Dr. Jen,

    ジェン先生です。

  • and I've noticed something with my patients.

    そして、患者さんに気づいたことがあります。

  • They often describe to me

    彼らはよく私に説明してくれます。

  • some classic symptoms of an anxiety disorder.

    不安障害の典型的な症状がいくつかある。

  • Constant worry, trouble sleeping,

    心配事が絶えない、眠れない。

  • tense muscles and struggle with concentrating.

    筋肉が緊張して、集中力が続かない。

  • But they aren't getting treatment.

    でも、治療を受けていないんです。

  • There's a lot of issues with mental-health care in this country.

    この国では、メンタルヘルスのケアに多くの問題があるんだ。

  • Some people don't have insurance that would cover it.

    それをカバーするような保険に加入していない人もいる。

  • Some have been dismissed or minimized in the past,

    過去に却下されたり、最小限に抑えられたりしたものもあります。

  • and don't think seeking help will do any good.

    と言って、助けを求めても何もいいことはないと思っている。

  • Some worry about the stigma

    スティグマを心配する声も

  • and whether it could affect future jobs or relationships.

    とか、将来の仕事や人間関係に影響を与える可能性があるかとか。

  • But severe anxiety isn't a moral or personal failing.

    しかし、重度の不安は道徳や個人の失敗ではありません。

  • It's a health problem,

    健康上の問題です。

  • just like strep throat or diabetes.

    溶連菌や糖尿病と同じように。

  • It needs to be treated with the same kind of seriousness.

    それと同じような真剣さが必要なのです。

  • Before we can talk about anxiety disorders,

    不安障害について語る前に

  • let's talk about anxiety itself.

    では、不安そのものについてお話ししましょう。

  • Anxiety is the very real and normal emotion

    不安は、非常に現実的で正常な感情である

  • we feel in a stressful situation.

    ストレスの多い状況で感じる

  • It's related to fear.

    それは恐怖と関係している。

  • But while fear is a response to an immediate threat

    しかし、恐怖は差し迫った脅威に対する反応であるのに対し

  • that quickly subsides,

    が、すぐに収まる。

  • anxiety is a response to more uncertain threats

    不安は、より不確実な脅威に対する反応である

  • that tends to last much longer.

    より長く使えるようになりました。

  • It's all part of the threat detection system,

    全ては脅威を検知するシステムの一部なのです。

  • which all animals have to some degree,

    すべての動物が多少なりとも持っている

  • to help protect us from predators.

    外敵から私たちを守るために

  • Anxiety starts in the brain's amygdala,

    不安は脳の扁桃体から始まる。

  • a pair of almond-sized nerve bundles

    一対のアーモンドの神経束

  • that alert other areas of the brain to be ready for defensive action.

    脳の他の部位に防御行動の準備をするように警告するものです。

  • Next, the hypothalamus relays the signal,

    次に、視床下部がその信号を中継する。

  • setting off what we call the stress response in our body.

    というストレス反応を起こす。

  • Our muscles tense,

    私たちの筋肉は緊張しています。

  • our breathing and heart rate increase

    呼吸と心拍数が増加する

  • and our blood pressure rises.

    と血圧が上がります。

  • Areas in the brain stem kick in

    脳幹の領域が機能する

  • and put you in a state of high alertness.

    で、高い覚醒状態にします。

  • This is the fight-or-flight response.

    これが「闘争・逃走反応」です。

  • There are ways the fight-or-flight response

    闘争・逃走反応のやり方がある

  • is kept somewhat in check,

    はある程度抑えられています。

  • with an area of higher-level thinking called the ventromedial prefrontal cortex.

    を、前頭葉の内側と呼ばれる高次の思考を司る領域と結合させる。

  • It works like this.

    仕組みはこうです。

  • If a person sees something they think is dangerous, like a tiger,

    人が虎のような危険だと思うものを見た場合。

  • that sends a signal to the amygdala, saying "it's time to run."

    扁桃体に信号を送り、"逃げる時だ "と言っているのです。

  • The ventromedial prefrontal cortex can say to the amygdala,

    腹内側前頭前皮質は、扁桃体に言うことができます。

  • "Hey, look. The tiger's in a cage.

    "おい、見ろよ。虎は檻の中だ

  • You know what a cage is? They can't escape from a cage.

    檻って知ってる?檻の中からは逃げられない。

  • It's OK to calm down."

    落ち着いていいんだよ。"

  • It's a feedback loop that can help keep the response in check.

    それがフィードバックループとなり、反応を抑えることができるのです。

  • The hippocampus is also involved.

    海馬も関与している。

  • It provides context, saying things like,

    などと言いながら、文脈を提供しています。

  • "Hey, we've seen tigers in cages before.

    "おい、檻の中の虎は見たことあるぞ。

  • We're in a zoo. You are extra safe."

    動物園の中なんだから。あなたは特別に安全です。"

  • With anxiety,

    不安を抱えながら。

  • these threat-detection systems and mechanisms that reduce or inhibit them

    これらの脅威を検知する仕組みと、それを低減・抑制する仕組み。

  • are functioning incorrectly

    が正しく機能していない

  • and cause us to worry about the future and our safety in it.

    と、未来とそこでの安全を心配するようになるのです。

  • But for many people, it goes into overdrive.

    しかし、多くの人にとって、それはオーバードライブになる。

  • They experience persistent pervasive anxiety

    持続的な広範な不安を経験する

  • that disrupts work, school and relationships

    仕事、学校、人間関係に支障をきたすような

  • and leads them to avoid situations that may trigger symptoms.

    と、症状の引き金になりそうな状況を避けるように誘導します。

  • Anxiety disorders are not at all uncommon.

    不安障害は決して珍しい病気ではありません。

  • Based on data from the World Mental Health Survey,

    World Mental Health Surveyのデータに基づく。

  • researchers estimate that about 16 percent of individuals

    の研究者は、個人の約16パーセントが

  • currently have or have had an anxiety disorder.

    現在、不安障害である、または過去に不安障害であった。

  • These include social anxiety disorder,

    この中には、社会不安障害も含まれます。

  • panic disorder, agoraphobia and phobias.

    パニック障害、広場恐怖症、恐怖症。

  • Studies have shown that people with anxiety disorders

    研究により、不安障害のある人は

  • don't just have a different way of reacting to stress.

    は、ストレスに対する反応の仕方が違うだけではありません。

  • There may be actual differences in how their brain is working.

    実際に脳の働きに違いがあるのかもしれません。

  • One model describes possible mix-ups

    あるモデルでは、混同の可能性を説明しています。

  • in the connections between the amygdala and other parts of the brain.

    扁桃体と脳の他の部分との間の接続において

  • The pathways that signal anxiety become stronger.

    不安を知らせる経路が強くなる。

  • And the more anxiety you have, the stronger the pathways become,

    そして、不安が大きければ大きいほど、その経路は強くなります。

  • and it becomes a vicious cycle.

    と悪循環に陥ってしまう。

  • The good news is there's treatment for anxiety,

    良い知らせは、不安に対する治療法があるということです。

  • and that you don't have to suffer.

    そして、苦しまなくていいということ。

  • Remember, this isn't about weakness.

    覚えておいてほしいのは、これは弱さの話ではないということです。

  • It's about changing brain patterns,

    それは、脳のパターンを変えることです。

  • and research shows that our brains

    であり、研究によれば、私たちの脳は

  • have the ability to reorganize and form new connections

    新しい結合を形成し、再編成する能力がある

  • all throughout our lives.

    私たちは生涯を通じて

  • A good first step is to do the basics.

    まずは基本をしっかりやることです。

  • Eat a balanced diet,

    バランスの良い食事をする。

  • exercise regularly

    運動する

  • and get plenty of sleep,

    と睡眠を十分にとることです。

  • as your mind is part of your body.

    心も体の一部であるように

  • It might also help to try meditation.

    また、瞑想をしてみるのもいいかもしれません。

  • Instead of our heart rate rising and our body tensing,

    心拍数が上がり、体が緊張するのではなく

  • with mindfulness and breathing,

    マインドフルネスと呼吸で

  • we can slow down the fight-or-flight response

    闘争・逃走の反応を遅らせることができる。

  • and improve how we feel in the moment.

    そして、その瞬間の気持ちを向上させる。

  • Cognitive behavioral therapy, a form of talk therapy,

    トークセラピーの一種である認知行動療法。

  • can also be fantastic.

    も素晴らしいものです。

  • In it, you learn to identify upsetting thoughts

    その中で、動揺している思考を特定することを学びます。

  • and determine whether they're realistic.

    と現実的かどうかを判断します。

  • Over time, cognitive behavioral therapy can rebuild those neural pathways

    認知行動療法は、時間をかけて、その神経回路を再構築することができます。

  • that tamp down the anxiety response.

    不安反応を抑えることができます。

  • Medication can also give relief,

    薬で緩和することもできます。

  • in both the short-term and the long-term.

    短期的にも長期的にも

  • In the short-term, anti-anxiety drugs

    短期的には、抗不安薬

  • can down-regulate the threat-detection mechanisms

    脅威を検知するメカニズムをダウンレギュレートすることができます。

  • that are going into overdrive.

    オーバードライブに入るような

  • Studies have shown that both long-term medications

    研究により、長期的な薬物療法の両方が

  • and cognitive behavioral therapy

    と認知行動療法

  • can reduce that overreactivity of the amygdala

    扁桃体の過剰な反応を抑制することができます。

  • we see an anxiety disorders.

    不安障害を見る。

  • High blood pressure and diabetes,

    高血圧、糖尿病

  • they can be treated or managed over time.

    これらは、時間をかけて治療または管理することができます。

  • And the same is true for an anxiety disorder too.

    そして、不安障害もまた同じです。

Transcriber:

トランスクライバー

字幕と単語
AI 自動生成字幕

ワンタップで英和辞典検索 単語をクリックすると、意味が表示されます

B1 中級 日本語 TED 不安 障害 反応 扁桃 脅威

ノーマル(What's normal anxiety -- and what's an anxiety disorder? | Body Stuff with Dr. Jen Gunter)

  • 8 1
    たらこ に公開 2022 年 02 月 17 日
動画の中の単語