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  • Our next speaker is Andreas Gal from Mozilla

  • Andreas is currently working on various development of web technology

  • including the mobile operation system solution: Boot to Gecko

  • his topic is "Gaia: A modern smartphone user interface in HTML5 and JavaScript"

  • Let's welcome him

  • All right, um, sorry for the technical problems there

  • so let's get it started

  • OK. My name is Andreas Gal

  • I work for Mozilla, and I am the director of research and development

  • and my group is a bunch of different researchy and development projects from Mozilla

  • So basically the goal of my group is to identify things you can not do as the web

  • and find out why unit can not do that and then gonna fix that

  • and I want a year ago, we decided to find out why mobile phones or cell phones were in general mobile devices

  • are not really built as a web

  • If you look as the desktop, almost everything in desktop happens as the web

  • It's very rare these days that people make software for windows 32 APIs

  • Everything is delivered as the web and for some reason phones and mobile devices work very differently

  • so we.. we just set out to find out why

  • and as a part of that, we started to build a project called Boot to Gecko, that's what we'll talk about today

  • and let's start with some motivation and explain to you

  • why I think that it's so strange that we have Android and iOS

  • and why I think it doesn't even make any sense to me

  • those things should not be around when we usually have the web

  • so let's talk about that a little bit

  • so first of all, I am not sure how many of you know Mozilla

  • we have a very interesting history

  • so Mozilla is a non-profit entity

  • we are very distributed and global

  • we are in many different countries

  • amongst others we're in taiwan

  • and the main thing you people know us is from Firefox

  • it's the web browser product we are making

  • and the slide we have made we have more than 450 million users

  • I think now it's close to 500 million

  • and we are localized in lot of languages

  • and there are, mozilla foundation

  • which is the nonprofit entity

  • that really is mozilla, actually it also owns a company, the mozilla corporation

  • and that company has over 650 employees

  • again this slide is a little out of date. I think by now we have 700 employees

  • and we have subsidiaries in 15 different countries

  • ant this is just the core of mozilla, this is basically the mozilla foundation itself

  • and a bunch of people that mozilla foundation employs to implement firefox

  • but around that there's such a large community of people

  • so these thousands of people who actually help us to develop firefox

  • and there are couple of people who are in this room as well who have contributed to firefox

  • and in addition to that, to the, in addition to the actual core of firefox that people build the browser itself

  • there is also very large community of building add-ons

  • so we have more than 40000 add-ons people built, these are things that you can build to customize the browser with, and

  • you can build small than code snippets that make your browser behave as certain way that you would like

  • so we don't do all the customization ourselves

  • we don't have to be a browser with everything that you want to do

  • but we do as the platform for you, that you can go and customize the way you like

  • and much of that is done in javascript as all

  • so that's a very popular way of extending firefox

  • and that is also being built by thousands of contributers

  • now, mozilla's history goes back more than 10 years ago

  • so more than 10 years ago, there was a company called Netscape that made, uh, pretty much of the first commercially successful browser

  • and netscape's business model was, they were making a browser as a closed-source proprietary software product

  • and there were giving it out for free for people to use

  • and how the web really started growing

  • suddenly the web soon substituted the FTP and telnet, which are really boring race to attack as the web

  • they came just like lively things you can touch and colors, and

  • that's actually interesting. So netscape gives their browser away for free, if we are private user, but they charge money if you're a company

  • and, um, there's rapid development beginning after microsoft decided to make a browser as well

  • and at that point this entire model started working because microsoft made a browser as well, it was also closed-source

  • microsoft made it, and microsoft gave you the binary

  • but then microsoft gave away the browser completely for free, that was internet explorer

  • and this of course, is very difficult for netcape, because netscape was deriving its money from selling netscape

  • the Navigator browser

  • and microsoft did not need the money from IE, they just really making money on windows

  • so very quickly, netscape disappeared from the market place in the background of all this

  • and as netscape was kind of dying, the one of the last dying acts of netscape was create the mozilla foundation

  • and there was a very interesting rationale behind that

  • netscape observed that you can't really compete on the web, making a web browser

  • until the web is really open, and completely based on open standards

  • so when netscape ran into, the, the microsoft very quickly started to get a little market share

  • and microsoft started expanding the web as microsoft-only technology

  • a very famous example for that is ActiveX, who in here has ever heard something like ActiveX

  • so actually here in asia it's still even used a little bit more than it's used than other parts of the world

  • and that's a horrible piece of microsoft technology, it's completely non-standard, only mocrosoft can implement it

  • so this is actually often a problem still to this day, for firefox in some asian markets

  • and pretty good in mainland china, where ActiveX are still being used, because we can't implement it

  • nobody knows how it works. Only microsoft knows how it works

  • so based on those observations that netscape made 10 years ago, has ever kinda like dying, and

  • they realized that they have to make sure that the web is open

  • and that, everything is implemented within open standards

  • because only them can others implement the same standards

  • and this led to this core mission, of mozilla, that we wanna get people choice

  • so mozilla makes firefox so that's very likely when we use firefox

  • but firefox's even more important for us is that you have choice

  • you can decide what you want to use, you don't have to use internet explorer

  • there's couple of options for you

  • so this is the history of mozilla, and mozilla in couple of years, it turned the area with a very strong success

  • so now our 30% of people using the web are using firefox browser

  • and in many countries, we are the #1 browser amongst others, in european countries

  • now, compare the web today, it's more than it was 10 years ago when its journey started

  • so I am not sure how many of you here have used the really old version of internet explorer, alright, the IE6

  • that was really a miserable experience

  • the web really sucked, like that

  • you could barely look at documents, and everything was slow, and it was crashing all the time

  • and the browser has very few capabilities

  • you could display a document, kind of sort of, and you could render some fonts

  • but all the cool stuffs that it's part of web today, you can't do with IE

  • and, it's a bit of obvious why you couldn't do that, because

  • first of all, microsoft was the only party that could implement many of these standards in IE6 such as ActiveX

  • and also there was no competition there was basically only IE

  • 98% of people have done when IE6 came out, they were all using internet explorer

  • so microsoft, and it wasn't a new pressure to really make the web better because people are using it epidemic

  • so compare that today, today everything is really really different

  • so today, most that pages that you go to are based on open standards

  • there is very little activex used in most parts of the world for example

  • and there's no longer just one browser, internet explorer

  • there's many many browsers now so there's firefox obviously which we make

  • but there's also chrome, and safari, and there's opera which is little more popular in europe than here

  • but then, also actually there's IE, IE's back

  • IE is in new version 9, and that browser is much much better than IE6

  • so even microsoft suddenly had to go back and provide a good browser

  • which have for many years then you'll feel it's neccessary

  • so how did this happen? how did we get from a really crappy web to awesome web as many browsers

  • so mozilla actually have a very big part in that

  • this cuz all back to our missions. So our mission is to make sure you can choose

  • you can decide which browser to use and ideally, you'd really like it when you choose firefox

  • but that's kind of like our secondary goal

  • the primary goal is to make sure you actually have a choice first of all

  • and, as how we said, the key thing for all of that is interoperable standards

  • if it's not based on standards, there's no real choice

  • because someone like microsoft can go ahead, and implement some other activex thing

  • and only microsoft knows how to implement that

  • and it sized how we are using that

  • that you can only use a microsoft browser to go there

  • so really the only way to ensure that you can use whichever browser you like as we make sure all the browsers implement the same technology

  • this of course is really nice for content providers

  • because if you are creating a web site, and you base everything in open standards

  • then suddenly, you write your code once

  • and it runs accross all these different browsers and all these different devices

  • but there's actually a very nice other effect of this

  • so do we explain that to you i'm gonna use a little example here

  • so you see here, su.. rather a blurry screen here

  • um.. a benchmark graph so in the last 3 or 4 years

  • the different browser vendors happened in a very vicious performance game

  • everyone is trying to build the fastest possible browser

  • why are we doing that

  • at first of all we want to build the fast browser and for sure

  • but also, there's competition

  • the press likes writing about benchmarks

  • alright then, every time new version of chrome comes out

  • they wanna benchmark and chrome must be fast here, chrome must be fast there

  • there firefox is faster and then you read that

  • and you might decide which browser to use based on which browser is faster

  • and you won't do to use all browser, you have to go and make a browser faster

  • so a couple of years ago, and then chrome came out, they really sent a new benchmark, that's called V8

  • uh, or V8Bench it's actually a really terrible benchmark

  • so it doesn't really represent what the web does but it doesn't really matter

  • the press started benchmarking with this benchmark, so chrome was out, and there was a benchmark

  • we were really slow on it

  • so on the left side of this it's August 3 (?)

  • um, oops August 3, um

  • you could see that, we were really slow

  • so saf.. um, safari and chrome some webkit thing 2000 3000 milliseconds

  • we were taking 7000 milliseconds so we were twice as slow as chrome

  • that's really bad the press's gonna say that wow the firefox is very slow in this benchmark

  • it didn't really matter much actually in practice like the web wasn't really slow because of the benchmark

  • but it doesn't really matter