Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • Believe it or not, Star Trek's sci-fi escapades have often been based on actual events that

  • happened here on Earth.

  • Let's boldly go where no fan has gone before and look at some of the true stories that

  • inspired Star Trek.

  • Star Trek loves to talk about politics and social justice, but at the same time, the

  • original series seemed to contradict the message, what with its long track record of ditzy women

  • in impossibly short skirts who lack any sort of self-reliance or tenacity.

  • If you've ever found that annoying, it might comfort you to know that Star Trek writers

  • Herb Solow and Robert Justman often used racy content to distract television censors of

  • the time from the show's otherwise political content.

  • In the second season episode "A Private Little War," Kirk contemplates the ethics of intervening

  • in someone else's war, a fairly controversial subject for the time.

  • "We are wise enough to know that we are wise enough not to interfere in the way of a man,

  • or another world."

  • During the episode, he kisses a partially-dressed woman, with an open mouth, no less.

  • That particular scene was actually written for the purpose of drawing attention away

  • from the episode's storyline, which was a thinly veiled commentary on whether or not

  • the United States should get involved in Vietnam.

  • It was a pretty genius move, and it worked.

  • The episode aired in February 1968, just after the launch of the Tet Offensive.

  • Over a century after Jack the Ripper stopped terrorizing the Whitechapel district of London,

  • we still can't stop talking about him.

  • He's been featured in films, television shows, comic books, video games, and pretty much

  • every other type of media you can think of.

  • And for some reason, Star Trek used Jack the Ripper as inspiration for the 1967 episode

  • "Wolf in the Fold."

  • A woman causes an accident that gives Scotty a concussion, so Kirk and McCoy take him to

  • a pleasure planet that winds up looking rather suspiciously like the Whitechapel district

  • of London, circa 1888.

  • While they're down there, women keep getting killed, and Scotty keeps getting found holding

  • a bloody knife, so things aren't looking good for everybody's favorite engineer.

  • "This happened under Argelian jurisdiction.

  • If they want to arrest him, try him, even convict him, I have to go along with it."

  • "But he's suffering from a severe concussion!"

  • In case you were worried, Scotty isn't the killer.

  • If he were, we would've missed out on decades of his charming Scottish brogue.

  • "What are you standing around for?

  • Do you not know a jail break when you see one?"

  • No, the real killer is the actual Jack the Ripper, who as it turns out is a formless

  • entity that needs fear and also foggy streets to survive.

  • What a relief.

  • Not every based-on-a-true-story Star Trek episode is meant to be a complex political

  • allegory on truth and justice.

  • Some are written simply for the purpose of being silly and entertaining.

  • Some aren't even based on true stories.

  • Instead, they're inspired by conspiracy theories that are probably just nonsense.

  • Season four of Deep Space Nine tackles the complex social problem of people who actually

  • think the government might be hiding aliens at Area 51.

  • In "Little Green Men," Quark, Rom, Odo, and Nog are accidentally sent back in time to

  • Area 51.

  • "The 20th century?

  • You mean we traveled back through time?!

  • More than 400 years!"

  • The episode handily explains the 1947 crash of the high-altitude balloon that spawned

  • decades of conspiracy theories and culminated in the 2019 storming of Area 51 for what it

  • really was: the crash of a Ferengi shuttle piloted by a race of super-capitalist humanoid

  • aliens with very large ears.

  • Sometimes it takes a big thing to shine a light on important social problems.

  • Before the riot at Attica prison in 1971, many American inmates were kept in deplorable

  • conditions.

  • At Attica, prisoners were allotted one shower a week and one roll of toilet paper a month.

  • Things came to a head when the prisoners rebelled, taking hostages and releasing a list of demands.

  • Notably, the prisoners' list of demands didn't include "let us out of prison."

  • It was mostly just a plea for more humane conditions, including religious freedom, an

  • end to the censorship of their personal correspondence, and better living conditions.

  • "They've forgotten about us."

  • "So what do we do?"

  • "We make them remember."

  • The Attica riot changed prisoner treatment in America, and it was the inspiration for

  • a key incident in Deep Space Nine's two-part episode "Past Tense."

  • In this time-traveling episode, writer Ira Behr drew from the Attica prison riot when

  • constructing the 2024 Bell Riots, an incident in which the occupants of a repressive Sanctuary

  • District for homeless and unemployed people rebel.

  • As far as Star Trek's Earth is concerned, the event helped usher humans towards the

  • peaceful, post-scarcity society enjoyed by Kirk and friends.

  • "The Troubles" is the phrase used to describe the conflict in Northern Ireland between 1968

  • and 1998.

  • While the mostly Protestant unionists wanted Northern Ireland to remain part of the United

  • Kingdom, the mostly Catholic nationalists, led by the Irish Republican Army, or IRA,

  • wanted to join the Republic of Ireland.

  • The confrontation resulted in the deaths of around 3,600 people.

  • Star Trek: The Next Generation's season three episode "The High Ground" is about a violent

  • conflict between the people of the planet Rutia Four and a bomb-planting group of rebel

  • separatists called "Ansata."

  • The parallels between Ansata and the IRA are so thinly veiled that Data and Picard actually

  • have an on-screen conversation about the parallels between Ansata and the IRA.

  • Data even says that the conflict in Northern Ireland is an example of successful terrorism.

  • "I have been reviewing the history of armed rebellion, and it appears that terrorism is

  • an effective way to promote political change."

  • The episode aired in 1990, when the real conflict was still very much a thing, and the content

  • was alarming enough to the British powers of TV that it was heavily edited in the United

  • Kingdom and Ireland, which included the removal of the Data/Picard conversation.

  • As of 2109, it has still never been shown in its entirety on the Emerald Isle.

  • Star Trek's habit of drawing on real life sometimes even dips into medical mysteries

  • of the past in order to flesh out a character or just add some depth to a story line.

  • One such example is the similarity between the memory condition suffered by Captain Archer

  • in the Enterprise episode "Twilight" and the story of a real-life medical case from 1953.

  • In the show, Archer suffers from a disorder caused by parasites that live in non-linear

  • time, which causes all new memories to fade within a few hours.

  • "They haven't caused any tissue damage, but they're impairing certain synaptic functions.

  • They're preventing you from forming new long-term memories."

  • The storyline seems to be based on the case of Henry Molaison, a 27-year-old assembly

  • worker who suffered from severe epilepsy.

  • Molaison underwent brain surgery to remove his hippocampus, and his seizures stopped.

  • But he also lost the ability to form new memories.

  • Molaison could remember some things from the past but nothing from the moment he emerged

  • from the surgery.

  • In the Deep Space Nine episode "Far Beyond the Stars," Sisko is given vision by a bunch

  • of mysterious wormhole aliens.

  • In the vision, he's living in 1950s Harlem, working as a sci-fi writer.

  • During his time in his dream, he deals with racist publishers who refuse to publish his

  • story on the grounds that it has a black protagonist, and he encounters various characters who look

  • an awful lot like his crewmates back home.

  • Fortunately, the episode is blissfully free from ruby slippers and talking scarecrows.

  • "But it wasn't a dream."

  • It seems likely that the episode was inspired by the Comics Code Authority's 1956 decision

  • to disallow the publication of an Entertaining Comics story titled "Judgement Day," which

  • featured a black protagonist.

  • Judge Charles Murphy said outright that he wouldn't approve the story if it had a black

  • protagonist.

  • Entertaining Comics published it anyway, even though its lack of official approval meant

  • that it wouldn't get wide distribution.

  • "Oh, I like it alright, it's good, it's very good.

  • But you know I can't print it."

  • "Why not?"

  • "Oh come on, Benny."

  • After that, Murphy embarked on a personal vendetta against the publisher, personally

  • reviewing everything they submitted for approval.

  • The company went out of business a few years later.

  • In 1988, the USS Vincennes shot down Iran Air Flight 655.

  • The incident happened toward the end of the Iran-Iraq War, while the Vincennes was exchanging

  • fire with Iranian ships in the Persian Gulf.

  • The official US Navy account of the incident said the passenger plane was mistaken for

  • an enemy jet.

  • Still, 290 civilian passengers and crew members died when the Vincennes shot two surface-to-air

  • missiles at the plane.

  • In the Deep Space Nine episode "Rules of Engagement," Worf has been accused of a similar crimedestroying

  • a civilian ship carrying 441 people.

  • Much of the episode is a courtroom drama in which the Klingon Empire is trying to get

  • Worf extradited for war crimes, and Sisko is trying to stop that from happening.

  • The story ends predictably.

  • As it turns out, the whole thing was just a setup, and Worf actually fired on a ship

  • full of dead bodies.

  • "Isn't it possible that the ship he saw was sending out false sensor images, and that

  • this whole affair was staged?"

  • As for the real-life incident, well, it's unfortunately not that black and white.

  • Real people died on Air Flight 655, and we probably won't ever know exactly what happened.

  • Star Trek often has the uncanny ability to address problems that we're still discussing

  • decades later.

  • In the original series episode "The Ultimate Computer," the Enterprise becomes the proud

  • owner of a new computer called the M-5, which is capable of running all the ship's systems

  • with minimal human intervention.

  • This is immediately not cool as far as Kirk and McCoy are concerned, though Spock is predictably

  • fascinated by the idea.

  • "I don't like it, Jim.

  • A vessel this size cannot be run by one computer."

  • "We are attempting to prove that it can run this ship more efficiently than man."

  • You can probably see the ending coming from several million light years away.

  • M-5 isn't really the ultimate computer, it's the ultimate killing machine.

  • In a mock battle meant to demonstrate its abilities, M-5 takes down another starship

  • with lethal force.

  • When Kirk convinces it that it's a killer, it shuts itself down, thus preventing a Skynet-style

  • takeover of the Federation.

  • The episode was a reaction to the rise of the computer, and genuine concern about what

  • would happen if we gave machines too much power and control.

  • It deals with questions we still ask ourselves today, like what happens when human beings

  • automate everything, and then everyone is left without a job and a purpose?

  • "Twenty?

  • I can't run a starship with 20 crew."

  • "The M-5 can."

  • "And what am I supposed to do?"

  • Over the years, Star Trek has asked plenty of questions about war, territory, and unprovoked

  • attacks.

  • "The Enterprise Incident," a third season episode of the original series, was based

  • on the Pueblo Incident of 1968, which involved an American communications monitoring ship

  • and some North Korean naval vessels.

  • The Koreans claimed the USS Pueblo was in Korean waters, while the US claimed it was

  • in international waters.

  • After the Koreans opened fire and then boarded the ship, they caught the captain destroying

  • electronics and documents.

  • The crew was brought back to North Korea, where they endured 11 months of interrogation

  • and torture.

  • The Star Trek version of this story is almost exactly the same.

  • The Enterprise is just outside the Romulan Neutral Zone on an "observation mission,"

  • when a bunch of Romulan ships show up and open fire, forcing Kirk to surrender.

  • Before the crew is taken prisoner, Kirk orders the destruction of top secret equipment.

  • Then, he and Spock are taken to a Romulan outpost, where they're threatened with interrogation

  • and torture.

  • "But there are Romulan methods completely effective against humans and human weaknesses."

  • After that, the two plotlines diverge somewhat.

  • Spock and Kirk fake their deaths, and then Kirk and McCoy put on pointy ear disguises,which

  • is evidently enough to make the Romulans not recognize them, so they can infiltrate the

  • Romulan outpost.

  • But we're going to guess that none of those last bits happened during the real incident.

  • Star Trek couldn't pass up an opportunity to comment on the Cold War in general and

  • Chernobyl in particular.

  • So nearly three decades before HBO's Chernobyl miniseries became a gleam in the eye of some

  • cable TV executive, Star Trek was busy creating an allegory on the incident with Star Trek

  • VI: The Undiscovered Country.

  • In the film, there's a major explosion at an energy facility on Praxis, the Klingon

  • moon.

  • Like the Russians, the Klingons pretend the accident is no big deal, because if they admit

  • otherwise, they admit weakness, and not being weak is like the Klingons' whole deal.

  • In The Undiscovered Country, the Klingon chancellor even has a familiar name: Gorkon.

  • In case you need a nudge, that kind of sounds like "Gorbachev."

  • Gorkon decides to open peace talks with the Federation, and there's even talk of dismantling

  • the starbases and other military structures around the Neutral Zone.

  • The real life storyline and the fake one start to diverge at this point, because no one would

  • like the movie if the starbases came down, and everyone had a party.

  • Or would they?

  • Check out one of our newest videos right here!

  • Plus, even more Grunge videos about your favorite TV shows are coming soon.

  • Subscribe to our YouTube channel and hit the bell so you don't miss a single one.

Believe it or not, Star Trek's sci-fi escapades have often been based on actual events that

字幕と単語

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B1 中級

実際の出来事に基づいていたスタートレックのエピソード (Star Trek Episodes That Were Based On Actual Events)

  • 0 0
    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
動画の中の単語