Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • I was born in Iran.

  • I've witnessed ballistic missiles coming

  • down;

  • that make me think that OK what are

  • the things that I would like to change.

  • What are the things that they would like to impact them at the

  • end of the day. I think we'd need to be responsible

  • for using any technology

  • in a positive fashion.

  • If there's anyone out there that could steer the

  • thrust of technology away

  • from our own demise

  • and toward the betterment of humanity

  • this could be the guy.

  • My name is Ali Hajimiri.

  • I'm an educator

  • and an engineer

  • and an inventor.

  • Since a very young age I was really curious to find out how things

  • work. Any kind of toy I had a

  • you know within a couple of days

  • it was ripped apart

  • and open

  • and torn into pieces.

  • And you know my parents were not a huge fan

  • of that throughout the process.

  • I tried to then build things myself.

  • At some point I tried to make a laser when I was

  • I think like 10 or 11

  • and I didn't succeed.

  • But Hajimiri made up for that failure

  • in his adult life.

  • Today he holds more than 90 issued

  • patents and along

  • with his tenure at Caltech carries a reputation

  • of making ideas that would otherwise sound

  • like science fiction a reality.

  • Things that I work on

  • are some of the inventions

  • if you will, that I've been involved

  • in, they span a large gamut lensless

  • cameras lensless projectors

  • and 3-D cameras,

  • radar on a chip,

  • self-heating circuits hand-held

  • diagnostic devices wireless power transfer

  • space based solar power.

  • They may appear kind of seemingly unrelated

  • to each other but they all rely on

  • this underlying concept

  • of a phase arrays.

  • The phase arrays is basically

  • a large number of small

  • elements working together.

  • Hajimiri's inspiration for phased array technology

  • comes from an unlikely place-

  • ants.

  • As a child took a big jar of

  • glass jar and I

  • was digging through an ant ant hill,

  • and then I took a whole bunch

  • of ants and just dumped them in that jar.

  • And within a couple of days they started

  • building the whole nest.

  • It was really amazing because it showed

  • how you can achieve very complex

  • things through interactions

  • of simple units.

  • The phased arrays is basically the army

  • of ants.

  • Now instead of ants carrying dirt. imagine

  • millions of tiny signals working

  • in concert to send energy wirelessly.

  • This array system is the basis

  • for Hajimiri's latest

  • and most ambitious project-

  • collecting solar power in outer space

  • and beaming it down to earth.

  • We are in the wireless power transfer laboratory

  • and we are looking at

  • is set up for demonstration

  • and testing of have wireless

  • power transfer.

  • Here you have a small

  • version of what would be collecting

  • power. We are basically creating

  • a beam and focusing of the energy

  • in this location,

  • and what you can see is that the energy is

  • being transferred wirelessly

  • and this would be the unit building block

  • making the space-based

  • generator power station.

  • This is an extremely important thing because

  • first of all it gives access globally

  • to energy and power.

  • It doesn't introduce any greenhouse

  • gases or any of that sort.

  • In the process of making up the energy.

  • But the idea of sending power to Earth

  • from space has some pretty high

  • profile detractors.

  • Space Solar Power.

  • OK. The stupidest thing ever.

  • Skeptics like Elon Musk believe

  • that after multiple power conversions

  • and the cost of launches

  • and the sheer scale of such a project

  • makes it far too expensive

  • and inefficient forever trapping it within

  • the confines of science fiction.

  • And if anybody

  • should think, should like space solar it should be me.

  • All right? I've got to go to rocket company

  • and a solar company.

  • But this is of little concern to a man

  • who has made his living defying conventional

  • wisdom.

  • He believes that the greatest innovations

  • come from an active imagination.

  • A lot of us are inspired by science

  • fiction I think science fiction is

  • essential to the way of thinking about

  • making useful

  • and interesting things.

  • You start with a concept that

  • doesn't exist that could have been articulated

  • in science fiction

  • and you trying to see what can you

  • do about that.

  • Can you do it in its entirety.

  • Can you do a variation of that

  • and that process that's part of the creative process

  • right. I mean engineering

  • is that discipline of creativity.

  • The key question is that how

  • can you make it in such a way that it's

  • feasible

  • and also economical

  • and to do that you have to take

  • a lot of different kinds of technologies

  • and bring them together.

  • Like an army of ants all

  • working together at the unlikely

  • intersection of science fiction

  • and reality.

  • You

  • know nothing is done in isolation.

  • No one person really.

  • And today I think ever was doing

  • things by themselves. You know

  • if you want to go fast

  • go alone if you want to go far take your

I was born in Iran.

字幕と単語

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B1 中級

エロン・ムスクはこのアイデアを疑う。アリ・ハジミリはそれに賭けている。 (Elon Musk Doubts This Idea. Ali Hajimiri Is Betting on It.)

  • 0 0
    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
動画の中の単語