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  • Hi.

  • I'm Vanessa from SpeakEnglishWithVanessa.com.

  • Are you ready to test your vocabulary?

  • Let's get started.

  • Today we're going to talk about 15 advanced vocabulary words that you'll definitely hear

  • in daily conversation.

  • If you enjoyed my first advanced vocabulary quiz, you can watch it up here.

  • If you haven't enjoyed it yet, watch out because you might see some of these words in this

  • quiz as well.

  • I challenge you to test yourself.

  • If there's a word that you don't know, write it down.

  • Try to make your own sentence with it.

  • Read it out loud.

  • Try to repeat it so that it sticks in your memory.

  • You'll have three seconds to guess each answer before I explain.

  • Let's get started.

  • Number one: I don't know why it's taking so long to ... the house across the street.

  • I don't know why it's taking so long to renovate the house across the street.

  • I don't know why it's taking so long to relegate the house across the street.

  • Which one is the correct answer?

  • You have three seconds.

  • Two, one.

  • The correct answer is, I don't know why it's taking so long to renovate the house across

  • the street.

  • This is a true story.

  • The house across the street has been getting renovated for minimum two years.

  • Renovate means that they're fixing it up.

  • There's already a house.

  • They're not building a new house, but they've repainted it.

  • They put a new porch on it.

  • They painted it again.

  • They fixed up some of the outside of it.

  • They renovated the house.

  • We usually use this word in association with buildings or houses.

  • That's the most common way that you'll see it.

  • Number two, the worst bosses will ... everything that you do.

  • The worst bosses will subjugate everything that you do, or the worst bosses will scrutinize

  • everything that you do?

  • Which one is the correct answer?

  • Three, two, one.

  • The worst bosses will scrutinize everything that you do.

  • This beautiful word scrutinize means to look carefully at something.

  • But, it's not just looking carefully.

  • It's a good idea to look carefully at what your employees are doing, but this often means

  • critically are negatively.

  • They're scrutinizing.

  • They're picking apart every little detail of what you do.

  • If you've had a boss like this, you know how annoying it is.

  • The worst bosses scrutinize every little thing.

  • They don't trust their employees at all.

  • They scrutinize their employees.

  • Number three: Have you ever had a ... friend who just won't go home even though you've

  • already done the dishes and brushed your teeth for bed?

  • Have you ever had a chatty friend who just won't go home?

  • Have you ever had a clingy friend who just won't go home?

  • Which is the best word, chatty or clingy?

  • Three, two, one.

  • Have you ever had a clingy friend who just won't go home no matter what you do?

  • Clingy is a beautiful adjective, and it means stuck like glue, usually in a negative way.

  • When we're talking about a person, it means that you want them to go away, but they just

  • won't go away.

  • So, we could say that she is a clingy person.

  • She's always with you.

  • How are you doing?

  • What are you doing?

  • Can I get together?

  • Can I come to your house today?

  • And then she won't leave.

  • She's clingy.

  • We could also talk about items being clingy.

  • Maybe the skirt was clinging to her tights.

  • It was a clingy skirt.

  • It's kind of sticking.

  • That's kind of annoying when it's a skirt, but it's not always a negative thing.

  • Maybe the cling wrap, or we call this sometimes plastic wrap, is clingy.

  • It sticks to the bowl, and that's exactly what you want.

  • So, it means sticking.

  • Number four: When someone's driving poorly, I wonder if honking will ... the problem or

  • help.

  • I wonder if honking will exacerbate the problem or help.

  • I wonder if honking will examine the problem or help.

  • I'll give you three seconds.

  • Three, two, one.

  • We have a clue in this sentence.

  • Because we have the word or help, we know that the key word we're looking for is the

  • opposite of help.

  • If you're taking an English exam, this is great to look for these key words.

  • We have our word, that we're going to talk about in just a second, or help.

  • So, it needs to be the opposite of help.

  • Sometimes when I see poor driving, I wonder if honking my horn will exacerbate the problem

  • or help.

  • Can you guess what the word exacerbate means?

  • It means make it worse.

  • It's not helping.

  • Sometimes when someone cuts in front of me and I honk my horn, I wonder if they will

  • drive correctly or if it will just scare them, and all of a sudden they'll drive even worse.

  • Sometimes I wonder this to myself.

  • It happened last week that someone cut in front of me and I honked my horn, and they

  • got in the correct lane and it was fine.

  • But sometimes I'm worried that when I honk my horn it will exacerbate the problem, make

  • it worse because that person will just be surprised and then veer off the road.

  • Number five: I'm usually ... when I walk alone at night.

  • I'm usually wary when I walk alone at night or I'm usually wiry when I walk alone at night?

  • There's only one difference between these two words and that's the vowel.

  • Which one is it?

  • Three, two, one.

  • I'm usually wary when I walk alone at night.

  • This just means careful, cautious.

  • I'm usually wary.

  • I look around me.

  • I try to stay alert because I want to stay safe.

  • I'm usually wary, cautious of my surroundings when I walk alone at night.

  • Make sure that you pronounce this word correctly, wary.

  • It kind of sounds like wear, I'm wearing clothes, wear, and then you just add E at the end,

  • wary.

  • If you're in the Fearless Fluency Club, you already know this word because we talked about

  • it a couple months ago.

  • If you're not in the Fearless Fluency Club, you can click up here to learn more with me

  • every month and learn great vocabulary expressions like the ones in this lesson.

  • Number six: I was surprised that she was ... about doing the dishes because she seemed so put

  • together in her life.

  • I was surprised that she was ... about the dishes.

  • I was surprised that she was testy about doing the dishes.

  • I was surprised that she was negligent about doing the dishes.

  • In this sentence, maybe you don't know what put together means.

  • That's going to be a key element here, but we can imagine in our heads something that

  • is put together.

  • When you have a puzzle and it's put together, it means it's completed.

  • It's finished.

  • It looks nice.

  • So, we can kind of piece together the rest of that sentence to guess what our key word

  • is here.

  • Let me tell you, in three, two, one.

  • I was surprised she was negligent about doing the dishes.

  • Negligent.

  • What does this word sound like?

  • Do you know the word neglect?

  • This means that you're forgetting something.

  • If you were neglected as a child, this means that your parents didn't pay attention to

  • you.

  • They forgot you.

  • They ignored you.

  • We can kind of imagine that for the dishes that she was negligent about the dishes.

  • The word negligent means that you often forget important tasks.

  • In this situation, we have someone who is put together.

  • They're organized.

  • It seems like they always know what's going on.

  • They're never confused, or worried, or uncertain.

  • They are put together.

  • But surprisingly, she is negligent about the dishes.

  • She has tons of dishes in her sink.

  • We can say that she often forgets important tasks.

  • She is negligent.

  • Number seven: We rented a ... house in the English countryside.

  • We rented a quaint house in the English countryside or we rented a tactful house in the English

  • countryside?

  • Which of these words feels the most correct?

  • I'll give you three seconds.

  • Three, two, one.

  • We rented a quaint house in the English countryside.

  • The word quaint means cute in kind of an old fashioned way.

  • So, it kind of makes us think about simple times, a long time ago, maybe our grandparents

  • or hundreds and hundreds of years ago, this beautiful, cute little house.

  • This is something that seems typical in the English countryside.

  • There are quaint houses.

  • This is kind of a stereotype, but you can use that word quaint to talk about somewhere

  • that you went on vacation.

  • Oh, I love this little village.

  • It's so quaint.

  • It's cute.

  • Number eight: I often wish that architecture in the US was more ... pleasing.

  • I often wish that architecture in the US was more discretely pleasing or I often wish that

  • architecture in the US was more aesthetically pleasing?

  • Which of these two words is correct?

  • Three, two, one.

  • The answer is I often wish that architecture in the US was more authentically pleasing.

  • Aesthetically means something to do with beauty.

  • Oh, it's so aesthetically pleasing to see quaint, old houses.

  • Or if you've ever visited Europe and you've seen those beautiful buildings that have existed

  • for hundreds of years, it is aesthetically pleasing.

  • That means it's pleasing to your eyes.

  • It looks beautiful.

  • All of those colors together in your dress are so aesthetically pleasing.

  • We often use those two words together, aesthetically pleasing.

  • But on the other hand, architecture in the US isn't really known for being aesthetically

  • pleasing.

  • Unless you go to some older areas of New York, most places in the US just look like this.

  • Just some big, box stores with big parking lots.

  • Some downtown areas are kind of cute, but in general, architecture in the US is not

  • so aesthetically pleasing, and I wish it was.

  • Number nine, I'm sure this is not you.

  • Sometimes people can be rude online because it's easy to be ... Sometimes people can be

  • rude online because it's easy to be anonymous or sometimes people can be rude online because

  • it's easy to be assimilated?

  • Which of these two words is correct?

  • Three, two, one.

  • Sometimes, unfortunately, people can be rude online because it's easy to be anonymous.

  • Anonymous, this means that your identity is hidden.

  • Maybe you just have a screen name.

  • Nobody knows who you are.

  • You can say whatever you want, so it's easy to be rude online.

  • Did you recognize this word, assimilated, from the first vocabulary test?

  • I hope so.

  • If not, make sure you go watch it.

  • Number 10: Do you think that social media ... content that you see?

  • Do you think that social media censors content that you see or do you think that social media

  • subtracts content that you see?

  • Which one's correct?

  • Three, two, one.

  • Do you think that social media censors content that you see?

  • The word sensor means hide something that's unacceptable.

  • Maybe for a music album they might say censored or explicit, and this helps parents to know

  • I don't want my five-year-old to listen to this music because there's something in here

  • that needs to be blocked.

  • But when it comes to social media, maybe the people who run social media are blocking certain

  • things so that we don't see it.

  • This is a controversial opinion.

  • I don't really know what I think about it.

  • I don't really think much about it often.

  • But, I want to know for you, do you think that social media censors the content that

  • we see?

  • Let me know in the comments below, and use the word sensor.

  • Number 11: The mother gave an ... sigh when her son got in trouble at school again.

  • The mother gave an angelic sigh when her son got in trouble at school again or the mother

  • gave an exasperated sigh when her son got in trouble at school again?

  • Is it angelic or exasperated?

  • Three, two, one.

  • The mother gave an exasperated, ugh, sigh when her son got in trouble at school again.

  • Does this word sound familiar?

  • Does it sound like a word we talked about previously?

  • Exacerbate.

  • Oh, it's not the same word.

  • One word has a B, exacerbate.

  • This means to make something worse.

  • If I honk my horn, will it exacerbate the problem?

  • Or in our sample sentence, here we have a mother who's frustrated.

  • That's what the word exasperate, with a P, means, frustrated.

  • "Aw, son, why are you getting in trouble at school, again?"

  • Exasperated.

  • [frustrated sigh].

  • The word exasperate means to breathe out.

  • So, we can kind of imagine the mother going, "[frustrated sigh].

  • Why are you in trouble again?

  • Ah."

  • She's exasperated.

  • She's blowing air out.

  • She's frustrated.

  • Number 12: Even though he tries to be ... he still can't pay his bills.