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  • Robert's terribly good until his batteries go down.

  • Energizer bunny.

  • That's true.

  • Ready?

  • Go.

  • Labour's leading indicators.

  • Okay, Robert.

  • It's very exciting, because...

  • We've got another election.

  • ...the shortlists are in for the Oscars.

  • But we're going to talk about the Labour leadership.

  • What should we call these?

  • The Jeremies?

  • The Jeremies.

  • Let's call them the Jeremies.

  • Excellent.

  • And we've got all our major players

  • here to help explain what's going on.

  • And of course, until April - don't get too excited,

  • folks - because until April, Jeremy

  • himself remains leader of the opposition.

  • But there are lots of people vying to succeed him and to be

  • deputy leader of the Labour party,

  • which is also its own elected position with its own mandate.

  • So we've got Jeremy benignly watching over it.

  • Yes, absolutely.

  • Let's put him up there.

  • We'll put him up here, watching benignly from the allotment.

  • And down here, this sort of large, shadowy figure

  • of Len McCluskey, head of Unite, the union.

  • Has been incredibly powerful as a backer of the Corbyn regime

  • in the Labour party.

  • So he's here because he obviously wants

  • to retain this giant influence.

  • He's got a lot to lose, hasn't he?

  • Will he be able to?

  • And Jeremy Corbyn's office was stuffed full

  • of McCluskey allies.

  • He had Karie Murphy.

  • He had Andrew Murray.

  • He had Jenny Formby as the party general secretary, and Seumas

  • Milne as well.

  • So he's probably got as much of an empire

  • to lose as Jeremy Corbyn.

  • Absolutely.

  • We've learned who's in the running, who's

  • got through the initial stage of being nominated by the MPs

  • and MEPs.

  • And so far, Len McCluskey's organisation has not yet

  • declared who it's officially backing,

  • but we think that it will be Rebecca Long-Bailey,

  • who is the Corbynite left candidate.

  • She's been desperately trying to say she's not the continuity

  • Corbyn candidate.

  • What's Barry Gardiner doing here?

  • Barry Gardiner...

  • look.

  • We were cutting out all the faces.

  • At the point where we were cutting out the faces,

  • Barry Gardiner was thinking about standing.

  • He didn't make it.

  • There will be no Gardiner's question time, sadly.

  • Say bye bye, Barry.

  • Rebecca Long-Bailey, shadow business secretary.

  • Very, very close to Jeremy Corbyn.

  • But she's not out in front.

  • No.

  • When this contest began, when it was clear

  • that Jeremy Corbyn lost the election,

  • the left of the party, the Corbynites,

  • needed a flag-waver.

  • Rebecca Long-Bailey had been in place for a long time

  • as their next-generation candidate,

  • a protege of John McDonnell.

  • She was the one they were all pinning their hopes on.

  • But it did feel like it's come a bit too soon for her.

  • She's only been in the Labour party for 10 years.

  • Only been in parliament for five.

  • She's perfectly able, but she is still learning the way,

  • and she hasn't fizzed out of the blocks, which means, therefore,

  • that the front-runner in the polls so far is Keir Starmer,

  • who is the shadow Brexit secretary,

  • the man who led the Remain argument within the Labour

  • party.

  • The fact that he is the front-runner may not

  • be entirely coincidental to the fact

  • that all of the Corbynite left is saying what they need

  • is somebody who's not from London, not a man, and not

  • a Remainer.

  • So you could see that in a run-off between these two,

  • those criteria would favour one candidate.

  • They would.

  • They would.

  • They would.

  • But I think we should just emphasise quite

  • how far out in front Keir Starmer is at the moment.

  • When you look at the nominations from the...

  • You were specifically told not to make

  • this prep sheet visible.

  • God, I'm a reporter.

  • You are defying the producers.

  • I've got a notebook.

  • What do you want me to do?

  • Keir Starmer has got 89 nominations

  • from the parliamentarian.

  • It's 102 isn't it?

  • Yeah, but it's plus the MEPs as well, remember?

  • Rebecca Long-Bailey has 33.

  • So they are the two front-runners.

  • But you can see the scale of the challenge

  • if the leader of the opposition was voted on just

  • by the parliamentary party.

  • But of course, it isn't.

  • And of course, that is roughly the level of nominations

  • that Jeremy Corbyn got when he stood.

  • He only just squeaked over the line.

  • Most of the MPs were against him.

  • So support from the MPs themselves is certainly

  • no guarantee of victory.

  • Although, as you were saying, the only poll that's been

  • conducted... have I got to this poll too early?

  • Yeah.

  • As you were saying...-

  • Park it.

  • Park it.

  • Lisa Nandy.

  • Park the poll, because I want to talk about Lisa Nandy.

  • He's my personal favourite.

  • I know we're completely unbiased,

  • but you'll like her very much.

  • And also, Jess Phillips got through.

  • Let's clear the deputy leadership candidate.

  • Yeah.

  • Let's get the deputies out of the way.

  • Leadership candidate's down.

  • Len.

  • I'm putting you on the floor for a minute, Len.

  • Don't take it personally.

  • Clive didn't make it, either.

  • Clive.

  • No, but talk about Clive, because you liked him.

  • I like him, personally.

  • I think he's interesting and clever.

  • He's a former soldier.

  • He could have been an interesting candidate

  • for the Labour party, but he's fighting for a lot of the same

  • left space that Rebecca Long-Bailey and, to some

  • extent, Lisa Nandy were fighting for in that Corbynite,

  • soft Corbynite place, and he just didn't make it.

  • So I'm afraid he...

  • Bye, Clive.

  • Bye, Barry Gardiner.

  • Bye, bye, bye, bye, bye, bye.

  • Out.

  • Now, Lisa Nandy.

  • She got 31, which is not bad if you consider that Rebecca

  • Long-Bailey, who's the official left standard bearer,

  • as you said...

  • for Lisa Nandy to get 31 and to be safely through

  • is quite good.

  • Jess Phillips and Emily Thornberry.

  • They just made it through.

  • 23.

  • 23 apiece.

  • ...each.

  • And in fact, even on the morning of the day

  • the nominations closed, Emily Thornberry

  • looked like she might not make it.

  • So that's quite a victory for her.

  • So if we ranked them in MP order, it goes like that,

  • doesn't it?

  • We've got Keir Starmer seen as, possibly,

  • quite sober, prime ministerial, and attempting to say, let's

  • put factionalism behind us.

  • I've got people in my campaign from both the left

  • and the right of the party.

  • Let's put the divisions behind us.