Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • all right, school.

  • Hi, everybody.

  • Welcome back to our weekly live stream.

  • My name is Alicia, and today we're going to talk about how to explain details with relative clauses.

  • Today, we're going to talk a lot about grammar, so there's a lot to cover s, so we're going to start in about a minute or two.

  • So as you joined, please make sure to send a message in the chat.

  • And don't forget to like and share the video so other learners can find today's lesson, as always, to announcements while we wait for everyone to join first.

  • As always, there is free stuff for you in the link below the video on YouTube.

  • If you're watching on YouTube or above the video.

  • If you're watching on Facebook, these are all free.

  • These air pdf format vocabulary sheets so you can take a look at these from the link and choose whichever one is interesting for.

  • You are useful for your studies.

  • Now that is announcement one.

  • And as we do uh, OK, yeah, we can use that one.

  • This is a photo from our monthly review sessions, the monthly review sessions I talk about sometimes on this live stream.

  • But every month you have the opportunity to send us your audio or video messages, completing some kind of challenge using English.

  • So we actually I actually listen to these here in the studio and respond to them, and then we share them on our YouTube channel.

  • So if you want to participate in next month's, you can find the details for this on the English Class 101 YouTube channel.

  • Ah, look for the monthly review videos.

  • There's a link in the description, so please check that out.

  • I think this week's or this month's is something about explaining your summer activities.

  • I believe so.

  • Please check that out.

  • It's always really cool to hear from everybody.

  • Okay, I see many people in the chat now.

  • Hi, everybody on YouTube.

  • I see Rachael Rendall markets in high.

  • Moy says.

  • True.

  • Hello.

  • Ah, and on Facebook, I see Carlos or in Hello, I need an amnio and Erik all kinds of people.

  • Great.

  • Sounds good.

  • It was timed out by night, but that's hilarious.

  • Excellent.

  • So I'm going to share the video, and then I'm going to get started with today's lesson.

  • We have a lot to cover today, so I hope I can get through everything we'll see.

  • It'll be a challenge.

  • Maybe.

  • Ah, but I hope also one more point before I start.

  • I hope also you share your ideas throughout today's live stream.

  • So in red, it's small.

  • I have some prompts for you.

  • So as I'm explaining things, you can use this to make your own sentence and send it in the chat.

  • And I will try to check it live if I can't catch shares.

  • I'm sorry.

  • I will try to check everything live, but I may miss yours.

  • Okay, so let's get it started first.

  • Let's begin over here.

  • What is a relative clause?

  • What is a relative clause?

  • This is today's focus grammar point.

  • A relative clause is like a long adjective.

  • So adjectives are words that give us more information about knowns.

  • So, for example, interesting or boring or beautiful or delicious, these are all adjectives.

  • A relative clause is like a group of words together that has the same function, or it acts the same way as an adjective.

  • So this is what we're going to focus on today to give lots of details in our sentences.

  • So the second point relative clauses give us extra information about now, so let's take a look at two examples.

  • Both of these sentences use relative clauses.

  • 1st 1 My phone, which is an iPhone success, has terrible battery life these days.

  • So one more time my iPhone or sorry, My phone, which is an iPhone success, has terrible battery life.

  • These days, this sentence uses a relative clause.

  • Second example.

  • I like the movies that Christopher Nolan makes.

  • I like the movies that Christopher Nolan makes.

  • So these sentences both use relative clauses.

  • They are here in this sentence and here in this sentence.

  • So there are two kinds of relative clauses were going to talk about both of them today.

  • So first point about making this about giving extra details With today's grammar point, relative clauses begin with something called a relative pronoun, a relative pronoun.

  • For today we're going to focus on three relative pronouns.

  • They are that which and who So when you make a relative clause the basic form of a relative clause, the first word will be a relative pronoun in this case, my phone, which is an iPhone success, which is a relative pronoun, it begins my extra information here.

  • Same thing in this sentence.

  • I like the movies that Christopher Nolan makes here.

  • My relative clause is this part and it begins with that.

  • So this is a relative pronoun these a relative brownout.

  • So how do we know which one to use?

  • Do I use that?

  • Do I use which do I use you for?

  • Today we're going to look at these three relative pronouns.

  • You can use that And who, when you're talking about people, people here.

  • So in this case, I'm talking about a phone in my first example sentence in my second example sentence.

  • I'm talking about movies.

  • So these air both objects.

  • We're going to practice people later.

  • Second, you can use that or which four objects.

  • So objects that means things, not people you might also here.

  • Sometimes people use who to talk about their pets as well.

  • I'm not going to talk about pets in my example sentences today, but for your information.

  • So, uh, another common question, though, is what's the difference between that and which, like, in this case, that in which for objects, But how do I decide?

  • Should I use that for which this point is a little more advanced, so I will cover it briefly for today.

  • The difference is in what's called restrictive relative clauses and non restrictive relative clauses.

  • So these, like, really like complex air may be difficult to understand words, but they mean a restrictive clause is something that gives us essential information essential information about the now.

  • So this means if I don't have this relative clause, I don't understand the noun.

  • So, for example, in this example sentence, I like the movies that Christopher Nolan makes.

  • If I remove the relative clause here, my sentence becomes I like the movies and run.

  • We don't know, like, what does that mean?

  • I like the movies, will, Which movies we don't know.

  • So that means we have tohave.

  • We must have this information to understand this.

  • Now, if we do not have this information, we cannot understand this now.

  • This sentence is an example of a restrictive relative cloth, so that means we must have the information in these types of sentence.

  • We use that as the relative pronoun.

  • On the other hand, the other type where we use which it's used in what's called a non restrictive relative clause so non restrictive.

  • So meaning not it's the negative form.

  • A non restrictive relative clause is a clause giving just extra information.

  • We don't have toe have the information to understand the noun.

  • It's like a bonus, kind of.

  • So this example sentence uses a non restrictive relative clause.

  • My phone, which is an iPhone success, has terrible battery life these days.

  • So again, my test if I removed hard truth mirror if I remove the relative clause, the sentence becomes My phone has terrible battery life these days, so I can understand.

  • The sentence is easy for me to understand.

  • I know exactly the topic, my phone.

  • So when we use a non restrictive relative clause, we can use which to begin also, when you use a non restrictive relative clause, use commas.

  • It's hard to see in the live stream.

  • Use commas.

  • Set it off with commas here, so there's a comma at the beginning and a kama at the end of the claws.

  • So this is a punctuation point as well.

  • So my comment I will get to your comments now was to share about the work of your favorite creator.

  • So I said, I liked the movies the Christopher Nolan makes.

  • I think I saw a few of you sending some comments.

  • Uh, odd.

  • Gertrude is maybe I love the Batman movies that Christopher Nolan makes her.

  • I love the bat.

  • The Batman stories that Christopher Nolan tells.

  • Great.

  • Uh, some other examples.

  • Lots of people are just saying Hello.

  • Hello, everybody.

  • So yeah, uh, share.

  • It's hard to see Share about the work of your favorite creator.

  • So you can use this as a pattern if you like.

  • I like movies or TV shows or the music that someone makes.

  • Sweetheart says I like the games that she that Hideo Kojima makes Perfect.

  • Very nice example.

  • Very nice example.

  • I like the games that he D O Quilty.

  • Momix.

  • Uh, que Lau says I like the dinosaurs which are stored in the museum.

  • Good.

  • I like the dinosaurs.

  • Make sure to use the plural form for your accountable knowns, and then your verb needs to match.

  • Yeah.

  • Leah says I like the lessons that Alicia makes.

  • Thanks, Leah.

  • Okay.

  • Other examples.

  • Mmm mmm, mmm.

  • Mmm.

  • Maybe a Miguel says I like my games, which is an Xbox.

  • 360 husband starts.

  • So maybe I like my gaming.

  • Let's see my gaming system.

  • So make your subject the topic of your discussion.

  • My gaming system, which is an Xbox.

  • 360.

  • Has good storage.

  • Something like that would be perfect on Facebook.

  • Jason says I like the books that Edgar Rice Burroughs.

  • Right.

  • So I don't know that author.

  • Very nice, though.

  • I like the books that he writes.

  • Okay.

  • Other ones.

  • I like my friend, who always helps me with my problems.

  • Great.

  • Great.

  • So that sounds like