Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

審査済み この字幕は審査済みです
  • Five years ago, I stood on the TED stage, and I spoke about my work.

    5年前、私はTEDのステージに立ち、自分の仕事について話したことがあります。

  • But one year later, I had a terrible accident as I left a pub one dark night with friends, in Scotland.

    しかし、その1年後、ある暗い夜に友人たちとスコットランドにあるパブを出たところで、ひどい事故に見舞われました。

  • As we followed the path through a forest, I suddenly felt a massive thud, then a second thud, and I fell to the ground.

    森の中の道を進んでいると、突然、大きな音がして、2回目の音がして、私は地面に倒れました。

  • I had no idea what had hit me.

    何が起こったのか、さっぱりわかりませんでした。

  • I later found out that when the gate was opened on a garden, a wild stag stampeded along the path and ran straight into me.

    後で知ったのですが、庭の門を開けたら、そこにいた野生の鹿が道を踏みしめて、そのまま私にぶつかってきたのだそうです。

  • Its antler penetrated my trachea and my esophagus and stopped at my spinal cord and fractured my neck.

    その角は私の気管と食道を貫通し、脊髄で止まって首を骨折しました。

  • My best friend found me lying on the floor, gurgling for help through a hole in my neck.

    親友が、床に倒れて首の穴から助けを求めてゴロゴロしている私を発見しました。

  • And we locked eyes, and although I couldn't speak, she could understand what I was thinking.

    そして目を合わせると、私はしゃべれなかったけれど、彼女は私が何を考えているのかがわかりました。

  • And she told me, "Just breathe."

    そして、彼女は私に「ただ呼吸しなさい」と言いました。

  • And so, whilst focusing on my breath, I had a strong sense of calmness, but I was certain that I was going to die.

    そして、呼吸に意識を集中させながら、強い落ち着きを感じつつも、「もう死ぬんだ」と確信しました。

  • Somehow, I was content with this, because I've always tried to do my best in life whenever I can.

    なぜか、私はこれで満足していたのです。なぜなら、私はいつも、できる限り人生でベストを尽くそうとしてきたからです。

  • So I just continued to enjoy each breath as one more moment -- one breath in and one breath out.

    だから、私はただ、一回一回の呼吸を、もう一回一回の呼吸として楽しみました。

  • An ambulance came, I was still fully conscious, and I analyzed everything on the journey, because I'm a scientist:

    救急車が来て、私はまだ完全に意識があったので、科学者である私は旅先ですべてを分析しました。

  • the sound of the tires on the road, the frequency of the street lights and eventually, the city street lights.

    道路を走るタイヤの音、街灯の周波数、そして街の街灯。

  • And I thought, "Maybe I will survive." And then I passed out.

    そして、"もしかしたら、生き残れるかもしれない "と思いました。そして気を失いました

  • I was stabilized at a local hospital and then airlifted to Glasgow, where they reconstructed my throat and put me in a coma.

    地元の病院で安定した後、グラスゴーに空輸され、そこで喉を再建し、昏睡状態になりました。

  • And while I was in the coma, I had many alternate realities. It was like a crazy mix of "Westworld" and "Black Mirror."

    そして、昏睡状態にある間、私は多くの別世界を体験しました。"ウエストワールド "と "ブラックミラー "が 混ざったような感じでした。

  • But that's a whole other story.

    しかし、それは全く別の話です。

  • My local TV station reported live from outside the hospital of a Cambridge scientist who was in a coma, and they didn't know if she would live or die or walk or talk.

    私の地元のテレビ局では、ケンブリッジ大学の科学者が昏睡状態に陥り、生きるか死ぬか、歩くか話すかもわからないという状況を、病院の外から生中継で伝えました。

  • And a week later, I woke up from that coma.

    そして1週間後、私はその昏睡状態から目覚めたのです。

  • And that was the first gift.

    そして、それが最初のプレゼントとなりました。

  • And then I had the gift to think, the gift to move, the gift to breathe and the gift to eat and to drink.

    そして、考える才能、動く才能、呼吸する才能、そして食べたり飲んだりする才能を手に入れたのです。

  • And that took three and a half months.

    そして、3ヵ月半かかりました。

  • But there was one thing that I never got back, though, and that was my privacy.

    でも、ひとつだけ取り戻せないものがありました。それは、自分のプライバシーです。

  • The tabloid press made the story about gender.

    タブロイド紙は、ジェンダーをテーマにした記事を作りました。

  • Look -- I'm transgender, it's not that big a deal.

    私はトランスジェンダーですが、それほど大きな問題ではありません。

  • Like, my hair color or my shoe size is way more interesting.

    髪の色とか、靴のサイズとかのほうがよっぽど面白いです。

  • When I last spoke here --

    前回、ここで講演したとき --。

  • When I last spoke here --

    前回、ここで講演したとき --。

  • at TED, I didn't talk about it, because it's boring.

    TED では、つまらないからということで話しませんでした。

  • And one Scottish newspaper ran with the headline: "Sex Swap Scientist Gored by Stag."

    そして、あるスコットランドの新聞は見出しを掲げました。「オスの鹿に突き刺されたおネエの科学者」

  • And five others did similar things.

    そして、他の5人も同じようなことをしていました。

  • And for a minute, I was angry, but then I found my calm place.

    そして、一瞬、腹が立ちましたが、その後、冷静な場所を見つけました。

  • And what ran through my head was, "They've crossed the wrong woman, and they're not going to know what's hit them."

    そして、私の頭の中を駆け巡ったのは、「彼らは間違った女性に逆らった。何が起こったかわからないだろう」ということでした

  • I'm a kindness ninja.

    わたしは優しい忍者です。

  • I don't really know what a ninja does, but to me, they slip through the shadows, crawl through the sewers, skip across the rooftops, and before you know it, they're behind you.

    忍者が何をするのかよくわからないけど、僕にとっては、影をすり抜け、下水道を這い、屋根を飛び越えて、いつの間にか後ろにいる感じです。

  • They don't turn up with an army or complain, and they're laser-focused on a plan.

    軍隊で現れたり、文句を言ったりせず、計画的にレーザーを当てているのです。

  • So when I lay in my hospital bed, I thought of my plan to help reduce the chances of them doing this to somebody else, by using the system as is, and paying the price of sacrificing my privacy.

    そこで、病院のベッドで横になっているとき、私は、自分のプライバシーを犠牲にする代償を払ってでも、このシステムをそのまま使い、他の誰かに同じことが起こる可能性を減らす手助けをしようと考えたのです。

  • What they told one million people, I will tell ten million people.

    彼らが100万人に伝えたことを、私は1,000万人に伝えます。

  • Because when you're angry, people defend themselves.

    なぜなら、怒ると人は自分を守るからです。

  • So I didn't attack them, and they were defenseless.

    だから、攻撃しなかったし、防衛的ではありませんでした。

  • And I wrote kind and calm letters to these newspapers.

    そして、これらの新聞社に親切で冷静な手紙を書きました。

  • And The Sun newspaper, the kind of "Fox News" of the UK, thanked me for my "reasoned approach."

    そして、イギリスの Fox News のような存在である The Sun 新聞は、私の "理にかなったアプローチ "に感謝したのです。

  • And I asked for no apology, no retraction, no money, just an acknowledgment that they broke their own rules, and what they did was just wrong.

    そして、謝罪も撤回も金銭も求めず、ただ自分たちのルールを破ったこと、自分たちのやったことが間違っていたことを認めてほしいと頼みました。

  • And on this journey, I started to learn who they are, and they began to learn who I am, and we actually became friends.

    そして、この旅の中で、私は彼らのことを知り、彼らは私のことを知り、実際に友達になったのです。

  • I've even had a few glasses of wine with Philippa from The Sun since then.

    その後、The SunのPhilippa さんとも何度かワインを飲んだりしました。

  • And after three months, they all agreed, and the statements were published on a Friday, and that was the end of that.

    そして3ヵ月後、全員が合意し、声明は金曜日に発表され、それで終わりとなりました。

  • Or so they thought.

    或いは彼らはそう思いました。

  • On the Saturday, I went on the evening news, and with the headline "Six National Newspapers Admit They Were Wrong."

    土曜日に、夕方のニュースに出ました。「全国紙6紙が間違いを認める」という見出しで。

  • And the anchor said to me, "But don't you think it's our job as journalists to sensationalize a story?"

    そして、キャスターが私に言いました。「しかし、ストーリーをセンセーショナルにするのがジャーナリストとしての仕事だと思いませんか?」と。

  • And I said, "I was laying on a forest floor, gored by a stag. Is that not sensational enough?"

    そして、「私は森の床に横たわっていて、鹿に刺されました」と言ったんです。十分センセーショナルじゃない?

  • And I was now writing the headlines.

    そして、私は今、見出しを書いているところでした。

  • My favorite one was, "The stag trampled on my throat, and the press trampled on my privacy."

    私のお気に入りは、「鹿は私の喉を踏みつけ、報道陣は私のプライバシーを踏みにじる」というものでした。

  • And it was the most read piece of BBC News online that day.

    そして、その日、BBCニュースの中で最も読まれた記事となったのです。

  • And I was kind of having fun.

    とても愉快でした。

  • And by the end of my week of media, I started to use my newfound voice and platform to spread a message of love and kindness.

    そして、1週間のメディア活動の終わりには、新たに得た自分の声とプラットフォームを使って、愛と優しさのメッセージを広げるようになったのです。

  • And when I had the minute of anger and hatred towards those press and journalists, I had to identify my inner bigotry towards them.

    そして、それらのプレスやジャーナリストに対する怒りや憎しみの分際で、彼らに対する自分の内なる偏見を確認する必要があったのです。

  • And I had to meet and speak with these people without judgment.

    そして、その人たちと判断せずに会って話をしなければなリませんでした。

  • And I had to let myself understand them, and in return, they began to understand me.

    そして、自分が彼らを理解することで、彼らも私を理解してくれるようになったのです。

  • Well, six months later, they asked me to join the committee that regulates the press.

    その半年後、報道を規制する委員会に参加するように言われたんです。

  • And a few times a year, I sip tea and dip biscuits with the likes of Daily Mail editor Paul Dacre, who says to me,

    そして、年に数回、Daily Mail の編集長 Paul Dacre 氏などとお茶を飲んだり、ビスケットを食べたりしています。

  • "So, Kate, how have your last few months been?"

    「それでケイト、この数ヶ月はどうだった?」

  • And I respect them.

    そして、彼らを尊敬しています。

  • And I'm now one of three members of the public who has a seat at the table -- not because I'm different, but because my voice counts, just like anybody else.

    そして私は今、テーブルに座ることのできる3人の一般人のうちの1人です。他の人と違うからではなく、他の人と同じように私の声が重要なのです。

  • And the irony is, every now and again, I'm asked to visit those printing presses of this declining industry,

    そして皮肉なことに、私は時々、この衰退産業の印刷所を訪問するよう依頼されるのです。

  • because some people think that the technology I spoke about here, last time at TED, my interactive print, might actually help save them.

    というのも、前回 TED でお話しした、私のインタラクティブプリントという技術が、実際に自分を救ってくれるかもしれないと考える人がいるのです。

  • So beware of your inner bigot, and make friends from your enemies.

    だから、自分の中の偏屈者に気をつけ、敵から友人を作ってください。

  • Thank you.

    ありがとうございました。

Five years ago, I stood on the TED stage, and I spoke about my work.

5年前、私はTEDのステージに立ち、自分の仕事について話したことがあります。

字幕と単語
審査済み この字幕は審査済みです

ワンタップで英和辞典検索 単語をクリックすると、意味が表示されます

B1 中級 日本語 TED 新聞 忍者 ジェンダー 記者 記事

【TED】マスコミにプライバシーを踏みにじられた!

  • 3753 145
    林宜悉 に公開 2022 年 09 月 09 日
動画の中の単語