Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

AI 自動生成字幕
  • Simone George: I met Mark when he was just blind.

    シモーネ・ジョージ:マークと出会ったのは、彼が目が見えなくなったばかりの頃でした。

  • I had returned home to live in Dublin

    ダブリンに住むために帰国していた

  • after the odyssey that was my 20s,

    20代の頃のオデッセイを経て

  • educating my interest in human rights and equality in university,

    大学での人権・平等への関心を教育する

  • traveling the world, like my nomad grandmother.

    ノマドの祖母のように世界を旅する

  • And during a two-year stint working in Madrid,

    そしてマドリッドで2年間働いていた間に

  • dancing many nights till morning in salsa clubs.

    サルサクラブで朝まで何度も踊っています。

  • When I met Mark, he asked me to teach him to dance.

    マークに会った時、彼にダンスを教えて欲しいと言われました。

  • And I did.

    そして、私はそうしました。

  • They were wonderful times, long nights talking,

    彼らは素晴らしい時間を過ごし、長い夜に話していました。

  • becoming friends and eventually falling for each other.

    友達になって、最終的にはお互いに好きになってしまう。

  • Mark had lost his sight when he was 22,

    マークは22歳の時に失明していた。

  • and the man that I met eight years later was rebuilding his identity,

    そして8年後に出会った男は、自分のアイデンティティを再構築していた。

  • the cornerstone of which was this incredible spirit

    礎となったのは

  • that had taken him to the Gobi Desert, where he ran six marathons in seven days.

    ゴビ砂漠で7日間で6つのマラソンを走りました

  • And to marathons at the North Pole, and from Everest Base Camp.

    北極点でのマラソンやエベレストベースキャンプからのマラソンにも。

  • When I asked him what had led to this high-octane life,

    何がきっかけでこのハイオクな生活になったのかを聞いてみると

  • he quoted Nietzsche:

    彼はニーチェを引用した。

  • "He, who has a Why to live, can bear with almost any How."

    "生きる理由がある者は どんな方法にも耐えられる"

  • He had come across the quote in a really beautiful book

    彼は本当に美しい本の中の引用に出くわしていました。

  • called "Man's Search for Meaning," by Viktor Frankl,

    と呼ばれるビクトール・フランクルの「意味のための人間の検索」。

  • a neurologist and psychiatrist

    精神科医

  • who survived years in a Nazi concentration camp.

    ナチスの強制収容所で何年も生き残った人たち。

  • Frankl used this Nietzsche quote to explain to us

    フランクルはこのニーチェの名言を使って、私たちに説明してくれました。

  • that when we can no longer change our circumstances,

    状況を変えられなくなった時に

  • we are challenged to change ourselves.

    私たちは自分自身を変えることに挑戦しています。

  • Mark Pollock: Eventually, I did rebuild my identity,

    マーク・ポロック結局、私は自分のアイデンティティを再構築した。

  • and the Why for me was about competing again,

    そして、私にとっての「なぜ」は、再び競い合うことでした。

  • because pursuing success and risking failure

    成功を追い求めて失敗するから

  • was simply how I felt normal.

    は単純に私が普通に感じていた方法でした。

  • And I finished the rebuild

    そして、私は再構築を終えました。

  • on the 10th anniversary of losing my sight.

    失明して10年目の記念日に

  • I took part in a 43-day expedition race

    43日間の遠征レースに参加しました

  • in the coldest, most remote, most challenging place on earth.

    地球上で最も寒く、最も人里離れた、最も困難な場所で。

  • It was the first race to the South Pole

    南極点への最初のレースだった

  • since Shackleton, Scott and Amundsen set foot in Antarctica, 100 years before.

    シャクルトン、スコット、アムンゼンが南極に足を踏み入れたのは100年前のことです。

  • And putting the demons of blindness behind me

    盲目の悪魔を私の後ろに置いて

  • with every step towards the pole,

    ポールに向かって一歩一歩を踏み出すごとに

  • it offered me a long-lasting sense of contentment.

    それは私に長く続く満足感を与えてくれました。

  • As it turned out, I would need that in reserve,

    それが判明したので、私はそれを予備に必要としています。

  • because one year after my return,

    なぜなら、私が帰ってきてから1年後に

  • in, arguably, the safest place on earth,

    地球上で最も安全な場所です

  • a bedroom at a friend's house,

    友人の家の寝室。

  • I fell from a third-story window onto the concrete below.

    3階の窓から下のコンクリートに落ちた。

  • I don't know how it happened.

    どうしてそうなったのかはわからない。

  • I think I must have got up to go to the bathroom.

    トイレに行くために立ち上がったに違いないと思います。

  • And because I'm blind, I used to run my hand along the wall

    私は目が見えないので、よく壁に沿って手を走らせていました。

  • to find my way.

    自分の道を見つけるために

  • That night, my hand found an open space where the closed window should have been.

    その夜、私の手は閉じられた窓があるはずの空き地を見つけた。

  • And I cartwheeled out.

    そして、私は外に転がり出た。

  • My friends who found me thought I was dead.

    私を見つけた友人は、私が死んだと思っていました。

  • When I got to hospital, the doctors thought I was going to die,

    病院に着いた時、医者は私が死ぬと思っていました。

  • and when I realized what was happening to me,

    と気がついた時には

  • I thought that dying might have been ...

    死にたいと思っていたのですが

  • might have been the best outcome.

    が最良の結果だったかもしれません。

  • And lying in intensive care,

    そして集中治療室に横たわっている。

  • facing the prospect of being blind and paralyzed,

    目が見えなくなり、麻痺していることに直面しています。

  • high on morphine, I was trying to make sense of what was going on.

    モルヒネを服用していたので 何が起こっているのか理解しようとしていました。

  • And one night, lying flat on my back,

    そしてある夜、仰向けに寝そべっていた。

  • I felt for my phone to write a blog,

    ブログを書くためにスマホのために感じたこと。

  • trying to explain how I should respond.

    どのように対応すべきかを説明しようとしています。

  • It was called "Optimist, Realist or Something Else?"

    "楽観主義者、現実主義者、あるいは何か他のもの "と呼ばれていました。

  • and it drew on the experiences of Admiral Stockdale,

    それはストックデール提督の経験に基づいています。

  • who was a POW in the Vietnam war.

    ベトナム戦争で捕虜となった

  • He was incarcerated, tortured, for over seven years.

    7年以上も投獄され、拷問を受けていた。

  • His circumstances were bleak, but he survived.

    彼の状況は荒涼としていたが、彼は生き残った。

  • The ones who didn't survive were the optimists.

    生き残れなかったのは、楽観主義者たちだった。

  • They said, "We'll be out by Christmas,"

    "クリスマスまでには出るだろう "と言っていました。

  • and Christmas would come and Christmas would go,

    とクリスマスが来て、クリスマスが去っていきました。

  • and then it would be Christmas again,

    と言って、またクリスマスになってしまいます。

  • and when they didn't get out, they became disappointed, demoralized

    抜け出せなかった時には失望して意気消沈していた

  • and many of them died in their cells.

    と、多くの人が房の中で死んでいきました。

  • Stockdale was a realist.

    ストックデールは 現実主義者だった

  • He was inspired by the stoic philosophers,

    彼はストイックな哲学者に影響を受けていた。

  • and he confronted the brutal facts of his circumstances

    と、自分の置かれている状況の残酷な事実に直面した。

  • while maintaining a faith that he would prevail in the end.

    彼は最後には勝つだろうという信念を持ち続けています。

  • And in that blog, I was trying to apply his thinking as a realist

    そして、そのブログでは、彼の考え方をリアリストとして応用して

  • to my increasingly bleak circumstances.

    ますます荒涼とした私の状況に

  • During the many months of heart infections and kidney infections

    心臓の感染症や腎臓の感染症が何ヶ月も続いている間に

  • after my fall, at the very edge of survival,

    私が倒れた後、生き延びるギリギリのところで

  • Simone and I faced the fundamental question:

    シモーネと私は根本的な問題に直面した。

  • How do you resolve the tension between acceptance and hope?

    受け入れと希望の緊張感をどのように解消するのか?

  • And it's that that we want to explore with you now.

    そして、それを今、あなたと一緒に探っていきたいと思っています。

  • SG: After I got the call, I caught the first flight to England

    SG: 電話を受けてから、イギリス行きの最初の便に乗りました。

  • and arrived into the brightly lit intensive care ward,

    と明るい集中治療病棟に到着。

  • where Mark was lying naked, just under a sheet,

    マークが裸でシーツの下に横たわっていました。

  • connected to machines that were monitoring if he would live.

    彼が生きているかどうかを監視している機械に接続されていました。

  • I said, "I'm here, Mark."

    "ここにいるよ マーク "と言ったんだ

  • And he cried tears he seemed to have saved just for me.

    そして、彼は私のためだけに救ってくれたような涙を流した。

  • I wanted to gather him in my arms, but I couldn't move him,

    私は彼を腕に抱き寄せたかったが、動かすことができなかった。

  • and so I kissed him the way you kiss a newborn baby,

    生まれたばかりの赤ちゃんにキスをするように 彼にキスをしたの

  • terrified of their fragility.

    彼らの脆さに怯えている

  • Later that afternoon, when the bad news had been laid out for us --

    その日の午後、悪いニュースが並べられていたとき、私たちのために--。

  • fractured skull, bleeds on his brain, a possible torn aorta

    頭蓋骨骨折、脳内出血、大動脈断裂の可能性あり

  • and a spine broken in two places, no movement or feeling below his waist --

    背骨が2か所折れていて 腰の下には動きも感覚もありません

  • Mark said to me, "Come here.

    マークが「こっちにおいで」と言ってくれた。

  • You need to get yourself as far away from this as possible."

    "出来るだけ遠ざかる必要がある"

  • As I tried to process what he was saying,

    彼が言っていたことを処理しようとした時に

  • I was thinking, "What the hell is wrong with you?"

    "どうしたんだ?"と思っていたのですが

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • "We can't do this now."

    "今は無理だ"

  • So I asked him, "Are you breaking up with me?"

    だから "別れるの?"って聞いたんですよ。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • And he said, "Look, you signed up for the blindness, but not this."

    彼は言った "あなたは盲目になるために契約したが これは違う"

  • And I answered, "We don't even know what this is,

    と聞くと、「これが何なのかもわからない」と答えました。

  • but what I do know is what I can't handle right now

    でも今はどうしようもないことを知っています。

  • is a breakup while someone I love is in intensive care."

    "愛する人が集中治療室にいる間に 別れてしまう"

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • So I called on my negotiation skills and suggested we make a deal.

    そこで、私の交渉術を呼び、取引をしようと提案しました。

  • I said, "I will stay with you as long as you need me,

    私は「あなたが必要とする限り、私はあなたと一緒にいます。

  • as long as your back needs me.

    あなたの背中が私を必要としている限り

  • And when you no longer need me, then we talk about our relationship."

    あなたが私を必要としなくなった時、私たちの関係について話しましょう。"

  • Like a contract with the possibility to renew in six months.

    半年後に更新する可能性のある契約書のようなものです。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • He agreed and I stayed.

    彼は同意してくれて、私は残った。

  • In fact, I refused to go home even to pack a bag, I slept by his bed,

    実際、私は袋詰めをしても帰宅を拒否し、彼のベッドのそばで寝ていました。

  • when he could eat, I made all his food,

    彼が食べられるようになったら、私は彼の食事を全部作った。

  • and we cried, one or other or both of us together, every day.

    と、毎日のように、片方かもう片方か、二人で一緒に泣いていました。

  • I made all the complicated decisions with the doctors,

    煩雑な判断は全て医師に任せていました。

  • I climbed right into that raging river over rapids that was sweeping Mark along.

    私はマークを流されながら激流の川に登った。

  • And at the first bend in that river, Mark's surgeon told us

    そして、その川の最初の曲がり角で、マークの外科医は言った。

  • what movement and feeling he doesn't get back in the first 12 weeks,

    どのような動きと彼は最初の12週間で戻ってきません'感じています。

  • he's unlikely to get back at all.

    彼は全く復帰できそうにありません。

  • So, sitting by his bed, I began to research why,

    そこで、彼のベッドのそばに座り、その理由を調べ始めました。

  • after this period they call spinal shock,

    この期間の後、彼らは脊髄ショックと呼んでいます。

  • there's no recovery, there's no therapy, there's no cure, there's no hope.

    回復も治療も治療も治療も希望もありません。

  • And the internet became this portal to a magical other world.

    そして、インターネットは魔法のような異世界への入り口となりました。

  • I emailed scientists,

    科学者にメールしました。

  • and they broke through paywalls

    ペイウォールを突破して

  • and sent me their medical journal and science journal articles directly.

    と、彼らの医学雑誌や科学雑誌の記事を直接送ってくれました。

  • I read everything that "Superman" actor Christopher Reeve had achieved,

    スーパーマン」の俳優クリストファー・リーブが成し遂げたことをすべて読みました。

  • after a fall from a horse

    落馬後

  • left him paralyzed from the neck down and ventilated.

    彼は首から下が麻痺していて換気をしていました。

  • Christopher had broken this 12-week spell;

    クリストファーはこの12週間の呪文を破った。

  • he had regained some movement and feeling years after his accident.

    彼は事故から何年も経って、動きや感覚を取り戻していました。

  • He dreamed of a world of empty wheelchairs.

    彼は空っぽの車椅子の世界を夢見ていた。

  • And Christopher and the scientists he worked with fueled us with hope.

    クリストファーと彼の科学者たちは 私たちに希望を与えてくれました

  • MP: You see, spinal cord injury

    MP:ほら、脊髄損傷

  • strikes at the very heart of what it means to be human.

    人間であることの意味の核心に迫る。

  • And it had turned me from my upright, standing, running form,

    そして、それは私を直立し、立って、走っている姿から変えてしまった。

  • into a seated compromise of myself.

    自分自身の妥協点に座して

  • And it's not just the lack of feeling and movement.

    そして、感覚や動きがないだけではありません。

  • Paralysis also interferes with the body's internal systems,

    また、麻痺は身体の内部システムにも干渉します。

  • which are designed to keep us alive.

    私たちが生き続けるために設計されています。

  • Multiple infections, nerve pain, spasms, shortened life spans are common.

    多発性感染症、神経痛、痙攣、寿命が短くなることが多い。

  • And these are the things that exhaust even the most determined

    そして、これらのことは、最も決意を持っている人でさえも疲弊させてしまう

  • of the 60 million people around the world who are paralyzed.

    全世界にいる60000万人の麻痺者のうち

  • Over 16 months in hospital,

    16ヶ月以上の入院。

  • Simone and I were presented with the expert view

    シモーネと私は専門家の見解を提示されました。

  • that hoping for a cure had proven to be psychologically damaging.

    治療を望むことが心理的にダメージを与えることが証明されています。

  • It was like the formal medical system was canceling hope

    正式な医療制度が希望を打ち消すような感じで

  • in favor of acceptance alone.

    受け入れることだけを支持して

  • But canceling hope ran contrary to everything that we believed in.

    しかし、希望を打ち消すことは、私たちが信じていたすべてのものに反していました。

  • Yes, up to this point in history,

    そう、歴史上のこの時点まではね。

  • it had proven to be impossible to find a cure for paralysis,

    麻痺の治療法を見つけることは不可能であることが証明されていました。

  • but history is filled with the kinds of the impossible made possible

    歴史は不可能を可能にしたものである

  • through human endeavor.

    人間の努力によって

  • The kind of human endeavor that took explorers to the South Pole

    探検家を南極点に連れて行った人間の努力のようなもの

  • at the start of the last century.

    前世紀の初めに

  • And the kind of human endeavor

    そして、人間の努力の種類

  • that will take adventurers to Mars in the early part of this century.

    今世紀初頭に火星に冒険者を連れて行くことになる

  • So we started asking,

    それで私たちは尋ね始めました。

  • "Why can't that same human endeavor cure paralysis in our lifetime?"

    "同じ人間の努力がなぜ我々が生きている間に麻痺を治すことができないのか?"

  • SG: Well, we really believed that it can.

    SG: 私たちは、それが可能だと信じていました。

  • My research taught us

    私の研究が教えてくれたのは

  • that we needed to remind Mark's damaged and dormant spinal cord

    マークの傷ついた休眠状態の脊髄を 思い出させる必要があったのです

  • of its upright, standing, running form,

    その直立した、立っている、走っている形の。