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  • Hey, dudes.

  • I'm Hilah, and today on Hilah Cooking we're making churros.

  • So, a churro walks into a bar and the bar tender

  • is like, "Hey!

  • We don't serve donuts here man,."

  • And the churro is like, "What?

  • What are you talking about?

  • I'm not a donut."

  • And the bar tender is like, "Are you sure?"

  • And the churro's like, "Yeah.

  • I'm churro!"

  • To make the dough for the churros, we've got some water and a pot.

  • What I'm about to show you is a Mexican version of

  • churros.

  • So, churros are a fritter, originated in Spain.

  • The original dough only had oil, I mean, flour and water mixed up together and then

  • fried.

  • I think, I'm talking to my friend about this, I think that when the

  • French occupied Mexico, they kind of changed the recipe a little bit and

  • they made it more like a French pastry.

  • So, that's what I'm going to show you, because I think it's a

  • little bit nice and richer.

  • So, this is just water, butter, sugar, and salt, then mix this up together

  • until the butter melts and the water boils.

  • Now we're making what's called a choux pastry, C-H-O-U-X, and I made these

  • before when we did the gougeres, which is like a savory type thing

  • that's baked.

  • So, it's the same basic dough that we're starting with, but

  • then we're going to cook it differently from that by deep-frying it.

  • Okay, so once your liquid reaches a good rolling boil, we can turn the heat

  • off.

  • And I've got flour here, just regular all-purpose flour.

  • Just dump it in all at once and then start mixing it up.

  • And it's going to look lumpy and shitty at first, but it will all come

  • together in a few seconds.

  • Okay, so there, there we go.

  • There's . . . once it's kind of sort of a play dough

  • looking ball, I'm going to transfer it into a separate bowl because this

  • pot is still really hot and we want it to cool off a little bit.

  • Whew!

  • If you wanted to do this with a mixing bowl, that's totally, totally fine.

  • I'm going to show you how to do it by hand just to show you that it can be

  • done since I know a lot of people don't have an electric mixer.

  • So, I just want to let this cool for about five minutes.

  • You can spread it out a little bit, cool off.

  • So we'll see you back in about five.

  • All right, once it's stopped steaming we can add the eggs.

  • So, this is two eggs that I've beaten up with some vanilla

  • extract.

  • I'm just going to add about half of this.

  • Oops!

  • Or a little more.

  • Start mixing it vigorously.

  • And that's why we let it cool, so that the egg

  • would just immediately cook when it hit the hot flour.

  • And again, it's going to look like a total disaster,

  • but eventually it will all come together, and it will come together really

  • fast if you use an electric mixer and just do it on medium speed.

  • Yeah.

  • So when it starts sounding a little sloppy sexy like that, it will

  • also start coming together into a ball.

  • Sometimes it's easier to kind of hold it like this and okay, good.

  • Put the rest of egg, but once it's nice and smooth we're ready to go.

  • I'm going to fit it into a pastry bag.

  • I'm going to show you how I put mine together

  • because I've had this for like over a decade and I just recently figured

  • out the right way to assemble it.

  • I don't even know if they make this kind anymore.

  • But anyway, so I recommend using like a pretty heavy bag because this is

  • such a thick dough, and then you're going to drop your little tip in.

  • You want to use this pretty wide star piping tip.

  • You can also buy a little press called a churrera that is especially

  • made for piping churros, but anyway I'll use this.

  • Put that in first, wait, yeah this is right.

  • Then this part goes in.

  • I always have to think about it.

  • Yeah, that's right.

  • And then screw this on the outside.

  • Okay, so that's assembled and then we can fill it with our dough.

  • Pack it in there, twist off the top, and get it started.

  • Okay, good.

  • So now, over here I've got my oil heating.

  • It's about three inches of corn oil.

  • I'm using corn oil or you could use peanut oil or canola oil, or

  • whatever you like to fry in, but those are all good choices.

  • I'm letting it heat up 'til it's 350, and then we'll start

  • frying, so just a couple more minutes.

  • Okay.

  • Once your oil's hot, you're going to hold the bag in your non-

  • dominant hand and squeeze off lengths right into the oil, and then cut them

  • off about three to four inches.

  • You can use a knife, but scissors work pretty well if you have some kitchen shears.

  • And just fry like maybe three or four at a time, so you don't overcrowd

  • the pot and cool the oil off too much.

  • And they don't take very long.

  • You'll see they kind of fizz around a lot and then they'll begin to float, and you

  • can kind of turn them if you need to.

  • It should just take three to four minutes total.

  • Okay.

  • And when they're nice and brown and most of the bubbles have

  • subsided, we can scoop them out, and drain them on a little paper towel or

  • paper bag or something.

  • And don't be too upset if some of them kind of

  • burst open a little bit.

  • That happens usually if your oil's a little bit

  • too hot.

  • Mine was a little bit hotter than 350 when I put these in.

  • So, then let those cool just a couple of minutes,

  • fry a few more.

  • Okay.

  • So you want to just let them drain for a moment, but then while

  • they're still kind of warm, I've got some cinnamon sugar mix here that I'm

  • just going to roll them around in that, and that's why the batter itself is

  • not terribly sweet because you roll them in this sugar mixture.

  • In Mexico, these are often served with a hot chocolate

  • type of dipping chocolate, and then in a lot of places in South America they

  • actually fill them with caramel, or chocolate, or vanilla, or even

  • fruit pastes.

  • So, they become kind of like a jelly doughnut that way, but

  • this is more like what you get at fairs and stuff here, although those are

  • usually like, you know, a foot long.

  • This is a little bit more reasonable size.

  • These are best served pretty quickly, but if you need to hold them, you can

  • do the sugar and then put them on a rack in the oven at 200 or 200 degrees,

  • and they'll keep nice, and warm, and crispy there for about an hour.

  • Awesome.

  • Yeah!

  • These are so fun and this batch makes a whole lot.

  • So you have all of the fried, delicious snacks that

  • you can eat.

  • So, for more fun stuff that you could make and a fry daddy, check out my

  • corn dogs video from a long, long, long, long time ago.

  • And then also, I did a cake doughnut for Halloween a few years

  • ago, that's pumpkin spice cake doughnut holes.

  • They're so, so, so good and I'm going to try one of

  • these.

  • I'll eat the ugly one.

  • Oh, wait, it's like a smiley face or a frowny face.

  • Mm!

  • You hear that crunch?

  • And the inside's nice and tender.

  • Oh, man!

  • These are so good.

  • I could eat so many of them, and I would feel bad

  • afterwards, but not so bad that I wouldn't do it again.

  • Thank you so much for watching.

  • Please check out HilahCooking.com for this printable recipe and all printable recipes.

  • And I'll see you guys next time.

  • Don't forget to subscribe, and leave me a comment or a question, and

  • I'll see you later.

  • All right.

  • Thanks for watching.

  • Bye!

Hey, dudes.

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ホームメイドチュロス|チュロスの作り方| ホームメイドチュロスの作り方|ヒラ・クッキング (Homemade Churros | How To Make Churros! | Hilah Cooking)

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    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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