Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • Hey there!

    お待たせしました。

  • Welcome to Life Noggin!

    ライフノギンへようこそ

  • Hearts!

    ハーツ!

  • Hearts everywhere!

    どこにでもあるハート!

  • Wow!

    うわー!

  • You know what's really cool about you humans?

    お前ら人間のどこがカッコいいのか知ってるか?

  • No matter how wacky the world gets, you still somehow find the time to form these wonderful connections with one another.

    どんなに世界がおかしくなっても、あなたはどうにかして時間を見つけて、お互いに素晴らしいつながりを形成しています。

  • Sometimes it's with family, other times with friends, but every so often people find themselves having a super special connection with someone else, leading to a romantic relationship!

    時には家族や友人と一緒にいることもありますが、人は自分自身が誰かと特別なつながりを持っていることに気づくことが多く、それが恋愛関係につながることもあるのです。

  • These types of relationships tend to be monogamous, at least in one form or another.

    これらのタイプの関係は、少なくとも1つの形式または別の形で、一夫一婦制になる傾向があります。

  • Monogamy is all about only pairing up with one other person, and it's mainly broken down into two forms.

    一夫一婦制とは、一人の相手とだけペアを組むことであり、主に2つの形に分かれます。

  • You can have social monogamy, which pretty much means you live together but might still have romantic flings, or sexual monogamy, where you only mate with your partner.

    社会的な一夫一婦制を持つことができますが、これはかなり一緒に住んでいるが、まだロマンチックな浮気、または性的な一夫一婦制は、あなたのパートナーとだけチームメイトを持っている可能性がありますことを意味します。

  • Either way, monogamy is actually pretty rare among mammals.

    いずれにせよ、一夫一婦制は実は哺乳類の中ではかなり珍しい。

  • That's because out of all the species of mammals out there, only about 3 percent of them are known to practice some sort of monogamy.

    哺乳類の中で、一夫一婦制を実践しているのは、わずか3%程度だからです。

  • My favorites are wolves and beavers.

    好きなのはオオカミとビーバー。

  • Aww, they're just so darn cute together!

    あーあ、一緒にいるとめちゃくちゃ可愛いですねー。

  • Couple of the year in my opinion!

    私の中では今年のカップル!

  • Now, beyond just being downright adorable, there are actually quite a few potential benefits of being in a long-term, monogamous type of relationship for you humans!

    さて、ちょうど直立愛らしいことを超えて、実際にあなたの人間のための関係の長期的な、一夫一婦制のタイプであることのかなりの数の潜在的な利点があります!

  • For one, people in healthy relationshipswhether it's long term or nottypically have lower rates of harmful stress, which can contribute to a whole bunch of problems.

    一つには、健康的な関係にある人々は、それが長期的であるかどうかにかかわらず、一般的に有害なストレスの割合が低く、それは全体の問題の束に貢献することができます。

  • Beyond that, it's generally thought that longer-term relationships are good for your mental health by helping you combat depressionassuming it's a healthy, non-toxic pairing of course.

    それ以上に、一般的には、長期的な関係は、あなたがうつ病と戦うのを助けることによって、あなたの精神的な健康に良いと考えられています-もちろん、それが健康的で毒性のないペアであることを前提としています。

  • A recent study that just came out last year has added a bit of fuel to these claims.

    昨年出てきたばかりの最近の研究では、これらの主張に少しだけ燃料を追加しています。

  • After looking at the interviews of 3,617 US adults between the ages of 24 to 89, researchers found that coupled-up people had relatively fewer symptoms of depression, but only in some economic scenarios.

    24歳から89歳までの米国の成人3,617人のインタビューを調べた結果、研究者たちは、カップルになった人たちはうつ病の症状が比較的少ないことを発見したが、それは一部の経済的なシナリオにおいてのみであった。

  • Married people with a total household income of less than $60,000 per year had fewer symptoms of depression than unmarried people with comparable earnings.

    世帯収入の合計が年間6万ドル未満の既婚者は、同程度の収入の未婚者に比べてうつ病の症状が少なかった。

  • These effects seemed to be related to an increased sense of financial security and self-efficacy in the married folk.

    これらの効果は、既婚者の経済的安心感や自己効力感の増大と関連しているようである。

  • That said, couples with higher incomes didn't seem to get the same mental benefits.

    つまり、高収入の夫婦は同じように精神的な恩恵を受けられていないようでした。

  • Long term relationships may also be better for your physical health too!

    長く付き合った方が身体の健康にも良いかも!?

  • More specifically, it could be good for your heart.

    具体的には、心臓に良いかもしれません。

  • No, I'm not talking about the lovey dovey waymarriage might actually help you stay alive in the event of a heart attack.

    いいえ、私はイチャイチャした方法で話をしているのではありません - 結婚は実際にあなたが心臓発作が発生した場合に生き続けるのに役立つかもしれません。

  • A study done a couple of years ago on over 25,000 people who had had a diagnosed heart attack found that those who were married were around 14% more likely to survive than single people.

    心臓発作と診断された25,000人以上の人々に数年前に行われた研究では、結婚していた人は独身の人よりも生き残る可能性が約14%高いことがわかりました。

  • On average, the people that had gotten hitched also spent about two less days in hospital.

    平均して、結婚した人たちは入院日数も2日ほど少なくなっていました。

  • Adding all this up, it surely seems like there are a bunch of real benefits to having a lifelong partner!

    これを全部足すと、確かに生涯のパートナーを持つことの本当のメリットがたくさんあるように思えます。

  • But hey, don't fret if you're not in a romantic relationship right now, or even if you never want to be in one. You don't have to choose the monogamous realm.

    でもね、今は恋愛をしていなくても、一度も恋愛をしたくなくても、気にしないでください。一夫一婦制の道を選ぶ必要はありません。

  • While a lot of this was talking about the romantic kind of relationships, you can still have strong, positive relationships with other people too.

    この多くが恋愛のような関係の話をしていた間、あなたはまだ他の人とも強く、肯定的な関係を持つことができます。

  • Friends, familyreally anyone that you care about and that cares about you back!

    友達、家族...あなたが大切にしている人、あなたを大切にしてくれる人は、本当に誰でも戻ってきてくれます

  • So, where do you land on all of these?

    で、どこに着地するの?

  • Do you think two people should be together forever?

    二人はいつまでも一緒にいるべきだと思いますか?

  • Lemme know in the comment section below, or tell me what should I talk about next?

    下のコメント欄で教えてくれないか、次は何を話せばいいのか教えてくれないか?

  • Curious to know why breakups hurt so much?

    別れ話がなぜそんなに痛いのか知りたいですか?

  • Check out this video.

    この動画をチェックしてみてください。

  • Each person had experienced an unwanted romantic breakup within the 6 months prior to the study, and while hooked up to and fMRI, were made to look at a photo of their ex to try and gauge the pain that it put them through.

    それぞれの人は、研究の前に6ヶ月以内に望まない恋の別れを経験しており、fMRIに接続している間、元彼の写真を見て、それが彼らに与えた痛みを測定しようとしました。

  • As always, my name is Blocko, this has been Life Noggin, don't forget to keep on thinking.

    いつものように、私の名前はブロッコです、これはライフノギンになっています、考え続けることを忘れないでください。

Hey there!

お待たせしました。

字幕と単語
自動翻訳

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B1 中級 日本語 恋愛 関係 うつ病 収入 健康 心臓

あなたは本当に永遠に関係であるべきですか?

  • 27207 899
    Jiawei Liu に公開 2019 年 02 月 22 日
動画の中の単語