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  • Mr. Speaker, will the 30s go down as the decade,

  • which witnessed the destruction

  • and downfall of the British empire?

  • That witnessed the wanton self-destruction

  • of the British empire.

  • If India were granted self-government,

  • it would mark the downfall of the British empire.

  • It would mark and consummate

  • the downfall of the British empire.

  • Mr. Inches, you're wanted!

  • On my way.

  • ? happy days are here again ?

  • ? all together, ? ? shout it now then ?

  • good morning, Inches.

  • Good morning, madam.

  • You'd better do something about miss Sarah's gramophone.

  • I don't want to start the day

  • with another family altercation.

  • No, madam.

  • Hello, mummy.

  • Good morning, darling.

  • Inches, kindly tell my daughter

  • to turn off that bloody gramophone.

  • Trashy music all over the house.

  • There you go, sir.

  • She knows I can't stand it, why does she do it?

  • Leave it to me, sir, will you?

  • Have you been drinking?

  • This time of the morning? Certainly not.

  • If you have, I hope it's your damn whiskey and not mine.

  • What time is Mrs. P coming?

  • Early afternoon, sir.

  • Early afternoon, why not this morning?

  • Because you told her not to come till after lunch, sir.

  • Pure invention, I did nothing of the sort.

  • You said you were going to town this morning, sir,

  • so, she would not be required until after lunch.

  • Well, I've changed my mind, I need to redraft this speech.

  • Yes, sir. Get her here now!

  • Thank you.

  • Mrs. Churchill?

  • Mrs. landing.

  • Good morning, madam.

  • Is something the matter? What's wrong?

  • It's Mr. monks, madam.

  • Butcher?

  • Yes, madam.

  • It seems we haven't paid his bill for several weeks.

  • And it says he'd rather not provide us with anymore meat

  • until the account's settled.

  • Inches!

  • I'll write a check

  • and you can send one of the girls to deliver it.

  • Inches, liver salts.

  • Good morning, sir.

  • Good morning.

  • Morning.

  • Randolph, you look dreadful.

  • Thank you, mama.

  • All those double brandies late last night.

  • I'm not in the same league as my beloved papa.

  • It's very bad of a young man of your age to drink so much.

  • Don't start nagging at this time of the morning, please?

  • Let me wake up first.

  • Who is it?

  • Winston, have you paid Mr. monks?

  • Have what?

  • The butcher from Westerham, have you paid his bills?

  • My dear Clemmie, I'm trying to save India from Mr. Gandhi

  • and his gang of subversive Hindus

  • to save British imperial power

  • from a disastrous eclipse, and save the Tory party

  • from an act of shame and dishonour.

  • In other words, you haven't paid the bill.

  • For God-sake, woman, I can't do everything!

  • Good morning, Mrs. P!

  • Good morning, Mary!

  • How she doing?

  • Fine, thank you.

  • You look lovely!

  • I thought he said after lunch.

  • He did, he's changed his mind.

  • I do wish he wouldn't do that.

  • I'd arranged to take the girls into Westerham to buy some shoes.

  • Heaven knows when I'll get another opportunity.

  • Mr. Churchill?

  • Ah, Mrs. P, at last!

  • Good morning.

  • We have much to do and very little time in which to do it.

  • Inches, please tell Mr. Churchill

  • I've decided to go to town with him.

  • What time will he be leaving?

  • 11:30, madam.

  • On the dot.

  • We'll revise this speech

  • and go on to the second chapter

  • on the way up to London.

  • Today?

  • Anything wrong with that?

  • No, no, of course not, Mr. Churchill.

  • And bring my notes for the battle of Blenheim.

  • There you are, Clemmie, did I keep you waiting?

  • Not more than usual.

  • Good morning, Mrs. Churchill.

  • How are you, Mrs. P?

  • Well, I think I'm fine...

  • She's as happy as a clam, aren't you, Mrs. P?

  • Don't let him boss you about, he's a dreadful bully.

  • Nonsense, Mrs. P adores me.

  • How are you getting on with "the Duke of Marlborough"?

  • Very well.

  • Volume two, chapter 20, the battle of Blenheim.

  • We're already on page 800-something.

  • I think the publishers hoped for something a little shorter.

  • Bugger the publishers, this is more than a biography.

  • It's a panegyric.

  • A tribute to my great and illustrious ancestor.

  • Get a move on, Jenner, overtake, overtake!

  • Remember when Randolph and I went off

  • to see the battlefield?

  • Of course.

  • Well, I dreamt about it last night.

  • I could see everything.

  • The enemy being routed,

  • Europe saved from those ravaging hordes,

  • and there was Marlborough,

  • riding into history.

  • Our eyes met.

  • I think he smiled at me.

  • You shouldn't have had so much cheese.

  • Stilton always gives you nightmares.

  • Mr. Speaker,

  • the loss of India

  • would mark and consummate the downfall

  • of the British empire.

  • If we cannot do our duty in India,

  • we shall have shown ourselves unworthy

  • to preserve the vast empire

  • which still centres upon this small island.

  • It is alarming

  • and also nauseating to see Mr. Gandhi,

  • a seditious middle temple lawyer,

  • now posing as a fakir of a type well known in the east,

  • striding half naked up the steps of the viceregal palace

  • to parley on equal terms

  • with the representative of the king emperor.

  • Councils, private members, bills, second reading.

  • What a monstrous speech.

  • You're his friend, bracken.

  • You should tell Winston to stop making

  • it's pathetic.

  • Britain is losing her grip on its imperial affairs.

  • He's trying to stop the rot.

  • Rubbish.

  • Winston's a self-serving opportunist.

  • That's why nobody trusts him, no sense of loyalty.

  • Thanks, tom.

  • Does this party count for nothing?

  • Is it disloyal to defend something

  • one believes in passionately?

  • He's attacking government policy,

  • which means he's attacking his own damn party.

  • It's about time he toed the line

  • and stopped being such a bloody nuisance.

  • It's the wrong hat, tom.

  • Mr. woods, this is appalling.

  • You must remember

  • that your husband lost a very substantial sum

  • as a result of the wall street crash.

  • We're bankrupt.

  • Not exactly.

  • But I have made it clear to your husband

  • that economies are necessary.

  • What did he say?

  • He promised to cut down

  • to three bottles of champagne in the evening.

  • There was a time

  • when people used to rush into the chamber

  • to hear me speak.

  • "It's Winston," they'd cry.