Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • Today on QUICK ESSENTIALS, I want to show you an odd little thing you need to know about color.

  • This kinda blew my mind when I first learned about it.

  • First though, there are 3 different terms we need to be familiar with.

  • This area of the color picker is where you select your hue.

  • Hue is just the color name: red, green, blue, etc.

  • Going horizontally across the color picker is how you select saturation.

  • Saturation is the amount of chroma, or intensity, of a color.

  • And going vertically like this will affect value.

  • Value is how light or dark a color is.

  • Some color pickers look like this, which is largely the same thing,

  • although there are some implications we'll look at later in this video.

  • OK, so a color is always tied to a value.

  • Even though these are two different hues, with two different levels of saturation,

  • I think it's pretty easy to see that the top one is lighter, and the bottom one is darker.

  • And stripping away the saturation, we can easily see where the values of those two colors lie.

  • And because it's value - not color - that makes a picture readable,

  • value is one of the most important fundamentals of painting.

  • No matter what you do with hue and saturation, your decisions there always boil down to value.

  • Now, it's very tempting to think that hue and saturation are independent of value.

  • You know, like, value is determined by this vertical placement ...

  • and then you plug in hue and saturation after.

  • But that is actually quite far from the truth!

  • In fact, every single aspect of your color choices cascades down and affects value.

  • I'll show you an example with saturation first.

  • Here's a color picker and a canvas.

  • I'll use this red hue here.

  • I'll start with a perfectly desaturated version of that, and paint a little swatch.

  • Now, I want to increase the saturation,

  • while staying at the same brightness level on the color picker.

  • So here's another swatch ... change the saturation level ... here's another swatch ...

  • and repeat this process until the end.

  • OK, now check this out: I'm going to convert this to black and white.

  • And the values are different.

  • Adding saturation decreased value!

  • Even though, as I sample these, Photoshop is telling me I'm at the same brightness level!

  • Again, it was a straight line all the way across that color picker.

  • And that's where this triangular pickers are a little bit more visually accurate.

  • This is Corel Painter's color picker, by the way.

  • Its shape implicitly tells us that this value is lighter than this value.

  • And, remember how Photoshop's brightness was not reflecting our value change?

  • On this color picker, as I slide through saturation on the same line,

  • You can see the value slider is now updating.

  • This is a step forward, although it's still not totally accurate.

  • I'll show you why in just a second...

  • but first I want to point out that not all color pickers are made equal!

  • This is Photoshop's "Coolorus" plugin, which is also a triangular picker.

  • (And I like this plugin, by the way!)

  • But here I am doing that same color move...

  • But on this one the value slider stays locked at 100.

  • It's almost like different color pickers are measuring different properties.

  • OK, time to move onto how hue affects value - and THIS is what really blew my mind.

  • So, there's our example with red, at the top.

  • And I'm re-doing the process now with this blue color.

  • And I'm using the same brightness value on this blue as I did on the red.

  • OK so there's our two swatch panels.

  • Watch what happens now as I switch this to grayscale.

  • Your eyes do not deceive you: different colors saturate to different values!

  • This is a crucial piece in the puzzle of understanding color!

  • It's also the source of some digital confusion.

  • Back here in Painter, we've already seen how value does get reduced as I make this move ...

  • However, the reason it's not entirely accurate is that Painter reduces the value of every hue equally.

  • As we've just seen, that's not what actually occurs.

  • In fact, check this out: using this violet color I'll pick a value at 50% on the grayscale.

  • I'll paint a swatch.

  • Now I'll move the color picker up to full brightness, but also full saturation.

  • Paint another swatch, and, are you ready? I'm going to change this to black and white.

  • That is kinda crazy.

  • We traveled halfway lighter on the color picker, and got a darker value!

  • Lighter = darker, dogs 'n cats living together!

  • Now, this is not true for every color, of course.

  • This yellow, for instance, does not get very dark when saturated.

  • I've got my two swatches here, same as with the violet color...

  • We switch to black and white, and this is more intuitive!

  • Yup. That's the stuff that blew my mind.

  • OK, so I've made a chart for you, to act as an overall reference for this.

  • I've got it on two layers here.

  • The first layer is simply a chart with all the hues and various degrees of saturation.

  • And then layer two, of course, is those saturation levels in grayscale.

  • And this is not every granular hue change, but these, to me, are where the significant changes lie.

  • You can find the download link in the description.

  • So, OK, some more digital confusion, I'm afraid...

  • Let's say this represents a painting I want to check in grayscale.

  • The absolute wrong way to do it is to use the Hue/Saturation adjustment.

  • When I strip the saturation here, it just evenly levels everything out,

  • which is completely inaccurate.

  • This is Photoshop, but the same thing happens in Krita ...

  • ... in Painter ...

  • ... and in Clip Studio Paint.

  • So, don't use the Hue/Saturation box to check values.

  • One reliable way to do it is to simply switch the color space to Grayscale.

  • But the drawback is, in Grayscale mode, we can't paint in color anymore...

  • so, I usually don't do it that way.

  • A quick and dirty way to do it is to make a new layer, fill it with white ...

  • And set that layer to 'color' mode.

  • This works across multiple apps, it's pretty reliable,

  • though I do think the contrast is exaggerated slightly.

  • My favorite way to check values - and this is exclusive to Photoshop, unfortuantely...

  • Go up to View -> Proof Setup -> Custom

  • Then click the dropdown here and set it to 'Dot Gain 20%'

  • Now you can press CNTRL + Y to toggle between an accurate grayscale view, and color.

  • And by the way, this stuff happens with real pigments too. It's not just digital!

  • Here are swatches of these very bright and saturated acrylic pigments.

  • When I switch this frame to grayscale, we get the same value behavior.

  • All right, I want to show you how this color theory actually influences my painting.

  • Here's a spooky little sketch I did in October...

  • There's a lot of gray-ish colors in it,

  • So I wanted this area here to have a punch of color.

  • This is the particular blue that I chose for that.

  • And that color choice was directly influenced by the fact that that blue gives some of the darker values when saturated.

  • That way I could have what appears to be a bright, punchy color ...

  • But, when converted to grayscale, it's a sufficiently dark value.

  • Which I'm hoping helps pop the lighter values on the focal point next to it.

  • On the opposite end of the scale...

  • I wanted to have bright colors that would NOT turn into dark values.

  • So my palette choice consisted largely of these colors,

  • which tend to hold onto their light values when saturated.

  • This color theory is always in the back of my mind when I paint.

  • At this point you might ask, "Why does this happen? I mean, scientifically?"

  • Well ... I don't know.

  • But I suspect it might have something to do with the wavelengths of color.

  • You've probably heard this acronym: ROY G BIV

  • These are descending measurements of the wavelength each color occupies.

  • The wavelengths roughly line up with the value chart ... but it's not perfect.

  • For example, red is not the lightest value when saturated.

  • So ... I don't know.

  • Maybe it's a good question for Captain Disillusion.

  • He's got a knack for explaining this stuff!

  • ...if only he knew about this channel...

  • ...I dunno ... is that too far fetched? *crowd gasp*

  • Anyway, I hope this has been an eye opener!

  • Also, I have lots of longer classes where I apply color theory, and show my process from start to finish!

  • Talk about painting fundamentals, and how to apply them to your work ...

  • and lots more.

  • You can find all that at www.marcobucciartstore.com

  • That about wraps it up! I'll see you in the next video!

Today on QUICK ESSENTIALS, I want to show you an odd little thing you need to know about color.

字幕と単語

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

A1 初級

Something strange you should know about color | QUICK ESSENTIALS

  • 72 2
    陳奕愷 に公開 2021 年 10 月 07 日
動画の中の単語