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  • On this episode of China Uncensored,

  • 10 things people get wrong about Taiwan.

  • Welcome back to China Uncensored.

  • I'm Chris Chappell.

  • I'm in Taipei,

  • the capital of a country that most countries

  • don't even recognize as a country.

  • Why not?

  • Because...well, it's complicated.

  • And "complicated" is why so many people get things about it wrong.

  • Here are 10 common misconceptions people have about Taiwan.

  • Misconception #10

  • It's officially called Taiwan.

  • No.

  • Most people call this place "Taiwan".

  • But its official name is the Republic of China.

  • That's different from the People's Republic of China.

  • Taiwan is technically the name of a land mass, not a country.

  • Taiwan is the main island,

  • this big one that's shaped like a sweet potato.

  • But the Republic of China government actually has domain

  • over an archipelago of 166 islands.

  • Most of them are really small and no one lives there.

  • But for simplicity, most people still call the country "Taiwan".

  • And honestly, that's less confusing than calling it the Republic of China.

  • It's a bit like calling The Netherlands "Holland".

  • It's...good enough.

  • And that's what I'm going to mostly use in this episode for simplicity.

  • Personally, I think we should go back to calling Taiwan

  • the Republic of Formosa.

  • I mean, look at this flag.

  • It's so cool!

  • What's that, Shelley?

  • It only lasted five months?

  • Fine.

  • Misconception #9

  • Taiwan wants to declare independence from China.

  • Any way you measure it, Taiwan is a sovereign state.

  • Taiwan has its own government, passports,

  • currency, trade agreements, and so on.

  • But the People's Republic of China,

  • this one, claims Taiwan is just a province of China,

  • even though that is objectively not true.

  • In reality, Taiwan is independent.

  • But the People's Republic of China has said

  • it would invade Taiwan if it "declares" independence.

  • The solution?

  • The current Taiwan government's position is that

  • they already "are" an independent country,

  • so there's no need to "declare independence".

  • Problem solved.

  • Misconception #8

  • There is a One China Policy,

  • which most of the world, including the US agrees with.

  • No.

  • There is no single One China Policy.

  • The common explanation for the One China Policy

  • is that both the Republic of China and the People's Republic of China

  • claim to be the legitimate ruler of both Chinas,

  • but they just disagree about which of them is that legitimate ruler.

  • This is sometimes referred to as the 1992 consensus.

  • But people also disagree about what the 1992 consensus is

  • or if it even exists in the first place.

  • Just like Pluto.

  • So what are the different One China policies?

  • The People's Republic of China has what it calls the One China Principle,

  • which is that there is only one legitimate China,

  • and the People's Republic of China is it.

  • And that Taiwan is a province of the PRC.

  • But their One China Principle doesn't recognize that Taiwan

  • or other countries might have a different view.

  • Decades ago under the KMT Party,

  • Taiwan had a similar view,

  • except saying that "they" were the single legitimate China.

  • But now it's 2020.

  • And more and more people in Taiwan don't view themselves as Chinese.

  • They have their own identity as Taiwanese,

  • and they no longer have any illusions

  • that one day they'll retake the mainland.

  • Sometimes you'll see media reports

  • that mention America's One China Policy.

  • And sometimes those media reports will say that America

  • agrees with the PRC's One China Policy.

  • These media reports are wrong.

  • The US does have its own One China Policy.

  • It comes from the 1972 Shanghai Communiqué, which says, essentially,

  • that the US acknowledges that China and Taiwan

  • both view themselves as the legitimate China.

  • But the US's policy doesn't take sides

  • on which one is the legitimate China.

  • It also doesn't explicitly state the sovereign status of Taiwan.

  • Diplomacy: the art of making things so confusing

  • that everyone stops trying to figure them out.

  • Misconception #7

  • Taiwan is a renegade province of China.

  • Or a "breakaway" province of China.

  • No, that's pure communist propaganda.

  • At no point in history was the island of Taiwan

  • a province of the People's Republic of China.

  • In fact, there were only two brief points in history--

  • both less than 10 years long--

  • where Taiwan was actually ruled as a province of China.

  • And those were during previous eras--

  • before the People's Republic took over China.

  • During Taiwan's history,

  • it has also been ruled independently,

  • as well as by the Dutch, Spanish, and Japanese.

  • Calling Taiwan a "renegade province"

  • or a "breakaway province" of China

  • is just buying into the propaganda.

  • Misconception #6

  • The PRC wants "re-unification".

  • Well, they say they do.

  • But built into that phrase is more propaganda.

  • Taiwan can't "re-" unify with the People's Republic of China,

  • since as I mentioned,

  • it was never unified in the first place.

  • Chinese speaking people aren't so easily fooled.

  • So in Chinese,

  • the People's Republic of China just calls it "unification".

  • Misconception #5

  • Taiwan is culturally Chinese.

  • In Taiwan, the most common language is Mandarin.

  • But it's not strictly Chinese culture.

  • During most of the last millennium,

  • the island of Taiwan was ruled by various aboriginal people,

  • who spoke their own languages and had their own customs.

  • In the mid-1600s,

  • Taiwan was occupied by the Dutch and the Spanish.

  • And from 1895 through 1945, it was ruled by Japan.

  • Sure, Taiwan had Chinese immigrants,

  • but it was not mainly a Chinese place.

  • After World War II,

  • the winners--i.e.

  • America--

  • made Japan leave Taiwan.

  • The US gave the island to their ally,

  • the Republic of China government,

  • which at the time ruled all of China.

  • But that rule only lasted a few more years.

  • The communists started a civil war, and won.

  • In 1949, the Republic of China government fled to the island of Taiwan,

  • where they re-established their government along with military rule,

  • and enforced the Mandarin language and Chinese culture.

  • Misconception #4

  • Taiwan's national day celebrates the founding of their country.

  • No.

  • Taiwan's national day is not an independence day.

  • It actually celebrates October 10, 1911--

  • the start of the Wuchang uprising

  • that eventually overthrew the Qing Dynasty.

  • That uprising eventually led to the founding of the Republic of China.

  • It can be confusing, because the People's Republic of China

  • has their own national day.

  • And theirs does celebrate their founding.

  • Misconception #3

  • Most people in Taiwan want unification with mainland China.

  • No, that's pure communist propaganda.

  • But the opposite isn't quite true either.

  • There's a wide variety of views.

  • "Unification" is a spectrum.

  • After seeing what happened in Hong Kong,

  • most people in Taiwan don't want unification under that system,

  • although there's a minority of stupid people

  • who somehow think it wouldn't be so bad.

  • But some people in Taiwan would be happy to unify,

  • "if" China becomes a democracy.

  • Especially if the Chinese Communist Party is completely gone first.

  • And then there are some people in Taiwan

  • who want complete independence,

  • no matter what.

  • But it seems that most people in Taiwan--

  • including both major political parties--

  • want to keep the status quo of not being unified,

  • and waiting to see what happens.

  • The political parties mainly disagree over

  • how much to engage with China economically,

  • but both want to maintain Taiwan's sovereignty.

  • Misconception #2

  • Political interference in the election was not effective

  • because Tsai Ing-wen won the election.

  • No.

  • Tsai "did" win the election on January 11.

  • If you saw our previous video,

  • you know that Hong Kong was a big factor in Tsai's win.

  • As well as her campaign's anime adventure game called

  • "What?!

  • I am Taiwanese third-year high school from Class 2,

  • suddenly fell into a different world and met the president?!"

  • I'm never going to get tired of saying that.

  • But the Chinese Communist Party had tried really,

  • really hard to stop Tsai from winning.

  • They interfered with the elections in a variety of ways,

  • including supporting her opponents' campaigns,

  • spreading fake news on social media,

  • and even buying up Taiwanese media,

  • and having them run anti-Tsai propaganda.

  • That actually influenced a lot of people.

  • It just wasn't enough to stop Tsai from being elected.

  • And the Communist Party's political interference

  • is not going away, either.

  • And Misconception #1

  • The US president can't meet with Taiwan's president

  • because we don't have formal diplomatic ties.

  • The last time a sitting US president visited Taiwan was 1960.

  • After the US switched diplomatic alliances to China in 1979,

  • US presidents have avoided

  • all direct communication with Taiwan's presidents,

  • so as to not anger the Chinese regime.

  • Except that one phone call 3 years ago.

  • But you know, Trump will do Trump.

  • But there's no law actually stopping the US and Taiwan presidents

  • from having phone chats, or even a face-to-face meeting.

  • All it takes is a Taiwan president who has a strong mandate from the people.

  • and a US president who isn't afraid of pissing off communist China.

  • I mean, the US doesn't have official diplomatic relations with North Korea,

  • but that didn't stop "this" meeting from happening.

  • Or this meeting.

  • Or this meeting.

  • So there's no reason Trump can't meet with

  • a democratically elected leader and ally.

  • I guess we'll have to wait and see what happens.

  • So what do you think?

  • Leave your comments below.

  • Once again, I'm Chris Chappell.

  • See you next time!

On this episode of China Uncensored,

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台湾について人々が誤解している10のこと (10 Things People Get WRONG About TAIWAN)

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    Annie Huang に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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