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  • Well, if you believe Herbert Simon--

  • who has a Nobel, and I do believe him--

  • he's argued that the work of managers, scientists,

  • engineers, lawyers, the work that really kind of steers

  • and shapes our society, its economy, its government

  • organizations.

  • That work is largely about making decisions and solving

  • problems.

  • It's worthwhile spending a little bit of time thinking

  • about how we do this.

  • And that's really what our class management science is about,

  • basically solving making decisions and solving problems.

  • My name is Fred Easton.

  • I'm a Professor of Operations and Supply Chain Management

  • at Syracuse University.

  • I teach there every day, and this is a course

  • that I developed quite some time ago.

  • Believe it or not, I think we started with Lotus 123.

  • The key idea behind the course is

  • that its built around a spreadsheet,

  • and in fact, sometimes we call it spreadsheet optimization.

  • A little bit about my bio, I guess in my undergraduate days,

  • I studied unusual combination, business, chemistry,

  • and biology.

  • I sort of had it in the back of my mind I wanted

  • to work in one of the health professions,

  • but an energy utility interviewed

  • me and it sound like a great deal

  • to go to work for them for a while.

  • So after five years later, and another degree, an MBA,

  • I was kind of thinking maybe it was time to get back

  • to my original goals.

  • But in the process, I also applied to graduate school

  • and ended up falling for the charms of Seattle.

  • So my PhD is in Operations Management from the University

  • of Washington.

  • I left there and came to Syracuse University, where

  • I've been pretty much ever since, working

  • my way through the ranks.

  • My research is primarily in resource management,

  • largely in the service sector, workforce scheduling

  • and staffing.

  • And we're finding lots of applications

  • these days in health care.

  • So that will probably permeate some of our discussions

  • as we go through the class.

  • Let me give you a broad outline of what

  • we will be doing this semester.

  • I mentioned that the course is built around spreadsheets.

  • So we're going to be looking at Lotus--

  • or sorry, Lotus, that was a long time ago.

  • Wasn't it?-- Microsoft Excel, and we're

  • up to the 2013 version in the stuff

  • that we're using with this class.

  • But I think maybe by the time it lands on your desk,

  • you'll be able to use the 2016 version of Office.

  • So there might be some minor differences,

  • but I don't think they will be too significant.

  • We'll guide you through it.

  • Now, all of us are spreadsheet experts, I'll bet,

  • but I'll show you, hopefully, a couple of things

  • that you haven't seen before, some things to do with Excel.

  • So woven into most of our class meetings

  • will be a couple of new Excel features.

  • For those of you that don't feel quite as comfortable with it,

  • we've got a bit of an orientation and some training

  • that you can do offline to get yourself up to speed.

  • Almost everybody survives the course.

  • We'll take you through, I guess, some ad hoc solution

  • methodologies first and then dive into that

  • the workhorse of our course, at least

  • for solution methodologies, that's Excel Solver.

  • And you'll quickly discover that solving

  • these problems, for the most part, isn't the big deal.

  • The big deal, the real challenge,

  • is really more of an art, form and that's

  • translating a problem that you think you understand

  • into something that your spreadsheet model can

  • understand, translating it into an algebraic series

  • of constraints, equations, formulations.

  • Really what we're going to try, that

  • will be where we're going to develop proficiency

  • with modeling for decision-making purposes.

  • We'll look at linear programs, network linear programs,

  • integer programs, non-linear programs, goal programs,

  • multi-objective programs, and get a great sense of these.

  • We'll find applications that might be familiar to you,

  • and others that you may not have encountered before,

  • as a means of improving your decision making.

  • We'll look at tools that can help

  • you compare dissimilar units in your organization.

  • Maybe get a sense of who's using resources effectively

  • and who can maybe benefit from what others

  • have learned in that regard.

  • I think we conclude with a little study of waiting,

  • something that we're all quite proficient at, it seems.

  • So that's pretty much the road map of where we're going.

  • It's one of my favorite subjects.

  • I like it a lot, and I hope by the end of this you do as well.

Well, if you believe Herbert Simon--

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B1 中級

コースの説明。経営学の原理 (Course Description: Principles of Management Science)

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    Swift Wang に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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