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  • Who are we building for anyway?

  • I measure my life in decades.

  • Four decades ago, I took one too many dives in my buddy's backyard pool and broke my neck paralyzed from chest down.

  • Learning how to use a wheelchair was released from rehab, but moving back to my parent's house wasn't possible.

  • That being a fine home when I was a strong and strapping 16 year old 10 months later wasn't a home built for me.

  • So my parents had to build a new house.

  • Three decades ago, many wife and I bought a little house that was obviously not designed for wheelchair access.

  • We had to do some major renovations just so I could get in the front door.

  • He can imagine the cost in both self esteem and money.

  • Two decades ago, we decided to build their own house.

  • All the current design ideas were with that strong and healthy 18 45 year old male in mind design ideas for the only demographic that actually doesn't need any special consideration.

  • So we decided to design our own house, using a fairly new idea called Universal Design.

  • A decade ago, I broke both my legs in a car accident and as my 90 year old mother in law, so nicely put it now, what does it matter?

  • He's not using him, Daddy Ray, But it did matter.

  • I lost a lot of strength and flexibility.

  • I had to install an overhead lift in my bedroom, changing my way of doing things.

  • Recently, I blew my shoulder out.

  • Not an uncommon issue for people who push a wheelchair.

  • For 40 years I had to transition to a power wheelchair, but I didn't have to make any changes to my house because it had been built with the future in mind.

  • But using a power wheelchair changed the way I interact with others.

  • Yeah, I have more mobility.

  • I'm faster down the streets.

  • I can use transit independently, but nobody else had thought to build a host that I could use and access with a power wheelchair.

  • My friends are getting older, and obviously they're not gonna hold this thing up the stairs, so I don't visit them anymore.

  • Don't go to parties, don't go to family dinners, can't even drop by my buddies for a drink.

  • When we do get together, it's at my house because it was built for everyone.

  • I can't change the fact that I use a wheelchair, but we can't change the way we build.

  • Do we build for everyone everywhere, all the time?

  • You're probably thinking, What's this got to do with me?

  • This guy may have life changing events every 10 years, but really, what are the chances?

  • Well, pretty good.

  • You slip on the ice and turn your ankle.

  • Now you're trying to negotiate stairs using crutches.

  • Your dream home has become an obstacle course.

  • What you'd never given a thought to is now a major challenge.

  • Build a new house.

  • Not likely.

  • Life changing events are not always negative.

  • You're a young mom with a newborn.

  • You dragged that stroller up your front steps.

  • You fight with that round door knob with your hands full and great trip over that threshold or picture Christmas dinner.

  • Grandpa with his arthritic cans, pushing a walker trying tonight it navigate that same situation with each life change of your own or someone close.

  • We have to think of how our new reality may exclude us from full participation in our community.

  • Were forced to change our way of thinking.

  • But what if instead of each individually, often in times of crisis or trauma.

  • What if we, as a society proactively designed things with everyone in mind?

  • Universal design?

  • Let's make tools and utensils that could be used by everyone.

  • Let's shift our thinking about how we build houses and public spaces, parks or restaurants.

  • Carnival rides are water slides.

  • You get the picture designed for everyone, everywhere all the time.

  • Universal design is not a new idea.

  • It's the method to achieve access for everyone everywhere, all the time.

  • The Seven Principles of Universal Design.

  • The concept developed in the late 19 seventies by Ron Mason.

  • Others says that every place, everything can be accessed, understood and used to the greatest extent possible by all people, regardless off age, size, ability or disability.

  • Universal design is critical in the creation and sustaining of inclusive communities four decades ago, we're just trying to remove barriers.

  • Curb ramps, for example, were designed to remove a barrier for people using wheelchairs so they don't end up being splayed out in the middle of traffic when all they're trying to do is get off the sidewalk.

  • It's some driveway, unfortunately, um, unintended side effect of co Gramps was a removing of guidance systems for people who use white canes or assisted animals.

  • Universal design ads, the guidance system, those groove lines in the curb cut.

  • They're important.

  • Universal design makes life easier for everyone.

  • People pushing strollers, people using a wheelchair or a walker, People using a white cane.

  • People like you.

  • The unintended side effect of building accessible spaces is the stigmatizing effect of building for one certain group.

  • When I was building my house, I was cautioned.

  • Don't make it too handicapped looking.

  • I'm thinking, What's that mean anyway?

  • House on wheels are house on crutches.

  • Think of the resale.

  • You're not the only one who's gonna be living in that house.

  • But that's just how we're building houses, even to today.

  • They're not thinking of what your life will be like 3 to 4 decades from now, when you can't get up the stairs, he can't step into the tub.

  • I can't even stand at the counter to make dinner, and those two steps at the front door, maybe impossible.

  • Do you want that ugly, too steep at on ramp?

  • Or would you rather have a beautiful, level landscaped approach right to the front door that you had the foresight to include.

  • When you're building, what's the solution to avoiding that handicapped looking house and having the house you need in the future?

  • Universal design built for everyone.

  • Do we build universal design?

  • A little story?

  • I went to visit a friend recently at his accessible home.

  • He opened the front door with that round door knob, and we managed to struggle over that one inch threshold.

  • Thresholds, by the way, are a leftover design idea from over 100 years ago, where a two by four was shoved under the front door so that the straw flooring thrash.

  • I couldn't get out of the house.

  • My friend gets a call and says, I gotta go.

  • Do you wanna wait for a girl?

  • Wait, but he gets delayed and I need to leave.

  • I fight with that round or managed to get the door open only get hung up on that one inch threshold.

  • Now I'm trapped.

  • I wanted to do was leave.

  • Universal design means there would be no thresholds and the doors would have lever it handles.

  • I would have been able to use that doorway safely and independently.

  • We are making progress.

  • Universal design is the best way to build.

  • We have to think of when we're building for others.

  • What are we doing?

  • Do we think of others when we build?

  • We're just trying to design for each other.

  • So when I finally left my buddy's house, all right, I got out independently.

  • We are making progress.

  • Removing barriers makes life easier for everyone.

  • Pretty soon, everyone wants the universal design.

  • I think of rolling showers, what we're building our house.

  • It was really difficult to find information on products required for a level wide open entry for a shower.

  • Now everyone wants one.

  • It's easier for kids.

  • It's easier for grandma.

  • It's easier for you.

  • And when you really need one, no renovations required.

  • I think of public spaces like the Vancouver International Airport.

  • Recently, someone complained they couldn't find the handicapped washroom.

  • I'm thinking there aren't any.

  • All 148 washrooms are fully accessible.

  • Most have no door entries.

  • Hand dryers and paper towel dispensers are within reach.

  • There's accessible toilet stalls.

  • Everything usable.

  • Bye, everyone, And whether you need it or not, it's accessible.

  • We've made progress in the last four decades.

  • What's the future look like if we all demand universal design.

  • If we demand access for everyone everywhere all the time, you want to go on eat, just go.

  • Universal design means that restaurants are accessible to all.

  • No worry about washem access or sitting at those high top tables.

  • You want a volunteer at the rec center?

  • Just do it.

  • No preplanning required to get there.

  • Transit is universally designed.

  • There's seating and rest areas along the path.

  • If you get tired, the door's open as your approach.

  • Does this have to be far on the future?

  • No.

  • Let's build on the success so far because we're not there yet.

  • We now know that the status quo thinking is just not enough.

  • Let's not wait another four decades.

  • Ask the question.

  • Who are we building for anyway?

  • Support those building with everyone in mind.

  • Look for a universal design, asked for universal design, with everyone involved young and old, whatever the ability, anything is possible.

  • And that means access for everyone everywhere all the time.

  • Thank you.

Who are we building for anyway?

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誰もが、どこでも、いつでも、アクセス|Stan Leyenhorst|TEDxBearCreekPark (Access for Everyone, Everywhere, All the Time | Stan Leyenhorst | TEDxBearCreekPark)

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    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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