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  • Japan has a culture that’s always fascinated the rest of the world. Weve all heard about

  • this country’s unique mix of tradition and futurism. But I was surprised to find out

  • that sumo is NOT the most popular sport there, and it takes mad skill to prepare a “river

  • pig”!

  • Oh yeah, and bathing is done a little differently than you might be used to. In Japanese culture,

  • the main cleaning routine is done at night, in SEVERAL steps. Follow closely please.

  • First, run a hot bath and hop inthe shower! You just need to lightly wash any sweat or

  • dust off your body. Make sure youre totally rinsed and

  • Next, have a soak in that bath, just long enough to open your pores. You might add some

  • Epsom salt and other skin-nourishing ingredients. Kinda like brining a turkey for Thanksgiving.

  • And anyone with long hair, make sure it doesn’t touch the bath water! Pull it up in a high

  • bun if you need to. Then climb out of the bath, and let any ingredients you added soak

  • into the water.

  • Time to head back to the shower for another rinse! This second rinse isn’t always done,

  • but itll remove any more stubborn grime. Since the room is probably steamy by now,

  • your body temperature will be up, and this will open the pores even more. It also gets

  • the metabolism going!

  • Now youre ready to double-dipand have a long, luxurious soak in that bath. Make

  • sure the water is still hot! Well, I guess you don’t have to worry about that if youre

  • using a Japanese tubthey have a built-in heater so that the water stays hot!

  • In Japan, bathing is more for relaxation, and it goes beyond just the bodyit cleanses

  • the soul too. Rooted in the belief system of Shintoism, a hot evening bath washes the

  • stress of the day away. Plus, your skin is getting the benefits of those extra ingredients

  • you added.

  • If youve ever been to Japan, youll know that public bathing is very popular too. There

  • are public bathhouses called sentos in nearly every town. Because of their location, the

  • Japanese can enjoy bathing in hot springs as wellthose are known as onsens. In

  • earlier times, many Japanese houses didn’t have bathtubs or a heating system for the

  • water or home, so public bathing became the solution. Now, it’s more of a cultural tradition.

  • A sento or onsen is usually part of an inn that has pools and showers and is stocked

  • with soap and shampoo. People can socialize and relax after a long day at work. Sign me

  • up!

  • Now it should come as no surprise that the private Japanese bathroom is an oasis! The

  • tub is deeper than what we see in the West so that the water reaches you all the way

  • to your chin. (Hence, why you need to pull your hair up so that it doesn’t touch the

  • water!) It’s traditionally made of cypress wood, which will smell amazing once the tub

  • is filled with hot water and the room is steamy.

  • Once youre all done poaching in there, it’s also good to know is that the toilet

  • is in a separate room than the bathtub. That way, the bath is all about cleanliness. There

  • are even special slippers to wear only in the room with the toilet!

  • Since were on the topic of the Japanese evening routine, let’s talk about dinner

  • (and some other cool facts about the Land of the Rising Sun)!

  • - If youve been invited to a traditional dinner in Japan, always wait to be told where

  • to sit. There will be a guest of honor, which is always the oldest person in the group.

  • Theyll be seated in the center of the table. Try a bit of everything on your plate using

  • your chopsticks.

  • - Chopsticks come with their own set of rules, but remember never to cross them or use them

  • to point! Also, don’t rub them together to get rid of any wood shavingsthey don’t

  • do that in Japan!

  • -In Japan, slurping your soup or noodles is like saying, “This is delicious!” and

  • My compliments to the chef!” So if you visit, go ahead and slurp away!

  • - Many parts of Japan are quite crowded, so their homes and lawns have to be small. One

  • Japanese expression says that their gardens are so small that theyll fiton a cat’s

  • forehead.”

  • - In Japan, you can get your license for a motor scooter or similar small road vehicle

  • starting at age 16. But you must wait until youre 18 to get your license to drive a

  • car! That came as a surprise to me as an American, but maybe there are other countries like that?

  • What’s the minimum driving age in your part of the world? Let me know down in the comments!

  • - Japan is known for its beautiful tea ceremoniesand that delicious Matcha! But this might surprise

  • you: Japan drinks about 85% of the coffee that Jamaica exports! Coffee is everywhere,

  • from the big brands we all know to small, family-owned coffee shops. But coffee shops

  • in Japan aren’t big social centers or impromptu officesit’s in and out. Well, that’s

  • how I like my morning coffee run as well!

  • - Here’s one for sports fanseven though sumo wrestling is the national sport, baseball

  • tops the list of the most popular! It’s a lot like the American version, but some

  • technical things are a little differentthe field, strike zone, and the ball itself are

  • smaller in Japan. If youre interested, soccer follows baseball in popularity, then

  • golf, tennis, and sumo in 4th place.

  • - Go to this wonderous country, and you might see Pikachu on a plane! Japan’s largest

  • airline, All Nippon Airways, has painted Pikachu and other Pokémon on the sides of their airplanes,

  • making them fun and colorful!

  • - I’m sure you know you have Japan to thank for giving us karaoke. But have you ever wondered

  • what the word means? It translates asempty orchestraso you better fine-tune your

  • singing skills! I’m also glad we decided to just borrow the original Japanese word.

  • Hey, you guys up for some Empty Orchestra tonight?” – that’s a mouthful!

  • - The blowfish, orfuguin Japanese, is a highly poisonous fishthat nonetheless

  • is eaten as a delicacy! It’s so dangerous, in fact, that Japanese chefs have to complete

  • 11 years of training if they want to serve it in their restaurant! Yes, it takes PERFECT

  • skill when the stakes are that high! On a lighter note, “fuguliterally meansriver

  • pigin Japanese! Wow, that’s unappetizing on so many levels

  • - Saving face and avoiding embarrassment is very important there – I’d say in a lot

  • of other places too! But here’s the surprise: getting caught in the rain without an umbrella

  • is considered foolish! Don’t worry, thoughthere are countless convenience stores where

  • you can pop in and get yourself an umbrella.

  • - If youre looking for a place to spend your golden years, youll be in good company

  • in Japanabout 23% of the population is over 65 years old. In fact, it’s also the

  • country with the most centenarians! (That’s people whove celebrated their 100th birthday.)

  • - Japan has 16 national holidays. There are so many crammed into late April and early

  • May that this is referred to as Golden Week. One of those includes Greenery Day on May

  • 4th, which celebrates nature. But there’s also separate Marine Day in July (dedicated

  • to the greatness of the ocean) and Mountain Day in August (to commemorate, well, mountains!).

  • - School plays a huge part in Japanese life. Lessons on being kind-hearted, studying hard,

  • and feeling empathy would be a typical kindergartener’s school day. Even the right way to clean is

  • taughtin most schools, students clean the classroom at the end of every day!

  • Yeah we didn’t talk about sushi. Love it though, can’t get enough. Maybe in an upcoming

  • video. Leave me a comment if you agree.

  • Hey, if you learned something new today, then give the video a like and share it with a

  • friend! Here are some more cool videos I think youll enjoy. Just click to the left or

  • right, and stay on the Bright Side of life!

Japan has a culture that’s always fascinated the rest of the world. Weve all heard about

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なぜ日本人は夜に入浴する人が多いのか (Why Many Japanese Bathe in the Evening)

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    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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