Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • Translator: Queenie Lee Reviewer: Peter van de Ven

    訳者:クィーニー・リー レビュアー:ピーター・ヴァン・デ・ヴェン

  • I'm about to tell you some unconventional wisdom, alright?

    今から型破りな知恵を教えてあげようと思うんだけど、いいかな?

  • I called my talk today "The real truth about the 2008 financial crisis."

    今日の私の話を「2008年の金融危機の真相」と呼んでいます。

  • So, I guess what I ask you to do this morning

    それで、今朝お願いすることは

  • is to think about what you believe

    とは、自分が何を信じているかを考えること

  • what the conventional wisdom is about 2008,

    2008年の今までの常識は何だったのか

  • and I'm going to put some words in your mind or describe it this way,

    と、心の中で言葉を並べたり、このように表現してみたりしています。

  • and that is most people believe

    と言うのがほとんどの人が信じている

  • that the free-market capitalist system, especially bankers, are greedy,

    自由市場資本主義システム、特に銀行家は貪欲であるということです。

  • they go through periods of excess speculation,

    彼らは過剰な投機をする時期がある

  • and then the world collapses

    世界が崩壊する

  • and the government has to come in and save us.

    政府が来て助けてくれないと

  • By the way, this is the story that was told about the Great Depression,

    ちなみに、これは大恐慌の時の話です。

  • and it is also the story that is told about the 2008 financial crisis.

    と、2008年の金融危機についても語られています。

  • Now, before I get into the meat of my presentation,

    さて、プレゼンの肉付けに入る前に

  • I want you to think about something else,

    別のことを考えてほしい。

  • and that is that the Federal Reserve

    であり、それは連邦準備制度

  • controls the level of short-term interest rates in our economy.

    私たちの経済の短期金利の水準をコントロールしています。

  • Everybody knows that today,

    今日は誰もが知っていることです。

  • they're holding those interest rates at 0%,

    彼らは金利を0%で維持しています。

  • trying to get the economy moving again.

    景気を回復させようとしている

  • What lots of people don't remember is that back in 2001, 2002 and 2003

    多くの人が覚えていないのは、2001年、2002年、2003年のことです。

  • the Federal Reserve dropped interest rates to 1%.

    米連邦準備制度理事会(FRB)が金利を1%に引き下げた。

  • I want you to think about this.

    考えてみてほしい。

  • Because when you make a decision to take out a loan,

    なぜなら、ローンを組むことを決断した時に

  • when you make a decision to buy a house,

    家の購入を決断するときに

  • what is the most important ingredient of that decision?

    その判断材料として最も重要なのは何か?

  • I mean, obviously, whether you have income,

    明らかに収入があるかどうかだけど

  • whether you like the house,

    家が好きかどうか

  • but one of the most important ingredients of that

    しかし、その中でも最も重要な成分の一つである

  • is the level of interest rates.

    は金利の水準である。

  • Alan Greenspan pushed interest rates

    アラン・グリーンスパンが金利を押し上げた

  • down to 1% in 2003 and 2004.

    2003年と2004年には1%に減少しています。

  • In fact, interest rates were below inflation

    実際、金利はインフレ率を下回っていた

  • for almost three years - below the rate of inflation.

    ほぼ3年間 - インフレ率を下回っています。

  • Now, how do you think about this?

    さて、あなたはこれをどう思いますか?

  • So, when you're looking at a house - can I afford this house, the payment?

    だから、あなたが家を見ているとき、あなたは家を見ている - 私はこの家、支払いを買う余裕がありますか?

  • Obviously,

    明らかに

  • those payment streams are determined by the level of interest rates,

    これらの支払ストリームは、金利の水準によって決定されます。

  • and when interest rates are low,

    と低金利の時に

  • you're going to buy a bigger house,

    あなたは大きな家を買うつもりなんですね。

  • you're going to buy in a better neighborhood,

    あなたは、より良い地域で購入するつもりです。

  • buy cherry cabinets and granite counter tops

    チェリーキャビネットと御影石のカウンタートップを買う

  • because you can afford it.

    余裕があるから

  • So, let me put this into a story that I know you can understand.

    ということで、お分かりになるような話にしてみましょう。

  • And that is, when you come to a green light in your car -

    そして、それは、あなたの車の中で緑の光に来るとき - です。

  • you're driving along, there's a green light -

    青信号が出ているので車を運転していると

  • how many people in here actually have ever stopped at a green light?

    ここで青信号で止まったことがある人は何人いるの?

  • I'm not talking about senior moments.

    シニアモーメントの話ではありません。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • I'm talking about stopping at a green light,

    青信号で止まれって話です。

  • getting out of your car and walking around to the other side,

    車を降りて、反対側に歩いていく。

  • just to make sure the other one really is red

    念のためにもう片方は本当に赤なのかを確認するために

  • Because, obviously, if it was green too,

    だって、明らかに、それも緑だったら。

  • it'd be dangerous to go through that intersection.

    あの交差点を通るのは危険だ

  • So what happens when Alan Greenspan or the Federal Reserve

    アラン・グリーンスパンや連邦準備制度理事会がどうなるか

  • holds interest rates all the way down at 1%?

    金利を1%で維持しているのか?

  • You get a green light.

    緑の光を手に入れる。

  • You get a green light to make a purchase

    あなたは購入するために緑色のライトを取得します。

  • that's bigger than probably you should,

    それは、おそらくあなたがすべきことよりも大きいです。

  • and by the way, the financial system is no different than you.

    ちなみに金融システムはあなたと何ら変わりません。

  • Bankers, they're no different than individuals.

    銀行員は、個人と何ら変わりません。

  • They would say, "Hey, with interest rates so low,

    こんなに金利が低いのに」と言われそうです。

  • leverage, borrowing doesn't matter as much, it's cheap.

    レバレッジ、借入はそれほど重要ではありません、それは安いです。

  • So, why don't we lever up a little bit more?

    ということで、もう少しレバレッジをかけてみてはいかがでしょうか?

  • After all, it's Alan Greenspan, the smartest man in the world,

    結局のところ、世界で一番賢いアラン・グリーンスパンです。

  • that tells us interest rates are 1%;

    それは金利が1%であることを物語っています。

  • in other words, all the lights are green."

    "つまり、すべてのライトが緑になっている"

  • And, so what happens when you hold interest rates down like this?

    それで、こうやって金利を下げていくとどうなるのか?

  • You cause people to make decisions that they wouldn't otherwise make.

    あなたは、人々がそうでなければしないような意思決定をさせる。

  • Now, let me put this in a different perspective.

    さて、これを別の視点から見てみましょう。

  • House prices went up 8% in 2001.

    2001年の住宅価格は8%上昇しました。

  • By 2004, 2005

    2004年、2005年までに

  • they went up 14% in 2004, 15% in 2005.

    2004年には14%、2005年には15%上昇しました。

  • So you could borrow at 1%, especially with those teaser loans,

    だから、特にそのようなティーザーローンでは、1%で借りることができます。

  • and you could have a house that was appreciating at 14%:

    14%で評価されていた家を持っているかもしれない

  • what a great deal!

    なんということでしょう

  • And, so what happened is we encouraged more people to buy homes,

    それで何が起こったのかというと、より多くの人に家を買うように促したのです。

  • bigger homes than they should have at the time.

    当時よりも大きな家に住んでいて

  • We also encouraged bankers to take on more leverage,

    また、銀行員には、より多くのレバレッジをかけることを勧めました。

  • and make more risky bets than they would have

    賭けをするよりもリスクの高い賭けをする

  • if interest rates were higher.

    金利が高ければ

  • In fact, if interest rates would have been 4 or 5%,

    実際、金利が4%や5%になっていたら

  • I don't believe we would have had the housing bubble at all.

    住宅バブルは全くなかったと思います。

  • Now, let's go back in time just a little bit,

    さて、少しだけ時間を遡ってみましょう。

  • because this has happened before.

    なぜなら、これは以前にもあったことだからです。

  • The last time the Federal Reserve really held interest rates too low for too long

    前回、米連邦準備制度理事会があまりにも長い間、金利を低く抑えすぎていたことが判明した。

  • was back in the 1970s.

    は1970年代にさかのぼります。

  • In the 1970s, farmers bought too much land,

    1970年代には、農家が土地を買いすぎた。

  • we drilled too many oil wells,

    油井を掘りすぎた

  • we were betting on oil prices going up forever,

    原油価格が永遠に上がることに賭けていました。

  • and in the 1980s, when farmland prices collapsed and oil collapsed,

    と、農地価格が暴落して石油が暴落した1980年代には

  • banks collapsed too.

    銀行も潰れた。

  • By the way, the entire savings and loan industry

    ちなみに、貯金・ローン業界全体では

  • also collapsed in the 1980s

    も1980年代に崩壊

  • because of the same reason:

    というのも、同じような理由からです。

  • they made too many loans when interest rates were low,

    低金利の時にローンを組みすぎた。

  • and then, when interest rates went up, they collapsed.

    とか言って、金利が上がったら暴落した。

  • At the same time,

    同時に。

  • we made big banks make huge loans to the Latin and South America.

    私たちは、大手銀行に中南米に巨額の融資をさせました。

  • And so, if you go back and look at the 1970s, banks expanded,

    それで、1970年代にさかのぼって見てみると、銀行は拡大していきました。

  • they made loans to farming, housing, oil, Latin and South America,

    彼らは農業、住宅、石油、ラテンアメリカ、南米に融資をした。

  • and all of those parts of the economy collapsed

    そして、それらのすべての部分の経済は崩壊しました。

  • in the late of 70s, early 80s,

    70年代後半から80年代前半に

  • and the banking system was in monster trouble.

    と銀行がモンスタートラブルに見舞われていました。

  • In fact, the eight biggest banks in America in 1983 had no capital -

    実際、1983年にはアメリカの8大銀行の資本金はゼロでした。

  • zero capital -

    ゼロキャピタル

  • because they had lent too much to Latin and South American countries

    ラテンや南米の国々に貸しすぎたからだ。

  • that all collapsed.

    すべてが崩壊した

  • And here's my point of going back to that.

    そして、ここで私が言いたいのは、それに戻ることです。

  • That is if you go back and look at the 1980s,

    それは、遡って1980年代に目を向ければわかることです。

  • the problems of the 1980s - the banking problems -

    1980年代の銀行問題

  • did not take down the entire economy.

    経済全体が崩壊したわけではありません。

  • This time, they did.

    今回は、そうでした。

  • And so, the question is why,

    で、問題はなぜかというと

  • and we're going to deal with that in just a minute.

    すぐに対処しますよ

  • And so one of the things that I want to do

    だから、私がやりたいことの一つは

  • is tell you something I just did, right?

    私がしたことを話してくれないか?

  • This is the picture of the S&P 500 -

    これがS&P500の写真です。

  • the 500 largest companies in the US stock market.

    米国株式市場の大企業500社。

  • It's a picture from 2008 all the way through the first half of 2009.

    2008年から2009年前半までの写真です。

  • What I just recently did is I went back,

    最近やったことは、また行ってきました。

  • and I read the verbatim transcripts

    逐語録を読みました

  • of all the Federal Reserve meetings during 2008.

    2008年中のすべての連邦準備制度理事会会合のうち

  • Now, the reason I just did this

    さて、今やった理由は

  • is because they only come out with a five-year lag.

    は、5年遅れでしか出てこないからです。

  • The Fed they released little statements,

    FBIはほとんど声明を発表していません。

  • and then minutes,

    と数分後には

  • and then five years later,

    そして5年後には

  • they give us the full transcripts of what they've talked about, right?

    彼らが話したことを完全に記録してくれるんだよね?

  • All of those red dots, there's 14 of them, are a Fed meeting.

    この赤い点は全部で14個ありますが、これはFRBの会議です。

  • Normally, the Fed has six or seven meetings,

    通常、FRBは6回か7回の会合を開いています。

  • but that was a crisis year, right?

    でもあれは危機的な年だったんですよね。

  • And so the Fed had 14 meetings that year.

    それでFRBはその年に14回の会合を開いた。

  • Just to put this in perspective,

    ただ、これを踏まえた上で

  • it's 18 or 20 people sitting around a table,

    18人か20人でテーブルを囲んで座っています。

  • and the verbatim transcripts are each of them talking

    逐語録はそれぞれが話しています

  • for three or four minutes

    三分四分

  • if they go around and they vote and they go around again; they vote.

    ぐるぐる回って投票して、またぐるぐる回って、またぐるぐる回って、またぐるぐる回って、またぐるぐる回って、投票する。

  • These transcripts were 1,865 pages long,

    これらの謄本は1,865ページにも及ぶ長さがありました。

  • 559,000 words.

    559,000語です。

  • Now, I read these for you, just so you know.

    これを読んでくれたのはあなたのためよ

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • And some people have a hard time, like, what is 559,000 words?

    あと、559,000語ってなんだよって感じで苦戦してる人もいるけど?

  • Well, the Old Testament is 593,000 words.

    まあ、旧約聖書は59.3万語ですからね。

  • I mean think about that,

    つまり、考えてみてください。

  • we've built the universe,

    私たちは宇宙を構築してきました。

  • wandered around the desert for 40 years, 50 years,

    40年、50年と砂漠をさまよっていました。

  • built an ark ...

    箱舟を作った

  • There is a lot of stuff that happened in the Old Testament.

    旧約聖書の中には、いろいろなことが起こっています。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • The Fed used that many words

    FRBはそれだけの言葉を使った

  • for one year of US economic history.

    アメリカの経済史の1年分。

  • Now, I could head down this road -

    この道を下ることもできる

  • maybe that's another TED talk - because that's one of our problems.

    多分、それは別のTEDの話だと思います - なぜなら、それは私たちの問題の一つだからです。

  • Nonetheless, one of the things I want to point to

    それにもかかわらず、私が指摘したいことの一つは

  • is this huge decline in the market

    は、この大幅な下落

  • that happened in September and October of 2008.

    2008年の9月と10月に起こった

  • You know what happened in September and October of 2008?

    2008年の9月と10月に何があったか知ってるか?

  • Well, first of all, the bloody weekend, September 13th, 14th, I think it was,

    さて、まず、血まみれの週末、9月13日、14日だったと思います。

  • when Lehman Brothers failed, AIG, Fannie Mae, and Freddie Mac,

    リーマン・ブラザーズが破綻した時、AIG、ファニーメイ、フレディマックが

  • and all of those things happened,

    といったことが起こりました。

  • and the Federal Reserve started a program called quantitative easing;

    と米連邦準備制度理事会が量的緩和というプログラムを始めました。

  • that's where they started to buy bonds and inject cash into the economy

    そこから国債を購入し、経済に資金を注入し始めました。

  • in an attempt to save us.

    私たちを救おうとして

  • At the same time, in fact, just a few weeks later,

    同時期に、実際には数週間後のことです。

  • on October 8th of 2008, Hank Paulson, the Treasury secretary,

    2008年10月8日、ハンク・ポールソン財務長官が

  • President Bush, the Bush White House, Congress passed TARP:

    ブッシュ大統領、ブッシュ・ホワイトハウス、議会はTARPを可決した。

  • the Troubled Asset Relief Plan,

    トラブル資産救済計画。

  • and it was 700 billion dollars of government spending

    で、70000億ドルの政府支出でした。

  • to save our banking system, okay?

    銀行システムを救うために

  • I want you to take a look at this chart a little more closely.

    このチャートをもう少しよく見て欲しい。

  • Quantitative easing started right here, TARP was passed right there.

    量的緩和はここから始まって、TARPはここで可決されました。

  • Did it help?

    役に立ちましたか?

  • In fact, the worst part of the crisis was after TARP was passed.

    実際、危機の中で最悪だったのは、TARPが可決された後だった。

  • The stock market fell 40%;

    株式市場は40%下落した。

  • financial-company stocks fell 80% after TARP was passed.

    TARP通過後、金融企業株は80%下落。

  • In fact, if I look at this chart and kind of squint at it,

    実際、このチャートを見て、ちょっと目を細めてみると

  • look at all those red dots,

    すべての赤い点を見てください。

  • I would say the more the Fed met, the more the Fed did, the worse it got.

    FRBが集まれば集まるほど悪化したと言ってもいいだろう。

  • So, something else must have been going on, right?

    他にも何かあったんじゃないの?

  • In my opinion,

    私の考えでは

  • the government did not save us,

    政府は我々を救わなかった

  • and in fact, this is one of the problems that people have

    そして、実はこれは人々が抱える問題の一つです。

  • when they're trying to understand the economy.

    彼らが経済を理解しようとしているとき。

  • You see, there's an interesting fact about our world, and that is

    私たちの世界には興味深い事実があります。

  • the free market - capitalism -

    自由市場-資本主義

  • does not have a press agent;

    には記者がいません。

  • the government does.

    政府はそうしています。

  • The Federal Reserve does.

    連邦準備制度はそうです。

  • In fact, there are about 2,000 books about the financial crisis,

    実際、金融危機の本は2000冊ほどあります。

  • but there are three main ones that have just come out.

    が、今出てきたのは主に3つ。

  • One is by Timothy Geithner,

    一つはティモシー・ガイトナー

  • former Secretary of the Treasury under President Obama.

    オバマ大統領下の元財務長官

  • He was the head of the New York Federal Reserve Bank during 2008.

    2008年にはニューヨーク連邦準備銀行の総裁を務めた。

  • He'd written a book about the crisis;

    彼は危機についての本を書いていました。

  • who do you think he says

    誰のことだと思いますか

  • saved the world?

    世界を救った?

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • Timothy Geithner, of course.

    ティモシー・ガイトナーだ

  • Ben Bernanke.

    ベン・バーナンキ

  • He doesn't have a book out - he has a book of speeches out -

    彼は本を持っていない - 彼はスピーチの本を持っています。

  • who do you think he says

    誰のことだと思いますか

  • saved the world?

    世界を救った?

  • Ben Bernanke.

    ベン・バーナンキ

  • Hank Paulson has a book out,

    ハンク・ポールソンは本を出しています。

  • and who do you think he says saved the world?

    彼が世界を救ったのは誰だと思う?

  • Hank Paulson.

    ハンク・ポールソン

  • In fact, it's not really that they take credit themselves,

    実際には、自分たちの手柄にしているわけではありません。

  • but they credit TARP

    しかし、彼らはTARPを信用している

  • and quantitative easing and stress tests;

    と量的緩和とストレステスト。

  • that's what Timothy Geithner takes credit for:

    それがティモシー・ガイトナーの手柄です。

  • stress testing banks, so that everybody can trust them, right?

    ストレステストで銀行をテストして、みんなが信用できるようにするんだよね?

  • This is where I want to shift gears, just a little bit,

    ここは少しだけでもシフトチェンジしたいところです。

  • because what I want to tell you is why - or explain -

    なぜかというと

  • is why I believe this banking crisis

    この銀行危機を信じています

  • turned into a true overall economic crisis,

    真の全体的な経済危機に変わった。

  • while if you look back in the early 1980s,

    1980年代前半を振り返ってみると

  • where banks had more losses than they did in 2008,

    銀行は2008年に比べて損失が多かった。

  • the economy did not collapse,

    経済が崩壊したわけではありません。

  • and in fact started to accelerate without TARP,

    と、実際にはTARPなしで加速し始めました。

  • without quantitative easing.

    量的緩和をせずに

  • In fact, Paul Volcker was raising interest rates in the early 1980s,

    実際、ポール・ボルカーは1980年代初頭に金利を引き上げていた。

  • and the economy recovered.

    と景気が回復した。

  • Here we cut interest rates to zero,

    ここでは金利をゼロにする。

  • and the economy has grown relatively slowly.

    と、比較的ゆっくりとした経済成長を遂げてきました。

  • So, what caused this problem?

    では、この問題の原因は何なのでしょうか?

  • By the way, in those transcripts that I said that I read,

    ところで、私が読んだと言ったそれらの謄本の中には

  • Ben Bernanke asks his staff to go out and find out how big the problem is,

    ベン・バーナンキは、問題の大きさを知るために、スタッフに外に出るように指示する。

  • how many subprime loans were made,

    サブプライムローンが何件あったか

  • how many losses could we face,

    どれだけの損失に直面するか

  • and he has a staff of about 200 Ph.D. economists,

    と、約200人の博士号を持つ経済学者のスタッフを抱えています。

  • and they came back with a number of 228 billion dollars.

    と言って、2280億ドルという数字で帰ってきました。

  • Now, don't get me wrong,

    誤解しないでください。

  • I'd love 228 billion dollars, right?

    2280億ドルならいいんじゃね?

  • But 228 billion dollars is small compared to a 15 trillion dollar economy.

    しかし、15兆ドルの経済に比べれば、2280億ドルは小さい。

  • So, how did that small problem turn into a problem

    では、その小さな問題がどうやって問題になったのかというと

  • that almost took down a 15 trillion dollar economy,

    15兆ドルの経済を壊滅させそうになった

  • and the answer is mark-to-market accounting.

    そして、その答えはマーク・ツー・マーケット・アカウンティングです。

  • It's a little-known accounting rule

    これはあまり知られていない会計ルールです。

  • that most people know nothing about, right?

    ほとんどの人は何も知らないんですよね?

  • It was put into place in November 2007

    2007年11月に施行されました。

  • after being out of place, not enforced, since 1938.

    1938年から施行されていない、場違いな状態になってから