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  • - [Announcer] Ladies and gentlemen,

  • this is the main event you've all been waiting for,

  • the release of iOS 14.5..

  • In one corner, Apple's CEO, Tim Cook.

  • In the other, the Facebook CEO, Mark Zuckerberg.

  • (bell ringing)

  • (characters banging) (characters punching)

  • (crowd cheering)

  • - Well, folks, that's gonna leave a mark.

  • Pun intended.

  • (crowd booing) (cup clattering)

  • Uh.

  • What we're seeing unfold in this fight

  • is quite complicated.

  • In fact, you're probably thinking

  • what's this beef all about?

  • Apple makes phones, tablets, laptops and more.

  • Facebook makes social networks.

  • Why the slug fest?

  • The simple answer?

  • Differing views of our privacy

  • and it's playing out big time in Apple's new iOS 14.5.

  • But that's just the first round.

  • This is a fight that could shape the future

  • of the internet

  • and certainly, the next wave of computing.

  • Yeah, it's a lot.

  • So I thought it was best to explain it

  • with the help of these guys.

  • No, you cannot buy these

  • because they're just terrifying.

  • (dramatic music)

  • Okay, let's explain this all,

  • starting with what brought this to a head.

  • iOS 14.5.

  • And a new feature called App Tracking Transparency.

  • Now, for years, every iPhone

  • has had a secret string of numbers inside it.

  • It's called the IDFA, Identifier for Advertisers.

  • We'll call it your very own ad tracking number

  • and it's used to help apps identify you

  • and know what you're up to on your phone.

  • So for instance, say Mr. Cook,

  • let's call him user 098002,

  • has decided to relax and download a new meditation app.

  • The app records his number, (app dinging)

  • and here's the thing,

  • the Facebook app and other apps

  • on his phone also have that number.

  • If that same meditation app wants

  • to try to get Mr. Cook

  • on its mega super relaxing subscription plan,

  • it can go to Facebook and say hey,

  • let me advertise to user 098002.

  • If Facebook has that number and there's a match,

  • boom, the personalized ad shows up

  • in Mr. Cook's Facebook feed.

  • There's another way this all used.

  • Say that meditation app shows ads in its feed.

  • It can use Facebook's Ad Network,

  • which again uses that number

  • to keep track of your other interests

  • and feed you highly personalized ads.

  • So you get it.

  • These user numbers are good for Facebook

  • and other social networks

  • that wanna know what we're doing on our phones.

  • And they're good for businesses

  • that want us to buy stuff.

  • But now with iOS 14.5,

  • Apple turns off that ad tracker by default.

  • If an app wants to track you using that number,

  • it will have to ask.

  • If Mr. Cook taps Ask App Not to Track,

  • then his meditation app won't get his number.

  • Apple is giving companies a chance

  • to plead their case with this area right here

  • that explains what the company uses the data for.

  • Don't want those popups at all?

  • You can opt out of all tracking

  • by going to Settings, Privacy, Tracking

  • and turning off Allow Apps to Request to Track.

  • All in all, this is Apple's big play

  • to give people a choice whether they wanna be tracked.

  • And chances are, more people are going

  • to tap Ask App Not to Track.

  • And guess who isn't happy about that all?

  • Eminem, the rapper.

  • (upbeat music)

  • Sorry, I mean Mark Zuckerberg.

  • Our custom designs were rush ordered.

  • See, Facebook's business is built

  • on personalized advertising.

  • Instead of charging you to use Facebook,

  • Facebook charges companies to advertise.

  • These ads are targeted at you based

  • on everything Facebook knows about you.

  • Here's an ad Facebook ran

  • in The Wall Street Journal at the end of 2020.

  • We're standing up to Apple for small businesses everywhere.

  • Many in the business community

  • have shared concerns about Apple's forced software update,

  • which will limit businesses' ability

  • to run personalized ads

  • and reach their customers effectively.

  • (bell dinging) (crowd cheering)

  • (characters punching)

  • Facebook CFO, Dave Wehner,

  • was clear about how it will impact Facebook directly

  • on a January 2021 earnings call.

  • - [Dave] We continue to believe

  • that that will be a headwind in the ads business.

  • We're gonna have to be providing a prompt asking people

  • for permission to use third-party data

  • to deliver personalized ads

  • and we do expect there to be high opt-out rates

  • related to that.

  • - [Joanna] The company added that the Apple prompt

  • doesn't give enough context about the benefits

  • of personalized ads.

  • Still, while Facebook has said recently

  • that it won't have a big impact to its own business,

  • Facebook seems to be acknowledging

  • that given the choice,

  • users would prefer not to be tracked.

  • A Facebook spokesman said,

  • "While Apple claims the update is about privacy,

  • it's about forcing small businesses

  • and developers to charge for apps

  • that were once free,

  • hurting consumers in the process.

  • Free, ad-supported services have been essential

  • to the growth and vitality of the internet,

  • and we're joining others to point out Apple's hypocrisy

  • and anti-competitive behavior."

  • An Apple spokesperson responded.

  • "Apps and advertisers can continue

  • to track users across apps and websites as before.

  • App Tracking Transparency in iOS 14

  • simply requires that they ask for users' permission

  • before sharing their data with other companies.

  • Supporting small businesses has been at the heart

  • of the App Store since it was created

  • to help developers of all sizes develop,

  • test, and distribute apps around the world."

  • The company also says it has introduced new free tools

  • for advertisers to measure their campaigns

  • while respecting user privacy.

  • As a company based on hardware sales

  • and more recently, more subscription services,

  • Apple has long stood on the side of user privacy.

  • Here's Steve Jobs in 2010.

  • - Privacy means people know what they're signing up for

  • in plain English.

  • And some people wanna share more data than other people do.

  • Ask 'em.

  • Ask 'em every time.

  • - [Joanna] And Cook has taken over that mantle

  • and said this in January 2021.

  • - If a business is built on misleading users,

  • on data exploitation,

  • on choices that are no choices at all,

  • then it does not deserve our praise.

  • It deserves reform.

  • At its foundation, ATT is about returning control to users,

  • about giving them a say over how their data is handled.

  • (bell dinging) (crowd cheering)

  • (characters punching)

  • - But of course, there is benefit to Apple's business.

  • Mr. Cook and his team see privacy

  • and other security features,

  • like encryption as a selling point

  • of its hardware and software combo.

  • So two men, two very different business models

  • and two very different visions

  • of how technology and the internet should work for us.

  • And the future fights are going to go way behind privacy.

  • On that same earnings call from January,

  • Mark Zuckerberg said,

  • - [Mark] I do wanna highlight

  • that we increasingly see Apple

  • as one of our biggest competitors.

  • - [Joanna] He pointed out products like iMessage competes

  • with Facebook's messaging business,

  • which includes WhatsApp, Instagram and Facebook Messenger.

  • - [Mark] Apple has every incentive

  • to use their dominant platform position

  • to interfere with how our apps

  • and other apps work, which they regularly do

  • to preference their own.

  • (bell dinging) (crowd cheering)

  • (characters punching)

  • - But where's this really heading?

  • Literally our heads.

  • The fight for the future of computers,

  • augmented reality glasses.

  • When the tech is ready

  • and these aren't just big, bulky headsets,

  • these glasses will probably run an operating system made

  • by one of these companies.

  • And it could be a fight bigger than Android versus iOS

  • or Windows verse Mac.

  • Facebook, which owns Oculus,

  • is investing heavily in the software and hardware side

  • of glasses, and is planning to release some smart glasses

  • in the next year.

  • - I can't go into full product details yet

  • but they're gonna be the next step

  • on the road to augmented reality glasses.

  • - [Joanna] Apple is working on its own headset,

  • according to various reports

  • and Tim Cook has shared his interest

  • in augmented reality for years now.

  • - And I think AR can help amplify the human connection.

  • I've never been a fan of VR like that

  • because I think it does the opposite.

  • - So you see, this change in iOS 14.5

  • is just the start of this fight.

  • You know what's not gonna be happening any time soon?

  • (groovy beach music)

  • As for who ultimately wins,

  • there's not telling

  • but at least with iOS 14.5,

  • the winners are users

  • who have wanted control of their privacy and data.

  • Do you guys do anything else?

  • You just go to the gym all the time?

  • Tim Cook has the same abs as Mark Zuckerberg.

  • They're both ripped.

- [Announcer] Ladies and gentlemen,

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Apple vs. Facebook: Why iOS 14.5 Started a Big Tech Fight | WSJ

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    joey joey に公開 2021 年 05 月 31 日
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