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  • I'm Nancy Gibbs, I'm the Managing Editor of TIME and the person of the year for 2013

  • is Pope Francis [MUSIC]

  • I'm here with Radhika Jones the Deputy Managing Editor who

  • ran the whole POY

  • process so Radhika why the Pope? The Pope came on to the scene in March

  • with this kind of almost it was like fanfare and also the opposite a fanfare

  • he immediately made his presence felt in a way that that

  • seemed different from from Popes in recent memory.

  • He's now head of the Catholic Church 1.2 billion-strong

  • followers and the largest ongoing historical institution in the world so

  • he's in a position of immense power.

  • But he introduced himself as a man of great humility

  • even in a very short amount of time he's only been Pope for 9 months. He really has refocused a

  • conversation that's global

  • putting more emphasis on poverty and the poor putting emphasis on

  • inequality of wealth these are conversations that that we've been

  • having as a nation

  • that we've been having globally but without really an international figure

  • to preside over them. The pope has put himself in the position of being that figure.

  • [crowd noise]

  • How would you compare

  • him as a leader to the other leaders on the scene? He obviously

  • has less power and some literal sense he doesn't have

  • armies to deploy and yet his leadership seems like it has really as you say

  • captured people's imagination. Well one thing that we often talk about a person of the year

  • is that balance between institutional power and individual power

  • and in this case you have a man with with nominal

  • power but someone who's using it in ways but feel almost like

  • a grassroots initiative. We had many many conversations

  • about an interesting other man with a mission

  • who also came out of nowhere this year and that is Edward Snowden.

  • Edward Snowden a 29-year-old contractor

  • working with the National Security Agency suddenly

  • left his job flew to Hong Kong and revealed himself as the sources of major leaks from

  • the NSA and he

  • like the pope having disrupted the system has also continued to

  • to provide us with news over the past six months. You know, one of the things

  • that we love about putting this issue together is that as much as it's about

  • the choice and the person appears on the cover

  • we also want to put together magazine and

  • a package online that really captures the whole year and all of the

  • major news stories that happen and I would say that the story generated by

  • Edward Snowden

  • that of surveillance by the NSA and in general the concept of

  • digital surveillance and how that

  • security that comes from that intersects with personal privacy

  • that was a huge story this year.

  • Another figure that, also I think many of us would not have

  • recognized or imagined would be on the short list this year just a year ago

  • is the freshman senator from Texas Ted Cruz

  • [Crowd Noise]

  • Ted Cruz is a fascinating figure on this list and

  • in away he represents what didn't happen

  • this year in American government which is a lot of

  • lawmaking. I think it was the least effective congress in terms of bills

  • passed

  • in recorded history. Ted Cruz

  • is an incredibly fractious politician he instigated

  • the initiative to defund Obamacare that eventually led to the government

  • shutdown for 16 days.

  • Which some would argue really hurt the Republican brand.

  • Many would argue it really hurt Ted Cruz but if you talk to Ted Cruz about it he would say that

  • fallout from the shutdown has only made him a stronger force.

  • One name on the list who is not really a divisive figure of hero or villain

  • would be Syrian President Bashar Assad.

  • It was a particularly bad year in Syria. The Civil War has been going on for

  • a couple years

  • death toll has risen to a hundred thousand. There are now than

  • two million Syrian refugees and of course this summer saw the alleged use

  • by

  • the Assad regime of chemical weapons to kill not only adults but also

  • about 400 children something that really touched

  • the world and and suggested and to President Obama

  • among others that America and other countries should intervene

  • that didn't happen he's still there still

  • exercising a whole lot of power and still flummoxing leaders in the west

  • In terms of how to effect any change in regime

  • and he's a major player in the politics of the region which remains a real hot spot

  • globally.

  • And then the last person on our short list may be as surprised as anyone to find

  • herself there and it's Edith Windsor. We really wanted to capture this

  • shift that I think we've all seen happen in the United States over the past

  • year

  • to do with gay rights and gay marriage in particular. Edith Windsor's case

  • came before the Supreme Court this year and her victory resulted in the

  • overturning of DOMA the Defense of Marriage Act

  • which discriminated against gay

  • marriages in states where those marriages had been legal.

  • She's 84 years old. She was fighting

  • for the right to spousal benefits after her

  • spouse had died and in the time since that verdict came down she has become a real

  • icon of the gay rights movement and has really embraced that role it's wonderful

  • to see and

  • wonderful to read about.

I'm Nancy Gibbs, I'm the Managing Editor of TIME and the person of the year for 2013

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TIMEの2013年パーソン・オブ・ザ・イヤーに選ばれました。ローマ法王フランシス (TIME's 2013 Person of the Year: Pope Francis)

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    Alex Huang に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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