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  • Memory and Study StrategiesPresentation

  • A Quick Note about Study Strategies Classes

  • Just like the first year of college and just like first year students and college students

  • as a whole, academic support services and study strategy courses have received a lot

  • of attention. And, just like the other topics weve covered, the results of research about

  • the effectiveness of such programs and services is mixed.

  • Here is what I want us to focus on from this body of research, that students tend to dislike

  • these types of services or not use these services at all for the following four reasons: first,

  • that students believe they cannot change, that they are incapable of learning new strategies

  • and techniques or adapting old ones; second, that students don’t want to change, their

  • old techniques worked just fine in high school and, if applied, will work just fine in college;

  • third, that students don’t know what to change, that they are unsure of what techniques

  • can be carried over from high school to college, what techniques should be developed further

  • in order to be more successful, and what techniques should be dropped completely; and, forth,

  • that students don’t know how to change (Dembo and Seli, 2004).

  • The next part of this presentation will provide students with an overview of the Standard

  • Memory Model; how any type of sensory input is taken in and transformed into a representation

  • that can be placed into memory, how that representation is stored or encoded in such a way that it

  • is retained in the memory, and how you can retrieve or gain access to that stored information

  • (Sternberg and Williams, 2010). Students will participate in a short exercise designed to

  • assist them in thinking about how they take in information, store and retrieve it. This

  • presentation will conclude with a brief overview of different resources about study strategies,

  • which students will use to complete the Week Four Discussion Forum and Week Four Journal

  • Assignment.

  • Memory

  • What is memory? For the purpose of this presentation, we are going to use the following definition,

  • thatmemory is the active mental mechanisms that enable people to retain and retrieve

  • information about past experiences” (Baddeley, 1999; Crowder, 1976 as cited in Sternberg

  • and Williams, 2010, p. 270). This is just one definition, and the Standard Memory Model

  • is just one model of how memory works. If interested, students are encouraged to consult

  • with the Reference Librarian for additional sources of information about memory. For our

  • purposes this week, we are going to focus on sensory input, retention of this sensory

  • input or how the memory of the experience is retained, and finally, how the retained

  • input is retrieved and used in some way by the student.

  • Let’s start by looking at the environment that you are interacting with. As students,

  • well focus on the stereotypical classroom. In this classroom, the instructor is providing

  • information in several ways: first, as notes on the board, second, as spoken word, and

  • third as an interactive activity that students in the class complete as members of small

  • groups. In this example, you are taking in information from your environment in a number

  • of ways including visually, aurally, and kinesthetically. As this information is coming in through your

  • senses, it is put into short-term memory. How long this information stays in short-term

  • memory depends on what you do with it. If you do nothing with the information you are

  • taking in through your senses, you may loose it within a matter of seconds; if you consciously

  • choose to do something (which well define in a minute) with the information, you could

  • retain it for a few minutes or, depending on how invested you are, you could possible

  • retain the information for life (Sternberg and Williams, 2010).

  • As I stated earlier, unless you consciously choose to do something with this input, youre

  • going to forget it within a few moments. Thisthingyou could decide to do is called

  • rehearsal…[or] the repeated recitation of an item” (Sternberg and Williams, 2010,

  • p 273). You probably do this everyday and have since as far back as you can remember.

  • What do I need from the grocery store; what was that persons phone number; how do I take

  • my coffee; how do I operate my car; what classes do I have today and what building is the classroom

  • in? The amount of recitation or practice and the level of sophistication of this practice

  • will have an impact on your ability to retain the information over a long period of time

  • and be able to retrieve the information and put it to use.

  • Let’s do a short exercise to try and illustrate this point. I’m going to read a series of

  • words and these words will appear on the screen. As I am reading this list of words, DO NOT

  • write them down. I am then going to give you one minute after I have finished reading this

  • list of words to write down as many as you can remember. With me? Alright, here we go.

  • ANGEL, pencil, classroom, computer, textbooks, professor, FAFSA, Washington Hall, registration,

  • SUNY, discussion, syllabus, research, students, Timberwolves, transfer, advisement, graduation,

  • major, library.

  • Okay, you have one minute on the clock. Try to recall as many words as you can in the

  • next sixty seconds.

  • Alright, times up. Here is the list of words again on the screen and I’ll read through

  • them now: ANGEL, pencil, classroom, computer, textbooks, professor, FAFSA, Washington Hall,

  • registration, SUNY, discussion, syllabus, research, students, Timberwolves, transfer,

  • advisement, graduation, major, library.

  • Did you get all twenty? Between fifteen and twenty? Between ten and fourteen? Less than

  • ten? The number you remembered in this activity isn’t important. What’s important is what

  • you did to try and remember them. For example, did you pick up on what all of these words

  • had in common? That’s right, they are all things associated with SUNY Adirondack. As

  • I was reading them aloud, did you try repeating the words to yourself? Did you try to make-up

  • a story about the different words and how they may fit together?

  • Whatever you did, that’s a type of rehearsal and this is a good place to transition to

  • the last part of this presentation, study strategies.

  • Study Strategies

  • Here is what this part of the presentation isn’t going to cover: specific things you

  • can do to improve your time management, note taking, or other academic self-regulatory

  • processes. Developing a list and making suggestions of specific techniques are things that you

  • are going to do to help each other as part of the Week Four Discussion Forum.

  • What this part of the presentation is going to cover are sources of information that you

  • can use to find out about different techniques for improving your time management, note taking,

  • and in-and-out of class behavior to assist you in improving academically. Also, in this

  • part of the presentation, I’m going to make one last attempt at connect the importance

  • of understanding how memory works and about knowing yourself and ways that you can improve

  • your chances for success in college, and even in the work place.

  • Sources of Information

  • The Internet is a great place, however, it has both good and bad neighborhoods. Here

  • are some sources I’d recommend and I’ll include the necessary links within the Week

  • Four folder in ANGEL:

  • Study Guides and Strategies, a web site that contains links, articles, and even interactive

  • web-based exercises on everything from time management and working in groups to different

  • memorization techniques and tips for organizing projects. I’ve used this site for years

  • and highly recommend it.

  • Learning Disabilities Pride is another web site that I’ve used for a while now and

  • while it is geared towards individuals with learning disabilities, there are resources

  • available through this site that are general enough for all learners, regardless of ability

  • or disability.

  • Finally, if you are into assessments, I’d recommend the VARK – A Guide to Learning

  • Styles web site. This site contains a learning styles assessment and different resources

  • for learning study techniques that match your strengths as an individual learner.

  • Real quick. As you are working your way through these sites, you may be tempted to purchase

  • a book or manual or assessment results. DON’T. Take advantage of the resources available

  • on-campus such as books in the library, hand-outs available from the counselors or the Center

  • for Reading and Writing, or do another web search on the topic you are looking for. Youll

  • probably be able to find additional sources of free information, especially from different

  • college or university web sites. For example, the University of Minnesota at Duluth, as

  • part of their online Student Handbook, has a great Study Strategies Homepage with links

  • to all sorts of information.

  • Quick Overview of Assignments

  • Week Four Discussion Forum

  • For the Week Four Discussion Forum, students are required to create an original post about

  • their study strategies and techniques. How do you manage your time? Read a textbook?

  • Study for exams? Share what’s worked for you with the class. As weve been doing,

  • after youve created your original post, comment on at least two classmates posts.

  • By the end of Week Four, our discussion forum will serve as an additional resource of suggestions

  • for different study strategies. I’ll convert the Discussion Forum into a PDF file that

  • you can download to reference in the future.

  • Additional instructions can be found in theWeek Four Discussion Forum

  • Week Four Journal Assignment

  • For the Week Four Journal Assignment, I want you to respond to the following statement:

  • I am a great student who earns the grades I want to earn and do not need any help with

  • my courses.

  • As with previous journal assignments, your submission should be a page long.

  • Additional instructions can be found within theWeek Four Journal Assignment’.

  • Due Dates

  • All assignments must be posted by midnight on Tuesday, October 5, 2010 to receive full

  • credit. All late submissions will receive 75% of the original points possible for the

  • assignment.

  • Remember, any late assignments must be submitted by Tuesday, November 16, 2010 in order to

  • receive any points. No late assignments will be accepted after midnight on Tuesday, November

  • 16, 2010.

  • Contact Information

  • If you have any questions you can email me at martinj@sunyacc.edu

  • You can also post in theRaise Your HandDiscussion Forum. This forum is located in

  • ANGEL and I encourage students to use this and to interact with one another. Get in the

  • habit of checking this discussion each time you access the course in ANGEL. You may be

  • able to answer your classmates question or provide insight or suggestions.

  • References

  • Dembo, M.H., & Seli, H.P. (2004). Studentsresistance to change in learning strategies

  • courses. Journal of Developmental Education, 27(3), 2-11.

  • Sternberg, R.J., & Williams, W.M. (2010). Educational psychology (2nd ed.). Upper Saddle

  • River, NJ: Pearson Education, Inc.

Memory and Study StrategiesPresentation

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記憶力と学習戦略発表会 (Memory and Study Strategies Presentation)

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    阿多賓 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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