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  • [Intro]

  • It's time to tear down the beautiful, translucent backed HTC U12 Plus.

  • It's had a rough day.

  • It's buttons have come off and it's bend out of shape, but I found a nifty little trick

  • using my metal tweezers.

  • I apply pressure to both sides of the missing power button hole and it allows me to turn

  • the phone off, which is important for a teardown.

  • Then the back panel lifts up and away from the phone body.

  • Normally, unless you want to drastically flex your phone in half, you should use heat and

  • a thin metal pry tool to remove the back.

  • I'll use a plastic pry tool to unplug the fingerprint scanner ribbon cable, and the

  • translucent blue glass is released entirely from the phone.

  • It has that gradient effect going on where it's more clear in the center than it is on

  • the outside.

  • This gives us a pretty good look underneath the glass into the phone, and it seriously

  • looks awesome.

  • HTC has added a decorative loincloth over the battery with a nice printed circular design.

  • This is just a decoration and has no functional value.

  • The NFC is functional though, and that wraps around the upper half of the phone above the

  • plastic.

  • There are 8 normal Phillips head screws holding that top plastic in place.

  • I'll remove those screws and pull it away from the phone.

  • It has the gold contact pads on the back that allow the NFC to communicate with the motherboard.

  • The next thing is to remove the decently sized 3500 milliamp hour battery, unclipping the

  • Lego-like battery connector from the motherboard, along with both of the charging port extension

  • ribbons.

  • Thankfully the whole battery can pull out and away from the phone bodynot a whole

  • lot of effort is needed.

  • No magic pull tabs, which is totally fine, as long as that adhesive doesn't have a death

  • grip.

  • Another thing that's removable is the SIM card tray, which conveniently has an expandable

  • memory SD card slot.

  • Bonus points for that.

  • The little ribbons at the corner of the motherboard are for the super annoying pressure sensors

  • along each side of the phone.

  • I'll show you more of these in a second.

  • The middle orange ribbon is for the display, and then we have the other pressure sensitive

  • ribbon that includes the power and volume buttons over here.

  • Before we get a good look at those strips though, we have to remove the motherboard.

  • I'll pull off these little black wire cables.

  • All of this might seem kind of complicated, but this is nothing compared to how unorganized

  • UTC used to be.

  • HTC's older phones were more unorganized than Picasso and a paper shredder.

  • I unclipped the dual front-facing cameras and pulled the motherboard out from the frame.

  • The little guy is built simple enough.

  • It does have dual rear cameras plugged into the back, each with their own Lego style connector.

  • The normal 12 megapixel camera comes with OIS, but the 2x zoom lens does not have any

  • hardware stabilization...electronic, maybe, but nothing that's visible from the outside.

  • HTC does always have to stick some weird stuff in their design, like this dual LED flash

  • on it's own removable ribbon cable.

  • It's probably built this way so that it would line up dead center on the back panel, between

  • the camera lenses.

  • But it still kind of feels like HTC forgot about it and had to add it back in last minute.

  • I reattached both rear cameras into the motherboard like little Legos, and HTC is actually one

  • of the first companies to put 4 cameras into a smartphone.

  • Huge thumbs up for innovation, but my favorite was 2 years ago back with the HTC 10 when

  • they added optical hardware stabilization to the front-facing camera, which was also

  • a first.

  • This year that front stabilization is no more, but we have 2 identical 8 megapixel cameras

  • now.

  • Win some, lose some.

  • Down at the bottom of the phone we have these 6 Phillips head screws holding the loudspeaker

  • and charging port.

  • I'll remove the top plastics...and would you look at that.

  • Instead of a circular coin vibrator like we've seen in the past on HTC phones, they're using

  • a rectangular taptic engine like we saw inside of the Pixel 2 and basically all of the iPhones.

  • Some people really care about their vibrations and taptic motors are top of the line for

  • vibrator fanatics.

  • Loudspeaker comes out next.

  • This is one of the two stereo speakers, HTC counts the earpiece as the second one.

  • It has the same gold contact pads on the back for communicating with the phone.

  • And finally, the charging port.

  • Super tiny little guy with a blue rubber ring around the tip to help with that ip68 water

  • resistance rating inside the phone.

  • It's fun that HTC has accessorized their internal coloring with the blueness of the back glass

  • panel.

  • Now let's talk about one of the biggest flaws in HTC's design: the pressure sensitive buttons

  • and squeezable sides.

  • If you remember, the buttons aren't actually buttonsthey are little unmoving protrusions

  • in the phone frame that can come off if persuaded.

  • And once that button is off, the button's functions is unusable on the phone unless,

  • you know, you carry a spare pair of tweezers like I showed at the beginning of this video.

  • Who doesn't have one of those?

  • The pressure sensitive ribbons are the electronic components that capture each short and long

  • squeeze of your hand through that soft aluminum.

  • They run along each side of the phone.

  • Each side is essentially the same.

  • I'll pull off this long plastic protector, and then start working on removing the ribbon.

  • The problem here is that it looks like HTC has permanently adhered the ribbon to the

  • frame of the phone, making button replacements, or squeezed motion replacements, impossible

  • without replacing the whole frame anyway.

  • Even while attempting to be gentle, my ribbon was torn, and portion of the contact pads

  • were left attached to the frame rendering my phone unusable.

  • You never realize how often you use a power button until it's gone.

  • Here's a closeup look at the contact points remaining on the inner side of that metal

  • frame.

  • Normally in a teardown video, I would assemble the phone so that it's working after I'm done.

  • It's pretty annoying that something so inexpensive and common as a button is rendering my $800

  • phone useless.

  • To make matters worse, the screen of the HTC U12 is permanently glued to the frame of the

  • phone and would be very difficult to harvest for parts.

  • So reclaiming any value out of this phone is going to be difficult since those buttons

  • are gone.

  • The HTC U12 Plus is currently in the lead for the least repairable phone of 2018...but

  • at least the charging port rubber matches the back.

  • Speaking of which, since my phone is now dead, if you own a translucent blue U12 Plus and

  • end up accidentally breaking the back glass because, you know, a case interfered with

  • your squeezy bits, tweet me a picture of the carnage and I'll trade you my back glass that's

  • still in one piece – I won't be needing it.

  • The HTC 10 was one of my favorite phones of 2016 back in the day.

  • I vote that HTC start heading back that direction and ditch the squeezies...but, that's just

  • my opinion.

  • Let me know what you think down in the comments.

  • And thanks a ton for watching.

  • I'll see you around.

[Intro]

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B1 中級

HTC U12 Plus ティアダウン - 「ボタン」は直せるのか? (HTC U12 Plus Teardown - Can the 'buttons' be fixed?)

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    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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