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  • This is part two of our negotiation

  • class, vocabulary. And this is preparing

  • goals. So we're going to look at the

  • vocabulary, all related to helping you

  • prepare your goal. Remember preparing

  • goals is really a key part of

  • negotiation. There's really no way to

  • know have you done a good job or a poor

  • job if you don't have clear goals. So

  • let's go ahead and look at some of the

  • vocabulary we often use in preparing

  • goals. The first one is "accept". Of course

  • accept meaning that you can accept the

  • proposal or you can accept the terms. You

  • can accept the price, so something is

  • okay. So we would often use this by just

  • saying I accept your terms or I

  • accept your price. Or you could say I

  • do not accept your price. You might think

  • reject would be a way to say it, but you

  • often in negotiation say, "We cannot

  • accept that...", meaning we would like to, but

  • we can't. We cannot accept it. Whereas

  • reject, reject sounds much more negative,

  • and like there's something you really

  • hate or don't like about it. Do not

  • accept or cannot accept just means I'd

  • like to but we just can't. It doesn't

  • work. Okay, assume. The word assume here

  • meaning that you assume something is

  • true. You take it for granted. You think

  • it's true even though it may not be true.

  • And this is often a word you can use

  • when you're talking about the other

  • side, and they assume something is true.

  • So you can say, "Well, you assume that our

  • production cost is ten dollars per unit,

  • but actually our production cost is

  • twelve dollars per unit." You cannot

  • assume that. You cannot think that's true

  • because it might not be true. So this

  • assume can be used in many ways, but I

  • think here we're saying that you need to

  • be careful don't assume anything about

  • the other side. And in your negotiation,

  • you can use this word assume to tell the

  • other side that they're wrong about

  • something. Don't assume

  • that that's true. You can tell them that.

  • Benefit, of course a benefit is something

  • that helps you. Something that's good. It

  • is a benefit, so when you do a

  • negotiation, when you're involved in

  • negotiation, of course, you want to look

  • for your best benefits. You want to look

  • for benefits, and you might also be

  • considering explaining to the other side

  • what are the benefits they can get from

  • you. So while they may be they want to

  • have a low price, maybe they also can

  • consider some other benefits, not just

  • low price. So you may explain to them, "We

  • cannot give you a lower price, but we

  • have other benefits we can give you. For

  • example, we can give you our brand new

  • product first before other buyers, so

  • that's a great benefit for you." So

  • benefit is a really great word to be

  • using. Brainstorming, of course, is a very

  • popular idea where we brainstorm. We

  • think of things, anything, even crazy

  • ideas. And this will be very useful in

  • your negotiation of course because this

  • is a behavior you probably want to try

  • when you're preparing for your

  • negotiation, when you're getting ready,

  • when you're thinking of the strategy. I

  • mean you're thinking of how you're going

  • to approach it. Maybe you need to get

  • with your team and brainstorm a

  • little bit about the negotiation. So some

  • crazy ideas maybe are okay. You don't

  • criticize, and maybe, you come up with an

  • idea that's a little bit crazy but

  • really good at the end, after you

  • brainstorm a bit. Compensation,

  • compensation is payment for something

  • that has been done, some work that is

  • completed. Now compensation can be used

  • in many ways. It's a little bit like

  • benefit, only compensation is a bit more

  • clear, and that is saying you do A and I

  • give you B. So you come and wash my car,

  • and I pay you 10 US dollars for washing

  • my car. So I do something, I get something.

  • I do something for you, you give me something.

  • This is compensation idea. But in a

  • negotiation, we can use it much wider,

  • meaning that I can compensate you for

  • sacrificing something now. So if you can

  • give me

  • a faster shipping time, I can compensate

  • you later by giving you a different

  • benefit. So compensation usually is a

  • one-to-one relationship, but it also can

  • be a bit more general, saying in general

  • you do something good for me, and I'll

  • compensate you. So that compensation what

  • is it? What is the compensation

  • I get for helping you now? "Competitor", of

  • course, a competitor is the company that

  • you're working against or that you're

  • competing with inside the marketplace. So,

  • usually, your competitor would be another

  • company that's selling a similar product

  • or a different product but to the same

  • customers you are that may replace your

  • product. Where customers buy that product,

  • they don't buy your product, so that's a

  • competitor. So, of course, competitors are

  • used in your negotiation because you

  • often talk about competitors. Now you can

  • talk about competitors in many ways. But

  • one of the most effective ways is if I'm

  • a buyer and you're a seller, I can tell

  • you directly I don't have to buy from

  • you. I can buy from someone else. I can

  • buy from your competitor. So a competitor

  • is very clearly someone, another company

  • that I can use against you, even though I

  • maybe not have done that. Maybe I'm not

  • serious to do that, but I can say I'm

  • going to do that. So a competitor is very

  • effective that way. "Consider", meaning

  • think about. Now, this is a really great

  • word. It's a word that's a very simple

  • word, right? But we use this often around

  • negotiation because we want to emphasize

  • that we are going to consider your

  • proposal. And it's very important, in a

  • negotiation, that you let the other side

  • feel that you are listening to them. And

  • one way to listen is to say this

  • consider. "We will consider your offer. We

  • have already considered your offer very

  • carefully, but we cannot accept it." Right?

  • So this is not always saying we do

  • something positive or we do something

  • negative. Consider, you're going to think

  • about it. A great word to use in your

  • negotiation to make the other side feel

  • comfortable and respected.

  • "Convince", of course, convince meaning

  • that you're going to, in a way, help the

  • other side to believe that what you're

  • saying is true. So this convince is kind

  • of the opposite of assume in a way. In a

  • negotiation, because you're not assuming

  • it's true, you're convincing them it's

  • true. You're going to go ahead and

  • explain it to them why it's true. So in

  • your negotiation, you can use this word

  • very effectively by saying it straight

  • forward and saying, "I'm going to try to

  • convince you that this is a great deal.

  • Are you convinced yet? I'm going to

  • convince you that this is a really good

  • opportunity." So it's very positive that

  • way, and you can go ahead then and try to

  • convince the other side. And you can ask

  • them, "Are you convinced yet?" Now, of course,

  • if they're smart, they're always going to

  • say, "Well, we're not really convinced yet."

  • And then you can say, "Well, we can try

  • another thing to convince you. How about

  • if I give you a discount on the shipping

  • terms? Does that convince you?" So that's a

  • great word to use. "Cooperate"-- of course,

  • cooperate meaning work together. And when

  • you work together, you cooperate. In

  • negotiation, we're already cooperating in

  • a way because we're negotiating. Remember

  • for negotiation to happen, you have to

  • have at least two sides. If there's no

  • cooperation, then the negotiation breaks

  • down, and there will be no negotiation. So

  • there is always some level of

  • cooperation. You may cooperate more,

  • meaning you work together better or less,

  • meaning that you really, it's really

  • tough to work things out. In our

  • negotiation RPGs, you may find that there

  • are other groups you are easy to

  • cooperate with. You have a good

  • relationship with them. Maybe that's good

  • to seek them out often, so you can

  • cooperate and help each other. That's

  • perfectly normal. "Delay"-- delay here

  • meaning to put off to another time. Delay

  • is really important in negotiation

  • because it's a kind of tactic, where you

  • can

  • specifically say, "Well, your offer is

  • something we're going to consider very

  • carefully. But we cannot decide now." And

  • the other side may say, "Well, we need you

  • to decide now because we have other

  • things to do or we have other buyers

  • waiting or we have other sellers we need

  • to talk to." And you say, "Well we're going

  • to wait until tomorrow or I can't decide

  • I need to talk to my boss". That's a delay.

  • So, usually, this word is a kind of a

  • tactic or strategy, in some cases, an

  • overall strategy that you want to take

  • your time. So delay is not something you

  • would often say, but it's something you

  • can say inside your team: "Let's make sure

  • we delay as long as possible" would be a

  • normal thing to say inside your team. You

  • would not say that to the other side

  • though. Because the other side, you want

  • to tell them, "Oh, I'm working as fast as I

  • can. We really, this is the fast as we can

  • go at my company. Everything takes two

  • days, so I'm sorry." But then you come back

  • to your team, and on the team, you say, "I'm

  • trying to delay." "Delivery"-- delivery, of

  • course, is the product is shipped, and

  • they receive it. So it's usually from the

  • seller to the buyer, and the buyer will

  • take delivery, so delivery. Now, we use

  • this often in negotiation because we're

  • often talking about shipping a product,

  • sending a product or even a service,

  • delivering a service. So this could be a

  • verb, delivering a service. But here we're

  • using it as a noun. It would be well to talk

  • about it: "When can the delivery take

  • place? when can you take delivery? when

  • would you like delivery? we need to have

  • delivery at the shortest possible time."

  • So delivery is often related to that

  • delivery time. "Emphasize"-- emphasize

  • meaning something is very important, so

  • you're going to emphasize it. And in your

  • negotiation, you can say this word right

  • out. You can say it. "I need to emphasize

  • to you. I want to emphasize to you

  • that quality is very important to our

  • customers. I will emphasize this point."

  • This is a word you can often use, and

  • it's very helpful because it lets the

  • other side see

  • what's important to you. You emphasize

  • what's importan. "Expense"-- expense is the

  • cost or the amount of money or some

  • other kind of value that you need to