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  • Hey guys!

  • How's it going?

  • My name is Micaela and today I'm here with another talky-video blog on a subject that's

  • kind of hard to talk about.

  • By now I'm sure you're already familiar with the phrase "Gaijin", or "Gaikokujin".

  • This literally translates to "Outside Person," but it's a term we use to describe foreigners

  • in Japan!

  • Foreigners can for the most part be broken down into two different types: the "Kankoukyaku",

  • the tourist, or the "Zaijuugaikokujin", the resident foreigners, the people who generally,

  • either they are working, or they're in school, or, for whatever reason, they're here for

  • an extended period of time.

  • And for me, as a foreigner who has lived in Japan for almost 11 years, it's very very

  • easy to tell the difference between someone who is just visiting, and someone who has

  • lived here.

  • So I often get messages from people who are planning on visiting Japan long-term, they

  • want to be residents, they want to live here, and they're worried about certain habits or

  • things that they might do that will make them stand out as foreigners..

  • First, right off the bat, I have to say, obviously, um, if you look like me, if you've got the

  • pale white skin, and the fair hair, and you don't have any asian features, um, it's going

  • to be really hard to blend in physically, and that's just something that will never

  • change.

  • But I do have a list of a few "cringeworthy" things that foreigners who come to Japan,

  • who haven't really understood Japan, do, so hopefully this list will kind of help you

  • figure out what behaviors you need to kind of watch out for when you do visit Japan.

  • Now this is just a list based on my personal experience, and if you are just travelling

  • through Japan, if you are here on a vacation, having a nice time, I don't think you need

  • to worry too much about whether or not you stand out as a foreigner, because, if you

  • are a tourist, you're a tourist, there's nothing you can do about that.

  • All I have to say to YOU, is just be polite, be respectful, pay attention to your surroundings,

  • don't... be... a jerk.

  • And I'm sure you'll have a good time.

  • Cringeworthy behavior number one!

  • Talking too loudly on public transit, um, busses, trains, subways, are generally really

  • quiet places, people like to sit, and while it's normal to have a conversation maybe with

  • the person beside you, in a low voice, you definitely do not talk on the phone.

  • Talking on the phone is considered very offensive, and if you're with friends, you definitely

  • have to pay attention to the level of your voice.

  • When I was first came to Japan people would tell me that when I was getting really excited,

  • my volume, I would raise the volume of my voice.

  • If I was telling a story and I was getting excited, I would talk louder, and I remember

  • so many times I'd be on the bus or train and my friends would just be like, "SHHH.

  • Shut up.

  • Shut up."

  • "Keep going, but shut up, you're just, so loud!"

  • Sometimes you might witness bad behavior by a Japanese citizen, that does not mean that

  • it's okay.

  • If a guy is sitting on the train, talking on his phone, chances are everyone around

  • him thinks he's an asshole.

  • At the end of the day, you are a guest in another country, and it is not about YOU,

  • it's not about YOU all the time, but controlling these habits, no matter how essential they

  • seem to be to you in that moment, is actually just a huge sign of respect to the people

  • around you, and that's kind of one of the foundations of Japanese culture, is like,

  • respect, for one another, so, unfortunately that's a thing here.

  • So, please...

  • Obey.

  • Cringeworthy Behavior By Foreigners # 2!

  • Being inappropriately dressed for any sort of occasion, is a tell-tale sign that you

  • just haven't been here long enough.

  • Fashion is just oh it's such a headache in Japan, and I'm sorry about that, but um.

  • Nah, in Japan people do put a lot of time and effort into their appearance, and one

  • of the most embarrassing, and like, humbling experiences, is showing up to an event or

  • showing up to a party, meeting people for dinner, and realizing you're just like, incredibly

  • underdressed.

  • Like, you just threw on t-shirts and jeans, and they've got like, jackets, they've done

  • their hair, the girls have perfect makeup, and perfect hair, and you just feel like a

  • mop.

  • Not only that but everyone you will notice, they'll look at you and you'll stick out like

  • a sore thumb, as if you don't stick out enough, by looking like ya do.

  • When I first started teaching English living in Japan, as a worker, not a student, my boss

  • gave me the advice that whenever you go to an event, or a party, or you're meeting people

  • for dinner, you should always make a secret contest to be the best dressed person in the

  • room.

  • And if you do that, you know, you're kind of keeping up them, cause I bet that some

  • of them have the same goals as well.

  • As long as you put some effort into your appearance and you show up feeling like you're looking

  • great, you won't stand out as much.

  • If you show up with the confidence in what you're wearing, and you're like, "yeah I'm

  • totally killing it!"

  • Then other people will kind of like, accept it.

  • I feel like the more insecure you feel, the more insecure you look, so that's a thing

  • too.

  • But yeah, definitely Japanese people are a little more fashion conscious.

  • If you don't want to stick out like a sore thumb, you kind of have to try to keep yourself

  • groomed, keep yourself clean, and keep up with what the people around you are doing

  • and wearing and stuff like that.

  • Alright, so, Cringeworthy Habit #3,

  • This is something that I've witnessed so many times, that gives me second hand embarrassment,

  • um.

  • When you live overseas it can be kind of hard to get your hands on relevant Japanese music

  • or Japanese dramas, or Japanese movies, or anime, or any sort of pop culture material,

  • and something that you need to keep in mind about Japan, is that the turnover rate, for

  • entertainers in the industry is insanely fast.

  • So you may have found something funny on the internet, like some comedian, or a cetain

  • movie, or you know, some sort of song, but just because it was relevant two or three

  • years ago, doesn't mean it's going to be relevant today.

  • And, Japanese comedians will get popular and then they will just disappear, they just disappear!

  • I don't even know where they go!

  • Maybe you saw a video of Hard Gay on the internet, and you thought he was hilarious, but I guarantee

  • you that a lot of young people now, if you talk to them about it, they're not going to

  • know who he is.

  • So just be careful about that, something that you saw in some obscure form of Japanese media

  • isn't necessarily relevant in Japan, and oddly enough, things that are not relevant in Japan

  • at all become like, really, famous overseas, for some reason, but I dunno, that's like,

  • a whole different story.

  • Alright, and Cringeworthy Behavior #4

  • This is something that actually is a huge problem and I need to talk to you about it.

  • Anyone who has been in Japan for a long time will know that Japanese are very very protective

  • about their own privacy, this means that they'll avoid television cameras because they don't

  • want to be on TV, they don't want their face on TV, they'll wear masks in public so that

  • people can't see their face, it's even part of why YouTube didn't catch on for so long

  • in Japan, because people were not down with the idea of broadcasting their face and their

  • opinions over the internet.

  • So, when you whip out your cell phone, or your camera, and you take a picture of that

  • guy who fell asleep on the train, if you're taking a photo of someone eating a bento in

  • the park, or, even worse, if you're taking photos of young girls in their school uniforms,

  • it's just an invasion of privacy!

  • It's an invasion of privacy, and it's rude, and, even if they don't say anything, because

  • they're afraid to confront you, they don't feel comfortable about it.

  • If you absolutely must take a photo of someone or something and you're not sure if it's okay,

  • and you don't speak Japanese well enough to ask, you can always do the "cameraman nod".

  • The "Cameraman Nod", is really simple, because you don't have to need to speak the same language

  • to understand what you're asking.

  • Usually maybe you'll show the camera, maybe point to it, and like, ask, ask with your

  • eyes, like this!

  • If they look at you and they nod back, chances are they are aware that the big giant camera

  • in your hand is going to be used to take a photo of them, and they're cool with it.

  • So, if you can get that kind of communication down then that's fine, but what I really don't

  • like to see is people taking pictures of young girls in school outfits, because it's cute,

  • or because it looks just like the anime, because, at the end of the day those girls are just

  • trying to go to school and go about their daily lives, and they're not there to entertain

  • foreigners.

  • So, please, just out of respect to the people, don't take pictures of young, underaged girls,

  • or, even other citizens in Japan without at least getting permission.

  • So those are four of the worst habits that I've seen from foreigners that haven't quite

  • "assimilated" with the Japanese culture yet, so maybe you can keep those in mind when you

  • come to visit.

  • If it does seem kind of like a hassle and it's stressing you out, and you're really

  • worried about not fitting in, ultimately don't worry about it.

  • Don't worry about it, and just try not to be a jerk, just be the best version of yourself

  • that you possibly can be.

  • Be respectful, be polite, be courteous, be kind, and don't forget to smile!

  • And if you can just keep on top of those things, I'm sure your trip will go absolutely fine

  • without a hitch!

  • Thank you so much for watching, don't forget to check out my second channel, if you're

  • interested in more like, daily life style videos, cause I've started updating there

  • now, and that's a thing, and I promise I'm going to try and keep it up, even though I'm

  • really bad at promising, and I'm really bad at keeping things up.

  • Check it out if you're interested, alright, so I'll make another video soon!

  • Talk to you later, bye friends!

Hey guys!

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Mistakes Newcomers Make | 外国人へのアドバイス (Mistakes Newcomers Make | 外国人へのアドバイス)

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    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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