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  • 10 Astronomical Events That Will Happen In Your Lifetime

  • Number 10 Halley's Comet

  • Halley's comet was named after astronomer Edmond Halley, who calculated its period of

  • orbit, it is the only known short-period comet that is regularly visible to the naked eye

  • from Earth.

  • It is seen from Earth every 75-76 years and so, technically, some lucky humans will get

  • to see it twice in their lifetime.

  • The first Halley's Comet witnessed in the space agein 1986 – saw several spacecraft

  • approach its vicinity to establish its composition. High-powered telescopes also observed the

  • comet as it swung by Earth.

  • This fly-by provided the first observational data on the structure of a comet's nucleus,

  • the mechanism of comets, and tail formation.

  • But for those of you who missed it in 1986, don't worry because it'll next appear

  • in 2061.

  • In the meantime you can see its remnants every year. The Orionid meteor shower, which is

  • spawned by Halley's fragments, occurs annually in October.

  • Number 9 Near Earth Asteroid Flyby

  • On April 13th, 2029, an asteroid called 99942 Apophis will pass between the Moon and Earth.

  • Following its discovery in 2004, Apophis - which is the size of three-and-a-half football fields

  • - gathered the immediate attention of scientists and the media.

  • Initial calculations of its orbit by astronomers indicated a 2.7 percent possibility of an

  • Earth impact during the close flyby, so naturally humanity feared for the end of the world.

  • Fortunately though, further analysis by NASA showed that Apophis will miss Earth by 31,300

  • kilometers. That's actually closer than some geostationary satellites, which orbit the

  • Earth at a range of 36,000 km, but still far enough away that we don't need to fear for

  • our lives.

  • The flyby will be one for the record books, as it will be the closest flyby of an asteroid

  • of its size in recorded history - and it could be the last chance astronomers have to get

  • an up close look at Apophis for a very, very, long time.

  • Number 8 Solar Eclipse

  • Okay, so we are slightly cheating with this one, as solar eclipses can usually be seen

  • somewhere on Earth each year, but 2027 has something special in store.

  • Solar eclipses occur when the Moon passes between the Sun and the Earth, and it fully

  • or partially blocks the Sun. In a total eclipse, the disc of the Sun is fully obscured by the

  • Moon, whereas in partial and annular eclipses only part of the Sun is obscured.

  • Typically, the duration of a total eclipse is in the range of 2-6 minutes. But the longest

  • solar eclipse to date lasted for 7 minutes, 28 seconds. It happened around 743 BC and

  • would have been visible across Southern Africa.

  • The next time a solar eclipse will have a duration of this length will be on 16th July

  • 2186, but most of us won't be around to see that.

  • So instead set yourself a reminder for Monday 2nd August 2027, when the second longest solar

  • eclipse of the century will occur. It will have a maximum duration of 6 minutes and 23

  • seconds.

  • It will pass through the Straits of Gibraltar then across the North African coast, before

  • dipping down to Yemen and Somalia.

  • Number 7 Supernova

  • On average, a supernova goes off twice a century in a galaxy the size of the Milky Way, so

  • scientists believe the magnificent astronomical event is imminent.

  • Supernovae are explosions that occur at the end of life for stars more massive than our

  • Sun. The massive star explodes when it has used up all its hydrogen fuel and its core

  • collapses just before it explodes, ejecting most of its mass into space.

  • They are triggered in two ways: either by the sudden re-ignition of nuclear fusion in

  • a compact star, or by the collapse of the core of a massive star.

  • The last one was spotted three decades ago, on February 23rd, 1987. Nicknamed 'Supernova

  • 1987A', it blazed with the power of 100 million suns for several months following

  • its discovery and was one of the brightest exploding stars in more than 400 years.

  • But when will the next supernova occur? Well, in 2013 astronomers from Ohio State University

  • calculated that a supernova occurring within our galaxy will be visible from Earth sometime

  • in the next 50 years.

  • It would be visible to telescopes but there's also a 20% chance that the supernova would

  • be visible to the naked eye in the night sky.

  • Number 6 Venus Occults Jupiter

  • The last time Venus and Jupiter passed in front of - or occulted - one another was nearly

  • 200 hundred years ago, in January 1818.

  • At this time in history, the Battle of Koregaon between the British East India Company and

  • the Peshwa faction of the Maratha Confederacy was in full swing.

  • Those mid-battle were probably not focusing on the night sky, and even if they were, only

  • observers in a remote island of Japan were likely to see the occultation if they made

  • a very special effort to look for it in the bright morning twilight.

  • Skip ahead to the 21st Century and for the first time since 1818, on 22nd November 2065,

  • Venus will pass directly before Jupiter and form into a single, bright star, low down

  • in the dawn skyline.

  • Get your telescope ready for the event, because it will be almost impossible to view with

  • the naked eye, as it will be occurring during the daytime and in close proximity to the

  • sun.

  • Number 5 Leonid Meteor Shower

  • First noticed in 1833, this rare astronomical phenomenon occurs when Earth passes through

  • the orbit of periodic comet Tempel-Tuttle.

  • Leonid meteors are caused by tiny meteoroids that burn up in our planet's atmosphere as

  • Earth passes close to the dust-strewn orbit of Tempel-Tuttle.

  • Skywatchers have observed major Leonid meteor showers every 33 years or so from 1833, when

  • the meteor shower was said to have produced a whopping 100,000 meteors an hour.

  • Most years, Leonid storms are a minor event, boasting no more than 10 to 15 shooting stars

  • per hour. But on very rare occasions when this dense filament of dust plows directly

  • into our planet, meteor rates can soar to 100,000 per hour or more.

  • If you want to catch this spectacular sight, Tempel-Tuttle will next cause a major Leonid

  • meteor shower in 2031.

  • Number 4 Planetary Alignment

  • The possibility of an alignment between all of the planets in the solar system is very

  • rare. The closest that the eight planets will come to being aligned will occur on May 6th,

  • 2492.

  • But unless we figure out how to bring cryogenically frozen corpses back to life, none of us will

  • be alive to witness that astronomical event.

  • On the bright side, space scientists estimate that there will be a rare planetary alignment

  • of Mars, Mercury, Venus, Jupiter, Saturn and the crescent Moon on September 8th, 2040.

  • That's just 23 years away, and is much more doable.

  • Clustered well to the east of the Sun, the planets will stage a breathtaking show at

  • 7:30 pm, so mark your calendars now!

  • Number 3 Supermoon

  • In November 2016, stargazers worldwide enjoyed a rare event, a Supermoon that was 14% bigger

  • than its normal size. This was the closest the moon had been to earth since January 26th,

  • 1948.

  • If you missed out on catching a glimpse of the 2016 supermoon, there's an even better

  • astronomical event on the horizon. The closest supermoon of the century will occur on December

  • 6th, 2052, and it will be a once in a lifetime experience.

  • The termsupermoonis typically defined as a full moon that coincides with the lunar

  • orb's closest approach to Earth.

  • In 2052 our celestial neighbor will be just around 140,000 kilometers away. But what possible

  • impact could it have on us?

  • Well, many studies over the years have been aimed at finding out any statistical connection

  • between the moon - particularly the full moon - and human biology or behavior.

  • Reliable studies comparing the lunar phases to births, heart attacks, deaths, suicides,

  • psychiatric hospital admissions and epileptic seizures among other things, have time and

  • time again found little or no connection.

  • Number 2 Transit Of Earth From Mars

  • As of 2017, humans are not currently on any other planets - well, as far as we know - so

  • if a transit of Earth were about to occur anywhere soon, we could not see it. The one

  • noteworthy future exception, though, is Mars.

  • For those of you unsure what we mean by 'transit of Earth from Mars', it essentially means

  • when the Earth passes directly between the Sun and Mars, obscuring a small part of the

  • Sun's disc for an observer on the Red Planet.

  • No one has ever seen a transit of Earth from Mars, but if NASA's plan to get humans living

  • on Mars by the 2030s goes ahead, this could be possible for the next such transit, which

  • will take place on November 10th, 2084.

  • This transit will be the first and only time that this phenomenon will occur in the 21st

  • century, with the next one predicted for 2394. And by then, we should definitely have colonized

  • the planet.

  • Number 1 The Birth Of A Star

  • Look up to the stars in 2022, because one of the night sky's most visible constellations,

  • Cygnus, will be getting a new addition, and everyone on Earth will be able to see it.

  • Located about 1,800 light-years away, the star system KIC 9832227 in Cygnus has long

  • been a focus of study.

  • For years, the pair of glittery specks in this system have been circling around each

  • other, moving closer and closer, and now astronomers believe they will soon merge in an explosive

  • event known as a nova.

  • It'll be a momentous occasion for scientists as it's the first time they have ever been

  • able to predict the birth of a new star and this will allow them to observe the process

  • as it unfolds.

  • For us average folks, it's going to be pretty damn extraordinary too, being able to witness

  • a once in a lifetime astronomical event without the use of a telescope.

  • Thanks for watching today's video, we hope you enjoyed it! And if space is what you're

  • into why not check out 10 Unknown Signals From Outer Space and we'll see you next

  • time!

10 Astronomical Events That Will Happen In Your Lifetime

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あなたの生涯に起こる10の天文イベント (10 Astronomical Events That Will Happen In Your Lifetime)

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    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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