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  • How about a Fun Fact?

  • Well, kinda fun.

  • They say there are no snakes in Hawaii?

  • And I thought The Aloha State couldn’t be any more perfect!

  • But all you ophidiophobes (that’s the fear of snakes), don’t do your happy dance just

  • yet.

  • Technically, there are no native snakeson land.

  • But there is a local species in Hawaiian waters, and it’s one of the most venomous out there!

  • Bright yellow and black, Hawaii’s Yellow-Bellied Sea Snake measures about 30 inches long and

  • swims in the warm coastal waters.

  • It’s a relative of the cobra, and its venom is extremely potent.

  • Although it might not hurt that much if it bites and youll probably just experience

  • a little swelling, experts warn that you shouldn’t shrug it off.

  • Seek medical attention immediately!

  • Luckily, that’s a bigif.”

  • Bites from the Yellow-Bellied Sea Snake are so rare that the Waikiki Aquarium couldn’t

  • find even one report of anybody in Hawaii being bitten by one.

  • Phew!

  • And Old Yellow Belly will never bite you on land because, while some sea snakes enjoy

  • the occasional jaunt out of the water, this one is strictly non-terrestrial.

  • That means he simply can’t come on land.

  • And if he does, he can barely move.

  • His belly is so big and tapered that he can’t slither on the ground!

  • They might thrash and wiggle to get somewhere, but their bodies are designed for swimming,

  • not slithering!

  • Well, that explains it!

  • But why are there no native land species?

  • That is, snakes that originate from the Hawaiian Islandsborn and bred, if you will.

  • For one, Hawaii is remote.

  • It’s an Archipelago (or a group of islands), and it’s a really isolated one.

  • Anywhere from 2,500 to 5,000 miles of ocean separate Hawaii’s islands from the nearest

  • landmass.

  • That’s too far for most animals to travel.

  • Even the best swimmers can’t swim that far.

  • This helps explain why Hawaii has such a wonderful variety of birdsabout 50 known species.

  • Unlike snakes, their ancestors could fly!

  • Once they got to Hawaii, there was no one waiting to gobble them up.

  • Nice!

  • Especially no snakes.

  • Snakes have such an appetite for birds and their eggs that they threaten avian populations

  • everywhere.

  • That’s why Hawaiians are incredibly vigilant about keeping out any snakes who try to visit.

  • Local authorities work hard to capture the ones thatve somehow made their way into

  • the state.

  • And they strongly discourage people from bringing them by making it illegal and heavily enforced!

  • Hey, how does a $200,000 fine sound?

  • And that’s not even the worst of it!

  • It’s easy to understand why a snake would want to come to Hawaii: warm sun, beautiful

  • beaches, all those birds to eat (not to mention frogs and insectsother snake delicacies.

  • Yum!).

  • But these legless reptiles need help getting there.

  • Since they can’t swim, they hitch a ride on a boator a plane!

  • (No, not just in the movies!)

  • That, and some people bring them intentionally!

  • But why would anybody bring one to Hawaii, especially when they threaten the birds and

  • you can get in big trouble for it?

  • Well, some people don’t know any better.

  • They think a snake will make a good pet.

  • Others might hope that theyll eat the pesky insects in their gardensin fact, there’s

  • a snake in Hawaii that does just that, but well meet him a little later.

  • And, of course, you always have those knuckleheads who just wanna break the rules.

  • Tsk tsk!

  • If only they’d consider how crucial it is to keep snakes out of Hawaii!

  • Take Guam as an exampleinvasive snakes devasted the bird population, eating up as

  • many as 10 of the 12 known avian species there.

  • That’s over 80%!

  • It’s heartbreaking, but Guam is working hard to help their birds recover.

  • But sometimes the person who brought the snake isn’t a criminalit can happen by accident.

  • In June of 2019, a 20-year-old man hopped on a plane in Florida and headed to Pukalani,

  • a nice spot on Hawaii’s island of Maui.

  • What he didn’t know was that, along with his toothbrush and swimming trunks, his backpack

  • held a secret hitchhiker: a non-venomous southern black racer!

  • Well, sometime before take-off, this babyshe was a newborn and only about 6 inches longslithered

  • into the man’s backpack.

  • The stowaway lay low all through the airport security screening and actually made it through

  • all those detectors!

  • Then, once she boarded, she kept quiet all through the flight.

  • No one wouldve ever known about this snake’s journey.

  • She wouldve grown up to 6 feet in length and probably wouldve filled her gullet

  • with lots of local birds.

  • Had it not been for the observant Hawaiian who owned the place where the man was staying.

  • When the tourist reached Pukalani, the owner of his vacation rental spotted the baby snake

  • as she slithered out of the backpack to make her escape.

  • He called the police, who then alerted The Department of Native Ecosystem Protection

  • Management.

  • That’s a mouthful.

  • And together, they detained the snake overnight.

  • Until she could be transported to Honolulu (and booked!).

  • Ok, that was an accident, but what do you do if you live in Hawaii and your Uncle Joe

  • gives you a snake for your birthday?

  • (He never was that great at gift-giving!)

  • You don’t want your uncle to get in trouble for his ill-advised present, but you also

  • don’t want your birthday gift slithering around eating all the tropical birds!

  • Plus, you kinda like the scaly little guy.

  • Youve already named him: Slim!

  • There’s no way youre flushing your friend down the toilet (don’t even think about

  • it!), but youre worried how hell be treated if you turn him in.

  • Snakes are banned in Hawaiiyou don’t wanna see Slim in handcuffshe doesn’t

  • even have hands!

  • Oh, no!

  • What do you do?!?

  • Don’t worry!

  • The people at Hawaii’s Department of Agriculture have goofy uncles and favorite pets too.

  • That’s why they have an amnesty program that lets you turn in any snakes you happen

  • to possess and with no penalty!

  • Theyll take good care of Slim.

  • He’s not a bad snakehe’s just in the wrong place.

  • None of the surrendered snakes are ever harmed.

  • And when you miss Slim, you might even be able to visit him at the zoo!

  • If you want further proof that Hawaii doesn’t think all snakes are bad, consider this:

  • In 2018, the state’s Department of Agriculture invited 4 brown tree snakes to come and live

  • in Hawaii.

  • Permanently!

  • Brown tree snakes pose that exact kind of invasive threat that Hawaiians fear mostlike

  • what happened in Guam.

  • So why did they deliberately bring four of these guys into the state?

  • Isn’t it their job to capture them and keep them out?

  • Yes!

  • And, since practice makes perfect, these snakes are working hand in hand orwelltogether

  • with the DoA in a big game ofHide and Seek.”

  • By hiding and waiting, they help train dogs to sniff them out.

  • After training, these dogs go to airports and other locations where they sniff out hidden

  • snakeslike Slim and the backpack baby.

  • Cool!

  • Butother than stowaways and contraband visitors, there really are no snakes in Hawaii,

  • right?

  • Wrong again.

  • There’s one snake that’s so common, your chances of seeing him are pretty high.

  • Well, if that’s trueand everybody sees this one kind of snakehow come the myth

  • that there are no snakes in Hawaii persists?

  • Becausethese guys are so tiny that most people mistake them for worms!

  • Snakeologistsok, theyre really called herpetologists, but you know what I meanthink

  • that The Hawaiian Blind Snake probably came from the Philippines sometime in the 1930s.

  • That’s almost a hundred years, so theyve had plenty of time to spread around.

  • Theyre all over Hawaii today.

  • These guys are only 6 inches long, theyre super skinny, and they eat stuff like ants

  • and termites.

  • So, you often find them in gardens.

  • And it’s no wonder people mistake them for worms!

  • But you won’t now!

  • Look closely, and youll see that they have a nifty little snake tongue!

  • Oh yeah, like their name implies, theyre almost blind, but they can recognize light.

  • Also, theyre not venomous, so no danger here!

  • Hawaiian Blind Snakes are cool, but, technically, not native Hawaiians.

  • So you could still make a case for there being no snakes in the island stateas long as

  • you ignore everything I just told you!

  • So really -- what’s your chances of seeing a snake in Hawaii now?

  • —(wait for it) – Slim to none.

  • Hey, if you learned something new today, then give the video a like and share it with a

  • friend!

  • And here are some other cool videos I think you'll enjoy.

  • Just click to the left or right, and stay on the Bright Side of life!

How about a Fun Fact?

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B1 中級

ハワイには、州を助ける少数のヘビを除いて、ヘビはいません。 (There Are No Snakes in Hawaii Except for the Few That Help the State)

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    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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