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  • Hi I'm Joel and I'm Lia and this video is going to be about the British Educational

  • System, in the United Kingdom!

  • Before we get going don't forget to click subscribe if you haven't already we post videos

  • every week. Don't forget to go and follow us on our Instagram we post there daily. You're

  • missing out if you're not. We watch each others story. Lia is my favourite Instagrammer. Likewise

  • for Joel.

  • So, in the UK, in England specifically where we live, we have gone through the British

  • educational system.

  • [Singing] Lets start at the very beginning, a very good place to start. So, if we are

  • going to start at the very beginning. Pre school, or as we call it 'Nursery' in the

  • UK, is where a child would go from age three... Well you can actually start earlier, if your

  • parents are full time working you can put your child into nursery from one years old.

  • All the way up until about four when you start school. You don't have to go, it's not a legal

  • requirement. It tends to be for parents that are like Lia said, are either working or if

  • you want to get your child a bit integrated and used to being away from you, and being

  • around other kids.

  • Then, at age four you go to primary school. Or elementary school as I believe some people

  • call it. Not here, we don't call it that. I'm just trying to touch all the bases. American

  • etc. I don't know what elementary school might be called in other places in Europe but just

  • primary school is what we call it here. You go from the term before your fifth birthday.

  • Anyway, it's around late four to five (years old) is when you start. You start by going

  • into Reception or year R. Reception is what we call it. It's so sweet. So reception is

  • the first year in school and that's the cutest year. You start, year one, year two, year

  • three, all the way up to year six. By that point you should be age 11. You have exams,

  • I think they are called SATS that determine what set you will be in (at secondary school).

  • Set one, set two, set three, when you go to high school. Based on how clever you are.

  • When you turn 12 you go to big school. Big school, which we call secondary school. So

  • it might be referred to as high school but over here we call it secondary school or informally

  • we might call it big school because you've just come from little school - where you were

  • a big fish in a small pond and you go to be a small fish in a big pond.

  • Yes so in my school, my primary school, there were 30 people or less in the year [in comparison

  • to my] secondary school, there were 150 in every year group. I know there's a school

  • near me where there is a 1000 in each year group. It's huge! Massive!

  • So every secondary school has their own specialism as well in the UK. The one I went to was a

  • performing arts specialist school so all their facilities were amazing, based around the

  • arts. But you can get sports based schools, you can get science based school. What was

  • yours? Ours was a technology specialist school. So you probably had loads of great computer

  • systems. Amazing stuff! That [secondary school] is between ages 12 to 16.

  • Some people might call the year group 'grades' in the US. But their grades don't match our

  • year groups. So year six isn't necessarily grade six. That's why it's confusing. You

  • go all the way through from year 8, 9, 10, 11. In year 11 you have exams. Yep, GCSE's.

  • Then you have choices to make. You can decide to stop your education. In the UK you can

  • stop school at 16, you're ok to just go straight into work. Do whatever you like. Or you can

  • go on to study, and from there you either go sixth form or college. Sixth form or college

  • or an apprenticeship which is the same as going away to work. But you have choices.

  • We both chose to go to college.

  • So the main difference between college and sixth form is that traditionally, a sixth

  • form is attached to your secondary school. So you would do year 7, 8 , 9, 10, 11, sixth

  • form, sixth form. So you'd do two years of sixth form [year 12 and 13].

  • But a college is a completely separate institution. So you'd go year 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 at [secondary]

  • school, and then you'd go to a completely different place and you'd do two years at

  • the college. But both of our colleges called themselves a sixth form. Even though they

  • weren't attached to a school. Bizarre. England need to sort that out. It's not clear.

  • I prefer saying sixth form to college. Sixth form sounds a little bit more posh. The reason

  • being is because at a college in England you can choose to study things like hairdressing,

  • plumbing, vocational studies. Things that aren't academic might be offered at a college

  • whereas at sixth form it would just be a - levels which are Maths, English, Sciences, Languages.

  • [Joel] I did English Language, Psychology, History and Theatre Studies.

  • [Lia] My a-levels were Maths (which I dropped at AS level), English Literature, Theatre

  • Studies and Media Studies.

  • Which was a nice mix.

  • When you've finished college, obviously you go onto university. University is not for

  • a set amount of years. Whereas school and college is. University can go on for years

  • and years. Depending upon the subject you choose to take. So as a rule, at university

  • your course will be three years long. Also you will pick your subject before you go which

  • I found out from my old American flatmate. That, in America you don't do that. You just

  • go to college which is their version of university and you sort of take loads of different modules.

  • So you could do a module in art, you could do a module in science and you can do a module

  • in this. You end up getting your path towards what you want to do, whereas in the UK, you

  • chose your subject and then thats it.

  • So after going to drama school, I chose to study English and Linguistics at university

  • and thats what my degree was. But in the US you can just choose loads of different little

  • bits [before choosing what you actually want to do]

  • I would prefer that. Then I might have actually gone to uni. It's very hard to pick one thing

  • that you want to do for that amount of time - nothing interested me that much to want

  • to want to go and do it [for three years]. Other than doing, well Joel and I went to

  • drama school and that obviously really interests me so that's why I did it. It's expensive

  • too, the fees of going to University in the UK are 9,000 a year. A few years ago it was

  • only 3,000 a year. But we can't complain because I know that in some countries you pay tens

  • of thousands per year and they don't have student loans either.

  • The [UK] government will pay for us to go to University but then we have to pay them

  • back but it gets taken out of your pay when you get a job. £20 a month could come out

  • of your bank account to pay off your [student] loan.

  • So education in the UK, in England specifically, on the whole, can be done for free. Up until

  • you get to university because then it's a choice. Going to university isn't [compulsory].

  • I didn't go! If you do want to go it's 9,000 pounds a year [or a student loan]. So, additionally

  • you can pay to do college and school if you choose to go private rather than comprehensive.

  • I know it can be really confusing when you're talking to someone about education and they

  • might say "Oh i'm in grade.. blah blah" or "I'm a sophomore at college".What does it

  • mean? It's really confusing.

  • Also with the whole public school private school state school thing. In the UK, public

  • school means private school, and so does private school. But in the US, public school means

  • state school. Yeah, free. The word public school here means they've paid. Neither of

  • us went to public school because public school means like, Harrow, Eton, etc. It's very correct.

  • I don't have the words to explain it. Neither of us went. I'd say we went to private school

  • rather than public school. Because public is slightly different.

  • So I hope that's made it a little bit more clear, especially for people who are trying

  • to understand what the education system is like over here. I think it's really interesting,

  • do let us know if it's like that where you're from. I don't think it is, it's going to get

  • so confusing. The comments are gonna get confusing. But we will end it there!

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  • See you next week! Bye.

Hi I'm Joel and I'm Lia and this video is going to be about the British Educational

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A2 初級

イギリス教育制度 (British Education System)

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    Amy.Lin に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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