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  • Narrator: The home of the Californiacs was the first state park state.

  • Back in 1865 the federal government gave her the Yosemite Valley

  • which was a state park until it went back to Uncle Sam again in 1890,

  • to become part of Yosemite National Park.

  • At the turn of the century she made a second effort,

  • buying 9,000 acres of redwood forest and creating California Redwood State Park.

  • Redwoods, the tall tapering giants of the tree world,

  • are largely responsible for the fact that the Golden State has a state park system,

  • one of the finest in existence.

  • During the World War, an extraordinary organization, the Save the Redwoods League, was brought into existence,

  • chiefly to save as much as possible of the virgin redwood forest along the northern coast of the state.

  • Out of the work of this league, drew the movement for a series of parks

  • to contain liberal samples of the best of California’s natural beauty.

  • Three to one, Californians voted in 1929 in favor of a bond issue of $6 million for parks.

  • The Bond Act required that [...] of that, $6 million has been spent.

  • And for it, California has obtained mountain and sea, forest and desert,

  • canyon, stream, and waterfall worth twice [...]

  • Majestic world, carpeted with smooth Oxalis or Giant Fern,

  • from which straight clean trunks rise 300 feet toward the sky,

  • are found in California's state parks,

  • saved forever from the axe to fill those who behold them with awe and reverence.

  • California Redwood State Park, consisting of some 10,000 acres, mostly redwood forest,

  • two and one-half hours distant from San Francisco in Santa Cruz County,

  • was the first California State Park to be established

  • when the Golden State set out determinedly to create a system of state-owned recreational areas second to none.

  • It is a magnificent monument to those stately giants of the forest world.

  • The park is splendidly equipped to serve the requirements of the visiting public

  • and in the summer season is constantly thronged with pleasure seekers.

  • The coming of the Civilian Conservation Corps under the ECW plan

  • speeded up a program of continued development which will take many years to complete.

  • Additional roads and trails are badly needed

  • for it must be remembered that the park covers almost 16 square miles.

  • The trail building isn’t easy,

  • for there are timbered canyons to be encircled and traversed and real mountains to be climbed.

  • Bridges are being put in, constructed entirely of bold native material.

  • Timbers are easy to procure and therefore inexpensive.

  • The Conservation Corps, under the expert direction they are given, are able to handle every detail of the work.

  • A park as large as this one, as well known and as intensively used,

  • must go in for the minute details of park equipment in a rather big way.

  • There are lots of outdoor cooking or camp stoves and the yards in which they are built,

  • with much of the labor done by Conservation Corps enrollees,

  • are real concrete fabricating plants.

  • The camp equipment is designed by draftsmen and engineers attached to the camps.

  • The chief aim in design is that of fitness in relation to forest environment.

  • Along and near the south fork of the Eel river and it tributaries,

  • and in the region traversed by the Redwood Highway,

  • are outstanding beauty spots of stream and valley landscape.

  • Though long established as a popular resort for visitors to Humboldt County,

  • Humboldt Redwood State Park has always needed just the kind of work

  • which was made possible through inauguration of the ECW plan

  • with its army of Civilian Conservation Corps workers.

  • It was imperative that the beauty of the area as a whole be preserved

  • by extending the boundaries of the original lands comprising the park.

  • Clearing dense undergrowth from the big redwoods for fire prevention and freer growth

  • provides lumber for practically any kind of construction job which may be desirable.

  • The Conservation Corps boys make everything from heavy bridge timbers to park signs.

  • Many of the trails being built have exceptional scenic beauty.

  • They wind for miles over fern-clad slopes to reach the mountaintops.

  • Around the Corps campsites, the traffic set up by the new work project,

  • using tractors, trucks, and other heavy machinery,

  • make constant road work necessary.

  • Increasing the telephone communication system in these big forest areas

  • is an invaluable conservation measure which the enrollees are contributing.

  • Timber fires haven’t nearly the chance they had some years ago.

  • Here are some of the most impressive and earliest known groups of big sequoias.

  • The Stanislaus River, one of the most beautiful of the many California mountain streams,

  • flows near the groves.

  • In forests where necessary thinning provides the poles,

  • the extension of telephone and telegraph systems is not difficult.

  • Miles of fire lanes are being cut.

  • Trenching and the improvement of [...].

  • Narrator 2: The San Jacinto Mountains in Riverside County

  • constitute an outlying and isolated southern representation of conditions characteristic of the Sierras.

  • Here are more than 50 square miles of beautiful wilderness, virgin timber, and rugged mountains

  • one towering peak that rises well over two miles.

  • The summit of the range affords an impressive view of the surrounding country for hundreds of miles around.

  • And from Hidden Lake, one can see the desert so weirdly and mysteriously barren,

  • on the very edge of this amazingly fertile California.

  • In recent years, the world over, there seems to have been an awakening to the joys of a more rugged life outdoors.

  • Thousands of men, women, and children are tramping the countryside

  • not merely riding through it in comfortable conveyances.

  • Pack train trips in our larger national parks are more popular than ever before.

  • San Jacinto is one area where the beauties of nature will never unfold themselves completely

  • to those who think of scenic sightseeing as a job for automobiles.

  • Here there must always be miles of foot trails at the ends of motor roads.

  • One Conservation Corps camp was established way up in the clouds.

  • Lumber had to be carried up on the backs of horses and burros.

  • From the winding trail, the traveler is able to enjoy a constantly changing panorama

  • of natural beauty spots, fern covered ledges, waterfalls, unusual rock formations,

  • and the countless other wonders which nature alone can create.

  • There’s a lot of work to establishing the kind of camp

  • in which more than 200 people can live for an indefinite period, winter and summer,

  • in comfort and with safety to their health.

  • In this mountain country, the same rocks that make grating difficult

  • have their virtue in providing splendid material for foundations, wherever building strength is essential.

  • Building additional trails is a part of the enrolleeswork at San Jacinto.

  • Some of these trails look like little shelves in the solid rock walls of awe-inspiring chasms.

  • Culverts and supports are made from granite blocks quarried right on the job.

  • The first chow call of the day in most Conservation Corps camps is at the early hour of six in the morning.

  • But no one is ever late for breakfasthis appetite won’t let him.

  • Looks like ham and eggs.

  • Luncheon is sometimes served in the field for the boys frequently work many miles from camp.

  • And the camp administrators insist that the workers have hot food three times a day.

  • Dinner, or supper if you prefer the term, is served about 4:30 in the afternoon,

  • every man his own dishwasher.

  • Rubicon Point is a scenic area on the shores of Lake Tahoe,

  • one of the highest and the largest of the Sierra Lakes.

  • The lake itself, because bodies of water this size are rarely found at such high altitudes,

  • is an outstanding attraction in the Pacific coast section.

  • Here’s an expanse of 193 square miles of cold crystal clear water,

  • perched almost a mile and a quarter high in the mountains.

  • Many of the motion picture celebrities from southern California have cottages along its shores.

  • Within easy motoring distance of Sacramento, Oakland, and San Francisco,

  • the Rubicon Point Park development attracts many visitors.

  • Campsites, particularly around Rubicon Point proper, with its sandy beach, are popular.

  • The Conservation Corps boys are doing much of their work in the forests,

  • cutting new trails and establishing additional campsites.

  • Sometimes they find it necessary […] their period of usefulness,

  • and are interfering with the development of the park as a whole.

  • One of those not infrequent examples of eroded rock is a point of interest.

  • It is called the Balanced Rock.

  • Not enough is known of the Civilian Conservation, or conservation of civilians, part of this unique nationwide recovery plan.

  • More than one million young men and war veterans have been participants.

  • Few of them have failed to absorb benefits of even greater value to them

  • than the mere employment and money they have been given.

  • These boys here are being taught many things about tree and plant life,

  • insect pest control, and so on which they can apply in later life.

  • Prairie Creek in Humboldt County is a magnificent redwood park.

  • Rocky ocean shores, with here-and-there stretches of sandy beach,

  • add materially to the charm of the region.

  • Think of the peace of a camp like this, where trees lift themselves 300 feet

  • from the springy turf redolent with the incense of redwood, pine, and fur.

  • At Patrick’s Point, forests give way to meadows and meadows, in turn, to the sea.

  • One stretch of beach is being cleaned of debris to provide fine ocean bathing.

  • Undergrowth is luxuriantly deep, and the trail-building is being carefully done to preserve it.

  • One of the interesting activities of the boys here is the making of redwood signs to mark trails and places of interest.

  • Unusual talents along widely varied lines have been uncovered among the enrollees.

  • From roads along the tumultuous Big Sur River there are vistas of churning rapids,

  • lively waterfalls, stately forests, wood-fringed meadows, and lofty mountain peaks.

  • Just before it plunges into the Pacific,

  • the Big Sur traverses a beautiful valley about 250 feet above sea level.

  • Six hundred acres, including this valley, are comprised in this outstanding state park area,

  • variously named from the Big Sur River, Pfeiffer’s Woods, and Pfeiffer’s Point,

  • which are in the same vicinity.

  • Mountain streams in the California region are unusually swift and powerful.

  • When they start for their ocean destination

  • from elevations much greater than those which are common along the Atlantic seaboard,

  • they move with speed and determination.

  • The distances they traverse are relatively short.

  • Their drop is much more precipitate.

  • They're really a part of one great waterfall,

  • from the peaks of the Sierras to the expansive and powerful Pacific.

  • The park is in Monterey County about 30 miles south of Carmel,

  • with its western boundary about six miles from the junction of the Big Sur and the Pacific Ocean.

  • It is on a fine state highway and easily accessible to travelers en route between Los Angeles and San Francisco,

  • the two largest cities in the state.

  • Its scenic features are unusually diversified.

  • Manuel Peak and Post Summit are each about 3,500 feet high.

  • Sycamore and Big Sur are mountain canyons well worthy of the name.

  • The Juan Higuera Creek Falls are of exceptional beauty,

  • and there are inspiring groves of redwoods.

  • Generally speaking, building construction work done by the Conservation Corps enrollees is confined

  • to structures incident to the program being carried out.

  • Barracks and administration buildings are usually built for them before they arrive in camp.

  • This garage for their tractors, trucks, and so on is, however, of Conservation Corps construction.

  • Much of the trail and road work being done requires nothing more than the good old pick and shovel,

  • but in some instances the most modern of motorized equipment is being used.

  • There are seasons of the year when the Big Sur becomes quite unruly

  • and an important part of work is on the riverbed easing the flow of water at floodtide.

  • With 200 active young Americans on hand good baseball is an almost inevitable result [...]

  • Miles of babbling brooks, just the sort of place people from the coast cities like so well.

  • Roads and trails to open up new spots frequently require retaining walls, culverts and short bridges.

  • A fortunate circumstance at Cuyamaca is that sand and gravel are easily available,

  • material to keep steam shovels and trucks busy for days.

  • Useful and attractive and […] medical Incense-cedar.

  • Careful choice of the trees which are already dead or are being crowded to death

  • is helping, not hurting, the forests.

  • Cedar is comparatively easy, splitting into good clean rails which have splendid lasting qualities.

  • The fence you see being erected is near the Corps camp.

  • Grasshopper [...] unnoticeable in the beautiful meadows which abound in the park.

  • They are effectively stopped with a diet of poisoned bran.

  • Here are the boys who are doing the job,

  • answering the bugle for assembly before the day’s work begins.

  • On Morro, where that ancient pile known as Morro Rock is an outstanding scenic attraction,

  • the old club is being expanded and developed in a manner which will make it attractive and useful to everybody.

  • The Conservation Corps camp has been established near the site of the old Cabrillo Country Club Colony.

  • A fine natural beach is being improved for bathing.

  • The old wooden pier is being replaced with a new pier of modern masonry construction.

  • Roads near the beach are being relocated to provide picnic grounds and parking areas.

  • There will be the usual outdoor ovens, freshwater outlets, tables, and benches.

  • The State Park Commission is interested in a purely conservation measure:

  • the development of a wild fowl refuge.

  • Dikes are being built to shut out the ocean from the low marshlands crisscrossed by inlets from the bay.

  • A freshwater supply will be provided for small lakes and lagoons to attract waterfowl.

  • Russian Gulch in Mendocino County, richly clothed with redwoods, rhododendrons, ferns, huckleberry, and salmonberry,

  • is another of California’s parks fronting on the Pacific.

  • The shoreline is sharply cut by inlets

  • in which ocean tides lash wildly to create ever-changing water spectacles.

  • Conservation Corps boys are policing the beach, clearing it of ocean wreckage

  • which comes with the tides from nowhere to interfere with the bather’s full enjoyment of the salt sea water.

  • Deep in the forest, they are modifying nature’s handiwork in accordance with modern civilization’s requirements.

  • Roads and trails are being made safe and easy for motor cars.

  • Careful intelligent work is making many a sluggish brook an even more delightful haunt

  • for the finny beauties which idle in its cold clear waters.

  • Fallen timber tangles that constitute an ever-present fire hazard are being removed.

  • Accommodations for picnickers are being provided.

  • Housing of the Conservation Corps and their equipment has called for a considerable amount of construction in the park.

  • The boys at Russian Gulch are fond of the manly art,

  • and the number of surprisingly expert boxers [...] the regularly organized tournaments which are held.

  • These Negro lads prove in their every action the value of the basic elements of the Conservation Corps idea:

  • worthwhile work outdoors in the fresh air and sunshine, good food, plenty of sleep, and an easy mind.

  • Looks like a real go!

  • A well-constructed squared circle,

  • gloves light enough to allow one to feel the sting of a punch, and even the jauntily worn bathrobes.

  • A cheering and enthusiastic audience.

  • These trophies, paid for by the boys themselves,

  • will recall some of the happiest days in the lives of these fine young Americans.

  • ["Reveille" played on bugle]

  • One million unemployed young men and war veterans were enrolled in the Civilian Conservation Corps

  • in the first two years of its existence.

  • Enrollees are taken from the states on a population percentage basis.

  • Their personal care is in the hands of the United States Army,

  • the country’s most experienced organization for a task of such magnitude.

  • Each state park Corps camp is set up according to a carefully organized plan.

  • A superintendent, employed by the state park division of the National Park Service, is in charge of the work.

  • Skilled workmen from the vicinity of each camp conduct all work that requires such supervision,

  • the enrollees serving as helpers.

  • The base pay of each enrollee is $30 per month,

  • $25 of which is mailed directly to his declared dependents.

  • Everything the enrollee requires is supplied to him:

  • clothing, comfortable barracks, good food; doctors are in regular attendance.