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  • There are so many long and complicated words

  • that relate to applying for

  • and getting a job in the U.S.

  • Today we'll study them and I'll make sure

  • you know the pronunciation.

  • I'll give you pronunciation tips as we go

  • and you'll learn about how certain suffixes,

  • like the T-I-O-N suffix, affects stress.

  • I want to get you excited for a new YouTube course

  • that I'm launching next week.

  • It's a 10 video course on getting a job in the U.S.

  • I've interviewed several experts that will help us

  • figure out exactly how to put together

  • your best cover letter and resume, how to interview,

  • and finally, how to follow-up and negotiate your salary.

  • And even if you're not looking for a job in the U.S.,

  • I'll put an English lesson into each video

  • and you'll study how to talk about yourself

  • and your work history, which can be really useful

  • outside of a job interview as well.

  • So, for 10 weeks starting next week, this new course,

  • which is part of a new YouTube program called

  • YouTube Learning, we'll be filling you up

  • with the best tips for getting a job.

  • I can't wait to get started on it with you.

  • To help us get ready, let's dive

  • into Job Application and Interview Vocabulary.

  • An application is what you might need to fill out

  • when you want to be considered for a job,

  • depending on the job.

  • Some jobs require you to fill out an application,

  • some require you to send in a cover letter, resume or CV,

  • and some require that you do all of the above.

  • The most common pronunciation

  • of the T-I-O-N ending is S-H, sh, schwa-N, shn.

  • And that's how it's pronounced here, shn.

  • Application.

  • Shn.

  • Always unstressed, said quickly.

  • With this suffix, stress is just before the suffix,

  • so the second to last syllable.

  • In this word, that's the third syllable.

  • Application, appli kay shun,

  • application.

  • Say that with me, application.

  • People who are applying for a job can be called applicants.

  • The word is similar, but the stress is different.

  • Now it's on the first syllable, applicants.

  • Say that with me, applicants.

  • Background, this is something you might get

  • asked about in a job interview.

  • It means, what led you to where you are now.

  • Your education and other job experience.

  • The K will not be released, background, background,

  • k k k, it will be pronounced background.

  • Back ground, a quick stop of air

  • for the K, then the G R cluster.

  • Background, compound words like this have stress

  • on the first word, so back, background.

  • Background, say that with me, background.

  • Benefits, this is what the employer offers to you

  • in addition to your payment.

  • For example, does your job come with health insurance,

  • a discount on products offered,

  • a pension or a retirement plan?

  • These are all benefits.

  • This is a three syllable word with stress

  • on the first syllable, benefits.

  • Career, this is your life's work.

  • All your working life in a given kind of job.

  • Some people will switch careers.

  • That means they choose to do something totally different

  • from what they've been doing, totally different

  • from what they've been trained in.

  • She's a social worker, but she's changing careers

  • and going to school to be a nurse.

  • Words with the E E R suffix have stress

  • on the suffix, the final syllable.

  • Career, career, say that with me,

  • career.

  • If you complete a particular training,

  • you might get a certificate, a certification

  • or say you're certified.

  • These all have different stress.

  • Certificate, stress is on the second syllable.

  • Certification, we already know with that suffix,

  • that stress is on the second to last syllable,

  • so that's the fourth syllable.

  • Certification, but if you say,

  • I'm an Apple certified trainer, certified,

  • then you'll put stress on the first syllable.

  • Certificate, certification, certified.

  • Now, what happens to the T.

  • It's a flap T except for certificate

  • where it starts the stressed syllable.

  • T is always a true T when it starts a stressed syllable,

  • but in the other two words, it's a flap T

  • because it doesn't start a stressed syllable

  • and it comes after an R, before a vowel,

  • erta, ser dadada,

  • certified.

  • Certified.

  • Certificate, certification, certified.

  • Say those with me, certificate,

  • certification, certified.

  • Compensation, this is what you get paid.

  • Salary or hourly wage.

  • It's a T-I-O-N ending word, what does

  • this tell you about stress?

  • Stress will be on the second to last syllable.

  • Compen say shun, compensation,

  • say that with me.

  • Compensation, cover letter.

  • Many jobs will ask you to send this along with a resume

  • when you're applying for a job.

  • It should all fit on one page and it introduces yourself.

  • It tells the employer some things that your resume can't.

  • As part of the Getting a Job in the US course,

  • we have a full video dedicated to how to write

  • an effective cover letter where we interview people

  • who've done a lot of hiring.

  • Be sure you watch that video, there are some key things

  • to pay attention to as you write.

  • Cover letter, the double T here is a flap T

  • because it comes between two vowels.

  • Cover letter, both end in an ending unstressed R sound.

  • Keep it simple and fast, er er er, cover, letter.

  • Cover letter, say that with me, cover letter.

  • CV and resume, CV stands for this longer Latin phrase,

  • which is pronounced in American English two ways.

  • Curriculum vie tee, or curriculum vee tie,

  • we almost never say that, it's always just CV.

  • And whenever something is referred to by initials,

  • we stress the last letter, CV, V is more stressed than C.

  • CV, CV, smoothly linked together like it's a single word.

  • CV, a CV is different from a resume

  • in that it will be longer and have more detail.

  • For most jobs in the US, you'll submit a resume,

  • which is a summary of your work history

  • with bullet points of achievements or responsibilities.

  • Putting together an affective, easy to read resume

  • is a crucial part of getting a job interview,

  • so in our Getting a Job in the US course,

  • we'll dedicate a whole video to do's and don'ts

  • for your resume to make sure it lands in the yes pile.

  • In resume, notice the letter S makes a Z sound.

  • Resume, resume, say these with me,

  • CV, resume.

  • Employee, employer, employs, employed , employment.

  • These all have the same stress on ploy.

  • However, employee can have stress on the third syllable.

  • Both pronunciations are correct.

  • Employee or employee, let's say them all with stress

  • on the second syllable, employee, employer,

  • employs, employed, employment.

  • Say those with me, employee, employer,

  • employs, employed, employment.

  • Fired, let go, laid off, these are ways

  • to talk about the tricky situation

  • in which your employer terminated you.

  • Fired implies that you did something wrong or poorly.

  • Laid off implies that the employer had to cut jobs

  • to save money, so not really your fault.

  • Let go, I think you could use this for either case.

  • A potential employer is going to want to know

  • why you left your previous jobs.

  • You'll want to study how to talk about these transitions

  • before you go in for a job interview.

  • Don't worry, I have you covered on that

  • in the Getting a Job in America Course.

  • I'll interview some experts who have

  • great advice about this.

  • Fired, it's tricky, it's the I as in by diphthong

  • followed by R, fi er,

  • I er, fired.

  • A light D sound at the end, fired.

  • Let go, a stop T here because the next word

  • begins with a consonant, let go.

  • Laid off, connect the two words with the D, laid off.

  • Laid off, say all of these with me.

  • Fired, let go,

  • laid off, follow up.

  • This is what you'll want to do after your interview.

  • Send a follow up email thanking them for their time

  • and showing excitement for the position.

  • Follow up, say that with me, follow up.

  • Hire, well, I hope you are the new hire.

  • I hope you do get hired.

  • This word rhymes with fire, I diphthong R.

  • Hire, hired, say those with me,

  • hire, hired.

  • Hobby, this is something that doesn't relate to work.

  • It's something you do outside of work as an interest.

  • And in the US, a potential employer might ask you

  • about hobbies to get a feel for what kind of person you are.

  • What are your hobbies?

  • Well, I love going to the opera

  • and the performing arts in general.

  • Hobby, hobbies, say those with me,

  • hobby, hobbies.

  • HR, this stands for human resources

  • and just like CV, stress is on the last letter.

  • This is the department that, at a company,

  • takes care of all the hiring of employees,

  • helping them with benefits, problems with others at work,

  • and so on, so if you submit an application for the job,

  • the first person to reach out to you

  • will likely be someone from HR.

  • Say that with me, HR.

  • Internship, this is when a student or someone who has

  • recently graduated works for a short and specific amount

  • of time for a company or organization to gain experience.

  • Some of them are unpaid.

  • Let's also talk about the word interview,

  • which is when an employer invites you in to ask questions

  • and get to know you more as he or she considers hiring you.

  • This is often done in person, but it can be done

  • over the phone or computer.

  • Internship, interview, they're both three syllable words

  • with stress on the first syllable.

  • They both begin with I-N-T-E-R,

  • but the pronunciation can be different.

  • With interview, innerview, interview, innerview,

  • we can drop the T after the N.

  • To say it that way sounds natural, with a T or with no T.

  • You can do either one, innerview, interview.

  • Both are acceptable and common pronunciations.

  • This is true when T comes after N, it can be dropped.

  • But not in internship, there we never drop the T,

  • so it's an exception to the rule about dropping T after N

  • if it doesn't start a stressed syllable.

  • Internship, internship, we have to have that true T.

  • Say that with me, internship,

  • innerview or interview.

  • Say those with me, innerview, interview.

  • To practice for your interview,

  • you'll definitely want to do a mock interview.

  • This is when you work with somebody

  • who will pretend to interview you for the job.

  • Practicing can make a huge difference in performance.

  • And this is something we'll talk about a lot

  • in the Getting a Job in the US course.

  • Mock, here the letter O makes the ah as in father sound.

  • Mock, mock interview, say that with me, mock interview.

  • Job description, this is usually about a paragraph

  • and it's written up by the employer.

  • Maybe someone in HR to describe the open position,

  • the job that's available.

  • You'll want to use the job description

  • when you're working on your resume,

  • and we'll talk about that in the video

  • on writing your absolute best resume,

  • coming up in a few weeks in

  • the Getting a Job in the US course.

  • Job, the O is pronounced as the ah as in father vowel.

  • Description ends in T-I-O-N, so which syllable is stressed?