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  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

  • SASCHA PRUETER: Hey, everyone.

  • Wow.

  • [APPLAUSE]

  • Didn't do anything.

  • Already got applause.

  • It's a pretty good start.

  • AUDIENCE: [INAUDIBLE]

  • SASCHA PRUETER: [LAUGHS] I see a lot of familiar faces.

  • But the stage is getting bigger every year.

  • So hey, my name is Sascha Prueter.

  • I'm on the product team for Android TV.

  • BENJAMIN BAXTER: I'm Benjamin Baxter, DevRel for Android TV.

  • SASCHA PRUETER: And thanks for joining the Android TV

  • session at Google I/O. The session is called What's New,

  • but we're also talking a little bit what

  • has happened in the last year.

  • So thanks for joining.

  • And yeah, let's get going.

  • So last time most of us talked was last year at Google I/O.

  • And the Android TV ecosystem since then

  • has grown significantly.

  • And we are, obviously, really happy about that.

  • So we have now more than 100 partners

  • working with us on Android TV devices.

  • And as you can see, we are doubling that, so far,

  • every year.

  • And as you can see, the growth comes

  • from a number of devices and device categories.

  • We have-- maybe you heard at CES earlier this year--

  • a bunch of new partners in very different smart TV price

  • categories launching Android TV devices.

  • So we are in the very lucky position

  • that we can't even list all partners on one slide anymore.

  • So if you're here, if you're working

  • with us on Android TV devices and your logo is not here,

  • sorry.

  • We are running out of space.

  • But also in the set-top box space,

  • and specifically when it comes to pay TV operators,

  • we see significant growth.

  • And we're very happy about that.

  • So we already have, I think, around 30 partners worldwide--

  • so pay TV operators, cable, satellite, IPTV, shipping boxes

  • with Android TV.

  • And we have more than 50 additional ones coming.

  • So we are really happy.

  • And we see good growth there.

  • But it's not only about hardware,

  • it's also about software.

  • And that's why I'm really happy that the TV app ecosystem is

  • growing significantly as well.

  • And I think this is the fifth time I said significantly,

  • so I will stop doing that.

  • But all of you are contributing to apps.

  • Having developers here at I/O over the last few years

  • actually pick up Android TV and build cool media experiences,

  • games or completely new stuff we didn't think about,

  • is really awesome.

  • When we started the TV Play Store,

  • I think, in 2014, we had 25 apps or so.

  • Now we are approaching 4,000.

  • And the thing, because there are a lot of app developers here,

  • we wanted to mention, because it's

  • a little bit under the radar, we have also

  • launched DCB on Android TV.

  • A lot of you, if you're developing for mobile,

  • you know direct carrier billing already on mobile.

  • So if someone buys an app, if someone does an in-app purchase

  • or buys a cool new car in a game,

  • you can charge it to your mobile bill in a lot of cases,

  • if you don't have a credit card or you don't

  • want to use the credit card.

  • And the same concept has launched also since last Google

  • I/O on Android TV.

  • And we're working with more and more partners, pay TV operator

  • partners, that you can do charges from the Play Store

  • or the Play ecosystem in general to your cable,

  • or satellite, or TV subscription bill.

  • But then also, one of the things we

  • have started putting more emphasis on

  • is the Google Assistant.

  • You heard us briefly talking last year

  • at Google I/O about this.

  • And since then, the ecosystem and the services

  • that the Google Assistant brings to Android TV have--

  • not only to Android TV, but to devices in general--

  • has grown.

  • So we see a lot of use of the Assistant on TV.

  • We think it's a great additional tool

  • to make use and consumption of media services and apps

  • a lot easier on TV by just interacting with voice--

  • discovering content by simply talking to your TV,

  • having a very natural interface, not having to remember,

  • what was that search phrase again?

  • Just natural.

  • And it's easy, and it works.

  • But it's not only about finding content,

  • it's also about looking up answers to questions

  • you might be interested in.

  • It might be who that actor is.

  • Or it's also control of other devices in your house.

  • The Assistant on Android TV gives you all of that.

  • And so because we think it is so important,

  • we are this year putting a lot of priority

  • on getting the Assistant into more countries.

  • We want to make sure we do it right,

  • so we don't want to rush anything.

  • But since we have launched in the US in late 2017,

  • we are [? bringing ?] this year, as you can see,

  • a lot more countries into the Assistant

  • ecosystem on Android TV.

  • But even if you are in a country or a language that is not yet

  • Assistant enabled and you have to wait a little bit,

  • we refresh our voice search experience

  • even in those countries.

  • So I mentioned earlier that we are

  • really happy about all the apps and more and more apps

  • in the Play Store.

  • And we, last year here at Google I/O,

  • gave you a little bit of a sneak peek of the new Android TV home

  • experience, and the system UI, and how

  • apps can integrate with that.

  • Back then, it was a sneak peek.

  • It was a preview.

  • It has launched with Android Oreo.

  • And we now have a lot of partners starting to roll this

  • out to Android TV devices.

  • So we thought it's a good opportunity

  • to go into more detail how your apps can actually

  • take advantage of this content first experience

  • that we are trying to achieve with Android TV.

  • And Ben is going to talk a little bit

  • about what it actually means to have a content first app.

  • BENJAMIN BAXTER: Thanks, Sascha.

  • So we really wanted to redefine this experience,

  • wanted to be very content first, content-driven.

  • If you're familiar with the previous screen,

  • we have one row for recommendations, a double row

  • for apps, double row for games.

  • We've changed that, as you can clearly see.

  • So apps are still important.

  • We have one row for apps.

  • It's just your favorite apps.

  • Your users can customize and add your app to this row.

  • It's up to the user's discretion.

  • That recommendation row from Android N and below,

  • we've broken it up into several different responsibilities.

  • So we have a Play Next row where you can add content.

  • And we'll talk more about this later,

  • but you can add content to be picked back and engaged

  • with the user later.

  • The next thing we did was we broke out--

  • and each app can have their own channel.

  • They can have their own surface on the home screen.

  • We're trying to really push this content first design.

  • And every app can contribute to it.

  • As Sascha mentioned earlier with the Assistant,

  • the Assistant is also on the home screen.

  • It's not specific to Android O or Android P.

  • It's actually supported from Android M and above.

  • So this is here to enhance search and keep pushing

  • that content first design.

  • OK.

  • I keep saying content first.

  • It's like my favorite phrase all of a sudden.

  • But let's look at some really good examples

  • before we dive into the technical details about what

  • builds a content first design.

  • So here, we have Google Play Movies.

  • And this is from the home screen.

  • And you can see everything about their details.

  • It's as if the movie detail screen

  • is right there on the home screen to help build and engage

  • an experience.

  • This is great for users.

  • They don't have to go into the app and hop back out.

  • They can make decisions right there from the home screen.

  • If we take it a step further, we have video previews.

  • So if you have a movie, a trailer

  • makes a great video preview.

  • If you're an audio app, 10-second clip

  • is a great audio preview.

  • We've found that having previews is

  • very engaging for users and drives engagement

  • into your app.

  • I said earlier about the Play Next row.

  • This is a great place for you to add

  • content to bring users back in.

  • If you're watching a really long movie,

  • you add a little bit extra metadata,

  • we'll make a beautiful progress indicator to add more context.

  • And the users are able to hop back into the app.

  • And I said channels.

  • You're not just limited to one little row in the home screen,

  • you can have as many channels as you want.

  • If we look here, we have channels like Featured,

  • Top Free.

  • These are great channels that you know are going to be fresh.

  • These have indications of being updated daily, even hourly.

  • OK.

  • So now that we have a nice context about what's

  • on the home screen, let's dive into how you guys can

  • build this experience.

  • So what is a channel?

  • A channel is just a logo and a name.

  • That's all it is.

  • It's a container for programs.

  • This is going to be where you theme

  • your content and customize everything deeper

  • in the programs.

  • To build a channel, we have a support library.

  • It just uses the builder pattern.

  • Super easy, super convenient for you.

  • Everything on the home screen should be clickable.

  • So if you click on a logo, it should open back into your app.

  • So just set the App Link URI, and this

  • will let you open up your app from the home screen.

  • The next thing that's important is the internal provider ID.

  • This is an ID for your app to tell the home screen, hey, keep

  • track of this.

  • I know what this ID is.

  • And when I go to query my channel later,

  • I can synchronize my channel with what the home screen knows

  • about my app.

  • And that's it.

  • It uses a content provider.

  • And we have convenient methods.

  • For those of you that know the joys of content providers,

  • you know that there can be boilerplate code.

  • We've abstracted all of that into the support library.

  • And we make it really easy for you to build a content provider

  • API.

  • Those also familiar with content providers

  • know that URIs are kind of tedious and cumbersome

  • to manage.

  • The support library manages all of that for you.

  • It's just a simple insert statement,

  • and you get back a channel ID.

  • Like I said earlier with internal provider ID,

  • you can use the channel ID and the internal provider

  • ID to make sure, when you synchronize

  • and update your channels later, you'll

  • have all the keys you need.

  • OK, channels, like I said, they're just a shell of a row.

  • The programs are what really matter.

  • So let's look at an example of a program.

  • In this program, we have a bunch of stuff happening.

  • We have a thumbnail image.

  • We have a title, a description.

  • And anything else you know about this program

  • can be added to the home screen.

  • The more metadata you add, the richer the experience,

  • the better the user engagement.

  • So anything that's in your Details page,