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  • >> APRIL NEILSON: Fundamental analytical skills.

  • Today our presenters are Tess Escoto from the Employment Development Department.

  • Tess Escoto began her career with the Employment Development Department

  • after working in Human Resources in the private sector.

  • Tess's professional career began in training, as she developed a tutoring center for adults in Los Angeles, California.

  • This progressed her involvement and training and developing curriculum at every company she has worked.

  • Today she serves as a training officer for EDD University.

  • An experienced motivational speaker and singer, she has spoken and performed both regionally and nationally.

  • Tess has a Bachelor of Arts in English Literature,

  • with a minor in Human Resources from the California State University Los Angeles.

  • Our second presenter today is Lana Fletcher from the California State Secretary of State.

  • Lana Fletcher's profession career spans 20 years in project and executive management,

  • in both the private and public sector.

  • Her expertise covers a wide variety of areas, including the banking industry and interior design.

  • Lana believes in exceptional customer service as the basis for a successful professional career.

  • Her journey with the State of California began as a supervising technician.

  • She now holds the position of training officer with the secretary of state training teams,

  • and bringing a breadth of knowledge from her diverse professional background.

  • With that, I'd like to turn it over

  • and begin today's webinar by turning it over to Miss Lana Fletcher.

  • LANA FLETCHER: Thank you very much, April.

  • Good morning.

  • Today's class is Fundamental Analytical Skills.

  • Thank you for inviting us here today.

  • My name is Lana Fletcher, and my co-presenter today will be Tess Escoto-Arcio,

  • and we are looking forward to a productive class.

  • We will have April Neilson reading our polls.

  • Before we get started, please be sure to download the toolkit,

  • as I will be referring to this throughout the presentation.

  • Before we get started we'd like to do a quick poll for the audience.

  • April.

  • >> APRIL NEILSON: Thanks, Lana.

  • Okay, before we get started, we want to really gauge our audience

  • and get a little information about all of you attending today's webinar.

  • We have 818 people joining us today from across the state, so I think that's absolutely fabulous.

  • So let's go ahead and find out who do we have today.

  • So I've just opened up poll number one, so let's see how it rolls out here.

  • Oh, the alternate key strokes for answering the poll,

  • press control tab repeatedly just until the speaker icon is not selected anymore.

  • Then use the tab key to select the answer.

  • Okay, great.

  • It looks like we're getting a lot of great responses.

  • We have 46% of you are stating that you are currently an analyst;

  • 25% are not an analyst but are on the list and looking to become an analyst;

  • 4% are currently the supervisor of an analyst; and 23 are none of the above.

  • So we have a pretty mixed audience here, Lana, so back to you.

  • >> LANA FLETCHER: Thank you very much, April.

  • Okay, we're going to wait a moment so we can all get on the same slide.

  • There we go, next slide, please.

  • There we go.

  • Our purpose today is to learn more about the role of the analyst within state service.

  • We're going to go ahead and discuss the critical competencies of successful analysts.

  • I'll review critical thinking and problem-solving skills, and we'll provide tools

  • and resources to set an analyst on a path for success.

  • Let's go ahead and take another poll.

  • I'll turn over to you, April.

  • >> APRIL NEILSON: Okay, great.

  • Thanks, Lana.

  • So what we want to find out from our audience today is which objective is the most important to you today.

  • If you are using a keyboard instead of a mouse,

  • press control tab repeatedly just until the speaker icon is not selected anymore,

  • then use the tab key to select the answer.

  • Great, we're getting a lot of feedback.

  • Thank you for all of you who have answered the poll.

  • It looks pretty split across the board, with maybe reviewing the core critical thinking

  • and problem-solving skills being the number one right now for our audience.

  • Lana, back to you.

  • >> LANA FLETCHER: Thank you, April.

  • All right, so we will be reviewing those core critical thinking and problem-solving skills, but before we do that,

  • let's just briefly go over the toolkit that you have downloaded so that everyone is familiar with the pages that we'll

  • be discussing throughout.

  • We do have an action plan; that will be your first one.

  • The next page is a communications strategy,

  • how you will actually be able to format items so that you are communicating effectively.

  • Then we have a time analysis for you.

  • We've also included setting direction and pace, and then a problem-solving matrix.

  • So we just wanted to make sure that you were familiar with these because we will be pulling these up as we speak.

  • Now I'm going to turn it over to my partner, Tess, and she will be talking to you about the roles of an analyst.

  • >> TESS ESCOTO: Good morning everyone.

  • You know, I'm an analyst as well for the State of California.

  • And, you know, I've always been intrigued by new subjects.

  • I've always been excited by the prospects of training.

  • And if that's you, then you're in the right place this morning to learn a little bit about your role as an analyst.

  • Working as an analyst, it's a great classification to gain a breadth of knowledge of state government.

  • There are so many areas that an analyst can work in, many opportunities to learn new things.

  • I remember when I started out in EDD someone was kind enough to give me a career ladder,

  • a little handbook that we hand out.

  • And that was where I really understood that there are many type of analysts in state service.

  • You know, I identified my strengths.

  • I wanted to search for that position that I could really utilize those, and that's why we're here this morning.

  • According to the CalHR website,

  • an analyst helps support the decisions made by the state government by providing clear, thorough,

  • and objective information.

  • You know, preparing to become an analyst, it means that you continuously want to learn new subjects.

  • You want to continually demonstrate your willingness to take on progressively more complicated

  • and even complex problems, because training doesn't just occur in the classroom.

  • Wouldn't you agree?

  • It can include cross training.

  • It includes on-the-job training.

  • It includes those assignments that, you know, maybe some people would hesitate to take, and you want to take them.

  • It includes rotation training, staff meetings, even online training, of course, like you're doing this morning,

  • workshops, seminar, conferences, self-directed study, and reviewing written guidelines.

  • So I would encourage you this morning to stay motivated if you are an analyst.

  • And if you are thinking of taking on that role, stay motivated as well.

  • You may face barriers on your path to becoming an analyst, and the everyday demands of the job, yeah,

  • they can take away some energy and they take away time as well, if you let them.

  • You may not get rewarded immediately for taking time to work on your development plan.

  • But remember that your long-term success depends on your professional development,

  • and so does your value to the organization, so don't let barriers prevent you from achieving your goals.

  • Remember, and this is so true, no one else will take as strong an interest in your development as you.

  • So as we have looked at these roles that you see on screen, look at those, see what interests you, and we'll continue.

  • Analysts do perform a variety of functions, and they hold many titles.

  • You can see some examples of analytical work here.

  • You know, you're a troubleshooter.

  • You can analyze data from a project or experiment.

  • All of these items that you see bulleted here involve dealing with problems or opportunities, even staff shortages.

  • You may be asked to take a project, where due to a change in legislation,

  • maybe you need to review the current procedures and possibly write new ones.

  • Maybe you have to justify more staffing, and then train the staff on that new procedure.

  • Or you may have to facilitate meetings throughout the process.

  • Let's go over, briefly, some of the job duties under the specific analytical classifications.

  • Some of you may be an associate budget analyst or maybe you've heard.

  • It's just one of the three examples of analysts that I want to review today.

  • Like I already mentioned, there are many different types analyst positions in state service,

  • and it's up to you to find the position that most interests you.

  • So you can see that the associate budget analyst covers everything that has to do with the budget.

  • If you want, take a pen and jot down words or phrases as I go through these next slides that interest you.

  • You can use this time right now to determine your strengths and your areas of interest.

  • So take a second or two and look at this, and we'll go on to the next slide.

  • As the title suggests, the associated budget analyst covers a gamut of budgetary assignments,

  • from information gathering to funding recommendations, and more analyzing, reviewing estimates, and even contracts.

  • So let's continue.

  • Again, maybe as an analyst, an associate personnel analyst we're looking at here,

  • maybe you're asked to consider things that range from technical questions to hypothetical questions,

  • even ethical questions, case studies.

  • You're looking at gathering data, you're looking at presenting data, even pay.

  • You're looking at class specifications.

  • So, again, make note of items here that interest you as we continue to look at the associate personnel analyst.

  • We are looking at formal business writing, you know, including, yes, knowledge of grammar

  • and procedures that make this type of position detailed, as with other analyst positions as well.

  • Formal memorandums, reports, all of these things that beyond that demands a little bit more than spell check,

  • which I know that we all have used and fail sometimes at using that.

  • But it does demand a little bit more detail to grammar and to business writing than other positions do.

  • So let's continue.

  • The third one we're going to look at this morning is the legal analyst,

  • and this is the last type we will consider this morning as an example.

  • I want you to take a moment and read these bullets for any skills that you possess

  • or that you are interested in attaining.

  • And you can see, really, how these analytical skills connect to each other; investigation and assisting, coordinating,

  • all of those familiar words that you, too, can succeed at.

  • I know you can.

  • And finally, a legal analyst, will, as you see here, interview witnesses, conduct historical research, and as always,

  • assist in the administrative proceedings.

  • So I'm hoping you're making some notes here, because we have another poll coming up, poll number three, April.

  • >> APRIL NEILSON: Great.

  • Thanks, Tess.

  • There are so many different types of analyst classifications here within the state.

  • Thank you for sharing those three.

  • So this just shows you that no matter what your interests are or what skills you currently possess,

  • there is an analyst job that would probably be perfect for you.

  • So let's go ahead and open poll number three.

  • Which analytical area -- and let me go ahead and open this poll --

  • which analytical area is the most interesting to you?

  • So if you are using the keyboard instead of a mouse,

  • press control tab repeatedly just until the speaker icon is not selected anymore,

  • then use the tab key to select the answer.

  • So some of the areas here are budgets, human resource, procurement, training, finance, and budgets, or others.

  • There's all sorts of things, and we just barely touched upon a few of them.

  • So I'll give you another minute or so to go ahead and answer.

  • UNKNOWN SPEAKER: It's unmuting like a speaker, yeah, that's to talk.

  • >> APRIL NEILSON: Okay, great.

  • It looks like there are lots of answers.

  • If your phone is not muted, please mute your phone.

  • It looks like we have some budding analysts out there from human resources, as well as other,

  • which I'm assuming may be investigations or law, or other things that we currently talked about.

  • So we've got a lot of great skills out there that people are interested in.

  • So I'm going to go ahead and turn it back to Lana.

  • Thanks, Lana.

  • >> LANA FLETCHER: Thank you so much, April.

  • It's very interesting to see how many of you, 32%, were interested in other.

  • Maybe there's analysts in their program areas or that sort of thing.

  • So what I want to talk about now is subject matter experts.

  • Often an analyst is seen as a subject matter expert

  • or they may have to partner with what we call a "SME" in order to tackle a project.

  • It's important to understand what a subject matter expert is and to know why this individual is important.

  • So a SME is an individual who has expertise in a particular topic.

  • An analyst may be a SME or be required to work directly with a SME.

  • A SME may become an analyst because of the knowledge in their area

  • but may not have the competencies to make them an effective analyst.

  • Your job as an analyst is not to know every part of the program area but to be able to identify your resources

  • and how to identify when you need to consult with a SME.

  • For an example, you may be tasked with reviewing a production area to identify any inefficiencies in the process.

  • You may need to meet with several SMEs in each part of the process

  • to gain the knowledge needed to make a true analysis.

  • But we will be revisiting SMEs again a bit later.

  • Now let's talk about stakeholders and customers.

  • Knowing who your stakeholders and customers are

  • and what they are expecting from the project you are working on is a critical part of the analytical process.

  • Adapting your style of communication to these two groups will ensure you are more effective.

  • Stakeholders -- your managers, your supervisors, or the end users, and then your customers, internal customers

  • and external customers.

  • Sometimes customers and stakeholders are one in the same, and the end user may either be the customer

  • or the stakeholder.

  • We work in a very diverse work environment.

  • It's important to keep a high level of professionalism when communicating with both customers and stakeholders.

  • In order to successfully complete this work, analysts must demonstrate some key characteristics,

  • also known as "key competencies,"

  • which I'm going to turn over to Tess to kind of review these analytical competencies with you.

  • Tess.

  • >> TESS ESCOTO: Thank you, Lana.

  • Well this is going wonderfully so far, I think.

  • We're going to talk about analytical competencies.

  • I hope you're still with us.

  • I know you are.

  • Maybe you've had job responsibilities which cover a portion of these competencies that we're going to talk about.

  • And, you know, we've done this type of work, but when you explain to someone how do I do this type of work,

  • how do I prove that I've done this, you want to go to these amicable competencies

  • and the rest of them that we're going to talk about today.

  • You know, we do a variety of duties, depending on your agency, department, division, or team.

  • But you know what, we all share the same core competencies.

  • And CalHR defines successful analysts as someone who does the following that you see on this slide:

  • analytical thinking; they apply technologies to tasks, they communicate, they have a measure of creative thinking.

  • So when you're thinking of ways that you have used these competencies, you know,

  • I hope that you would even think of a situation and an action that you took,

  • and what happened as a result of the competencies that you used.

  • Let's continue to the next slide.

  • You can see here the rest of the competencies that are covered are thoroughness, decision making,

  • information gathering, strategic thinking.

  • So what you want to do is you want to go through these and think, you know, this project that I was given,

  • this is how I ensured that this information was complete and accurate.

  • And you want to put a name on <