Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • Every summer when I was growing up,

    翻訳: Hiroshi Uchiyama 校正: Masaki Yanagishita

  • I would fly from my home in Canada to visit my grandparents,

    子供のころ毎年夏になると

  • who lived in Mumbai, India.

    カナダの家から祖父母のいる

  • Now, Canadian summers are pretty mild at best --

    インドのムンバイに旅行しました

  • about 22 degrees Celsius or 72 degrees Fahrenheit

    カナダの夏は気温が上がっても 穏やかという程度です

  • is a typical summer's day, and not too hot.

    気温は摂氏22度 華氏なら72度くらいが

  • Mumbai, on the other hand, is a hot and humid place

    一般的な夏の気温で さほど暑くありません

  • well into the 30s Celsius or 90s Fahrenheit.

    ところがムンバイは暑く多湿で

  • As soon as I'd reach it, I'd ask,

    摂氏30度 華氏なら90度にもなります

  • "How could anyone live, work or sleep in such weather?"

    ムンバイに到着するとすぐに

  • To make things worse, my grandparents didn't have an air conditioner.

    「どうしたらこんな気候で生活し 働き 寝ることができるの?」と尋ねました

  • And while I tried my very, very best,

    更に悪い事には祖父母は エアコンを持っていませんでした

  • I was never able to persuade them to get one.

    かなり頑張ってはみましたが

  • But this is changing, and fast.

    エアコンを買うよう 説得するのは無理でした

  • Cooling systems today collectively account for 17 percent

    でも そんな状況は 急速に変わりつつあります

  • of the electricity we use worldwide.

    冷却系で使われる電力は 世界の全電力使用の

  • This includes everything from the air conditioners

    17パーセントにも上ります

  • I so desperately wanted during my summer vacations,

    この数字は 私が夏休みに

  • to the refrigeration systems that keep our food safe and cold for us

    喉から手が出るほど 欲しかったエアコンも

  • in our supermarkets,

    食料を安全に冷たく保存できる スーパーマーケットの冷蔵システムも

  • to the industrial scale systems that keep our data centers operational.

    含んでいますし

  • Collectively, these systems account for eight percent

    データセンターが稼働するための 工業的な規模のシステムも含みます

  • of global greenhouse gas emissions.

    冷却システム全体で 世界の温室効果ガス発生量の

  • But what keeps me up at night

    8パーセントを占めます

  • is that our energy use for cooling might grow sixfold by the year 2050,

    しかし私を悩ませるのは

  • primarily driven by increasing usage in Asian and African countries.

    冷却に利用されるエネルギーは 2050年までに6倍に膨らみ

  • I've seen this firsthand.

    アジアやアフリカの国々での利用拡大により 激増する可能性があります

  • Nearly every apartment in and around my grandmother's place

    私はこの目で見てきました

  • now has an air conditioner.

    祖母の家の周りでも ほとんどのアパートで

  • And that is, emphatically, a good thing

    今はエアコンがあります

  • for the health, well-being and productivity

    これは 高温の環境で暮らす 人々にとって

  • of people living in warmer climates.

    健康や生活条件や 生産性といった点では

  • However, one of the most alarming things about climate change

    とても良いことです

  • is that the warmer our planet gets,

    ただ 気候変動に関わって 憂慮すべきなのは

  • the more we're going to need cooling systems --

    地球が暖まるにつれて

  • systems that are themselves large emitters of greenhouse gas emissions.

    どんどん冷却システムが 必要になる上に

  • This then has the potential to cause a feedback loop,

    そのシステム自体が温室効果ガスの 巨大な発生源となるのです

  • where cooling systems alone

    こうして悪循環に陥るかもしれません

  • could become one of our biggest sources of greenhouse gases

    冷却システムだけでも

  • later this century.

    21世紀の後半には 温室効果ガスの最大の発生源となる

  • In the worst case,

    可能性があるのです

  • we might need more than 10 trillion kilowatt-hours of electricity every year,

    最悪のケースでは

  • just for cooling, by the year 2100.

    2100年までに 毎年10兆キロワット時を超える電力が

  • That's half our electricity supply today.

    冷却のために必要になるかもしれません

  • Just for cooling.

    この数字は現在の電力供給量の 半分に当たります

  • But this also point us to an amazing opportunity.

    冷却だけでです

  • A 10 or 20 percent improvement in the efficiency of every cooling system

    しかし同時に これは私たちに チャンスを与えてくれます

  • could actually have an enormous impact on our greenhouse gas emissions,

    全冷却システムの効率が 1〜2割向上するだけで

  • both today and later this century.

    温室効果ガスの発生量に 大きな影響を与えられるかもしれません

  • And it could help us avert that worst-case feedback loop.

    今でも そしてこの先でも

  • I'm a scientist who thinks a lot about light and heat.

    ひどい悪循環を避けるのに 役立つかもしれません

  • In particular, how new materials allow us to alter the flow

    私は光や熱を研究する科学者です

  • of these basic elements of nature

    特に新しい材料が それまでは不可能と考えられていた方法で

  • in ways we might have once thought impossible.

    自然の基本的要素の流れを 改変できるか研究しています

  • So, while I always understood the value of cooling

    夏休みの経験から

  • during my summer vacations,

    冷却の価値を理解しつつ

  • I actually wound up working on this problem

    この問題に取り組み始めたのは

  • because of an intellectual puzzle that I came across about six years ago.

    6年前に遭遇した 知的難問がきっかけです

  • How were ancient peoples able to make ice in desert climates?

    古代の人々が砂漠の気候で どのように氷を作れたのか?

  • This is a picture of an ice house,

    この画像は氷の部屋

  • also called a Yakhchal, located in the southwest of Iran.

    ヤクチャルと言われるもので イランの南西にあるものです

  • There are ruins of dozens of such structures throughout Iran,

    このような建物はイラン中に数十とあり

  • with evidence of similar such buildings throughout the rest of the Middle East

    同じような建物が 他の中東の国々や 中国に至るまで存在することが

  • and all the way to China.

    確認されています

  • The people who operated this ice house many centuries ago,

    何世紀も前に このような 氷の部屋を利用していた人々は

  • would pour water in the pool you see on the left

    左手に見えるような水槽に

  • in the early evening hours, as the sun set.

    日没後の夕刻の早い時間に 水を注ぎました

  • And then something amazing happened.

    すると不思議なことが起きるのです

  • Even though the air temperature might be above freezing,

    気温は氷点下になっていなくても

  • say five degrees Celsius or 41 degrees Fahrenheit,

    例えば摂氏5度 華氏41度くらいで

  • the water would freeze.

    水が凍るのです

  • The ice generated would then be collected in the early morning hours

    生成された氷は早朝に回収され

  • and stored for use in the building you see on the right,

    右手に見える建物に保存しました

  • all the way through the summer months.

    夏の期間中もずっとです

  • You've actually likely seen something very similar at play

    同じような光景を 目にしたことがあるかもしれません

  • if you've ever noticed frost form on the ground on a clear night,

    良く晴れた夜に 気温が氷点よりずっと高くても

  • even when the air temperature is well above freezing.

    霜が降りているのに 気づいたことがあるでしょう

  • But wait.

    でも待ってください

  • How did the water freeze if the air temperature is above freezing?

    どうして気温が氷点を上回るのに 水が凍るのでしょうか?

  • Evaporation could have played an effect,

    蒸発の影響もあるかもしれませんが 水が凍るほどではありません

  • but that's not enough to actually cause the water to become ice.

    別の何かが冷却したに違いありません

  • Something else must have cooled it down.

    パイを窓枠に置いて 冷やすことを考えてください

  • Think about a pie cooling on a window sill.

    パイを冷ますには 温度の低い方に 熱を逃す必要があります

  • For it to be able to cool down, its heat needs to flow somewhere cooler.

    つまり周囲の空気にです

  • Namely, the air that surrounds it.

    信じがたく聞こえますが

  • As implausible as it may sound,

    熱は水槽の水から 冷たい宇宙へと流れるのです

  • for that pool of water, its heat is actually flowing to the cold of space.

    どのようにして起こるのか?

  • How is this possible?

    多くの自然の物体と同じように 水槽の水は

  • Well, that pool of water, like most natural materials,

    熱を光として放出します

  • sends out its heat as light.

    熱放射の概念として知られています

  • This is a concept known as thermal radiation.

    この瞬間にも私たちは誰でも 熱を赤外線として

  • In fact, we're all sending out our heat as infrared light right now,

    周囲に放出しています

  • to each other and our surroundings.

    熱線カメラで可視化することができますが

  • We can actually visualize this with thermal cameras

    そのイメージは 今見て頂いている様な画像です

  • and the images they produce, like the ones I'm showing you right now.

    水槽の水は熱を大気に

  • So that pool of water is sending out its heat

    放出します

  • upward towards the atmosphere.

    大気と大気中の分子は

  • The atmosphere and the molecules in it

    熱の一部を吸収し再度放出します

  • absorb some of that heat and send it back.

    これこそが気候変動の原因となる 温室効果です

  • That's actually the greenhouse effect that's responsible for climate change.

    ここが理解すべき重要な部分です

  • But here's the critical thing to understand.

    大気は熱をすべて吸収することはありません

  • Our atmosphere doesn't absorb all of that heat.

    もしそうなるなら 地球はもっと温暖な惑星になったはずです

  • If it did, we'd be on a much warmer planet.

    ある波長—

  • At certain wavelengths,

    具体的には8〜13ミクロンの波長が

  • in particular between eight and 13 microns,

    大気の伝送窓として知られています

  • our atmosphere has what's known as a transmission window.

    この大気の伝送窓は 赤外線としての熱を 効果的に大気の外側に逃がし

  • This window allows some of the heat that goes up as infrared light

    水槽の熱を運び出すことを可能にします

  • to effectively escape, carrying away that pool's heat.

    熱は遥かに冷たい場所へと 逃げていくのです

  • And it can escape to a place that is much, much colder.

    大気上部の冷たい所へと

  • The cold of this upper atmosphere

    更に遠い宇宙へと

  • and all the way out to outer space,

    そこは 摂氏マイナス270度 あるいは

  • which can be as cold as minus 270 degrees Celsius,

    華氏マイナス454度にもなります

  • or minus 454 degrees Fahrenheit.

    水槽の水は空から輻射される熱より

  • So that pool of water is able to send out more heat to the sky

    さらに多くの熱を空に放出します

  • than the sky sends back to it.

    そのため

  • And because of that,

    水槽は周囲の温度より低くなるのです

  • the pool will cool down below its surroundings' temperature.

    この効果は夜間冷却 あるいは 放射冷却として

  • This is an effect known as night-sky cooling

    知られています

  • or radiative cooling.

    気候学者と気象学者には とても重要な自然現象として

  • And it's always been understood by climate scientists and meteorologists

    知られてきました

  • as a very important natural phenomenon.

    この事実を知ったのは

  • When I came across all of this,

    スタンフォードの博士課程を 終える頃でした

  • it was towards the end of my PhD at Stanford.

    この冷却方法としての 明らかな単純さに

  • And I was amazed by its apparent simplicity as a cooling method,

    とても驚きました

  • yet really puzzled.

    この手法をぜひ使おう!

  • Why aren't we making use of this?

    現在 科学者や技術者が 10年近くこのアイデアについて

  • Now, scientists and engineers had investigated this idea

    研究しています

  • in previous decades.

    ところが ひとつ 大きな問題があります

  • But there turned out to be at least one big problem.

    「夜間」冷却と呼ばれるのには 理由があります

  • It was called night-sky cooling for a reason.

    なぜか?

  • Why?

    それは太陽のせいです

  • Well, it's a little thing called the sun.

    冷却する表面は

  • So, for the surface that's doing the cooling,

    空に向いている必要があります

  • it needs to be able to face the sky.

    日中は

  • And during the middle of the day,

    一番冷たくなってほしいものが

  • when we might want something cold the most,

    残念ながら太陽に向いてしまい

  • unfortunately, that means you're going to look up to the sun.

    太陽はほとんどの物体を加熱し

  • And the sun heats most materials up

    冷却効果を完全に相殺してしまいます

  • enough to completely counteract this cooling effect.

    私は仲間とともに多くの時間を費やし

  • My colleagues and I spend a lot of our time

    極小スケールで材料を 作る方法を考えています

  • thinking about how we can structure materials

    光を利用して その材料で 新しい価値あることができるように

  • at very small length scales

    そのスケールは光の波長よりも 小さなものです

  • such that they can do new and useful things with light --

    この分野をナノフォトニクスとか

  • length scales smaller than the wavelength of light itself.

    メタマテリアル研究と呼びますが ここから発想を得て

  • Using insights from this field,

    史上初めて 日中でも 放射冷却を可能にする方法が

  • known as nanophotonics or metamaterials research,

    あるかもしれないと気づいたのです

  • we realized that there might be a way to make this possible during the day

    実現のために 多層光材料を設計しました

  • for the first time.

    これは その顕微鏡画像です

  • To do this, I designed a multilayer optical material

    厚さは 標準的な髪の毛の太さの 40分の1未満です

  • shown here in a microscope image.

    2つのことを同時に行うことができます

  • It's more than 40 times thinner than a typical human hair.

    1つ目は放熱

  • And it's able to do two things simultaneously.

    大気が熱を最も逃がしやすい所に向けてです

  • First, it sends its heat out

    放熱先は宇宙にしました

  • precisely where our atmosphere lets that heat out the best.

    2つ目は太陽による加熱を防止します

  • We targeted the window to space.

    太陽光を とてもよく反射します

  • The second thing it does is it avoids getting heated up by the sun.

    最初にテストしたのは スタンフォードの屋上でしたが

  • It's a very good mirror to sunlight.

    ご覧の通りです

  • The first time I tested this was on a rooftop in Stanford

    このデバイスを少しの間放置して

  • that I'm showing you right here.

    数分後に近寄りました

  • I left the device out for a little while,

    数秒もせず機能していることが分かりました

  • and I walked up to it after a few minutes,

    なぜ?

  • and within seconds, I knew it was working.

    触ったら冷たかったのです

  • How?

    (拍手)

  • I touched it, and it felt cold.

    これが どれだけ奇妙で 直観から外れているかというと

  • (Applause)

    この材料やその類似物は

  • Just to emphasize how weird and counterintuitive this is:

    日陰から日向に移して 太陽が射していても

  • this material and others like it

    冷たくなるのです

  • will get colder when we take them out of the shade,

    お見せしているのは 最初の実験のデータです

  • even though the sun is shining on it.

    この材料の温度は 気温と比べて摂氏5度以上

  • I'm showing you data here from our very first experiment,

    あるいは華氏9度以上 低い状態を保ちました

  • where that material stayed more than five degrees Celsius,

    直射日光が当たっていたのにです

  • or nine degrees Fahrenheit, colder than the air temperature,

    私たちが使った素材を 大規模に製造する方法は

  • even though the sun was shining directly on it.

    すでに存在しています

  • The manufacturing method we used to actually make this material

    とてもワクワクしています

  • already exists at large volume scales.

    なぜならただ冷たくするだけではなく

  • So I was really excited,

    何かを実現して世に役立つ機会を 得られたかもしれないからです

  • because not only do we make something cool,

    そのことが次の大きな疑問へと導きます

  • but we might actually have the opportunity to do something real and make it useful.

    このアイデアで省エネを どう実現するか?

  • That brings me to the next big question.

    この技術でエネルギーを節約する 最も直接的な方法は

  • How do you actually save energy with this idea?

    現代の空調や冷蔵の

  • Well, we believe the most direct way to save energy with this technology

    システム効率を増強することであると 信じています

  • is as an efficiency boost

    そのために液冷パネルを製作しました

  • for today's air-conditioning and refrigeration systems.

    このようなものです

  • To do this, we've built fluid cooling panels,

    これらのパネルは 太陽熱温水器のような形状ですが

  • like the ones shown right here.

    まったく逆の働きをします エネルギーを使わず水を冷却します

  • These panels have a similar shape to solar water heaters,

    私たちの作った特殊な材料でです

  • except they do the opposite -- they cool the water, passively,

    このパネルは ほとんどの 冷却システムが備える

  • using our specialized material.

    凝縮器という部品と 組み合わせることができ

  • These panels can then be integrated with a component

    システムの基本的な効率を向上します

  • almost every cooling system has, called a condenser,

    私たちのスタートアップ企業 SkyCool Systemsは

  • to improve the system's underlying efficiency.

    カリフォルニア州デイビスで 実地試験を完了しました

  • Our start-up, SkyCool Systems,

    この時のデモでは

  • has recently completed a field trial in Davis, California, shown right here.

    冷却システムの効率を12パーセントも

  • In that demonstration,

    向上できたことを示しました

  • we showed that we could actually improve the efficiency

    1年か2年すると

  • of that cooling system as much as 12 percent in the field.

    空調と冷蔵システムの双方で 商用規模での試験運用が

  • Over the next year or two,

    開始されることに大変興奮しています

  • I'm super excited to see this go to its first commercial-scale pilots

    将来 このようなパネルを取り付けることで

  • in both the air conditioning and refrigeration space.

    ビル空調の冷却システムが高効率となり

  • In the future, we might be able to integrate these kinds of panels

    エネルギー消費を3分の2 減らせるかもしれません

  • with higher efficiency building cooling systems

    最終的には電力を全く必要としない

  • to reduce their energy usage by two-thirds.

    冷却システムを作れるかもしれないのです

  • And eventually, we might actually be able to build a cooling system

    それに向かう第1歩として

  • that requires no electricity input at all.

    スタンフォードの同僚と私は

  • As a first step towards that,

    技術を駆使して

  • my colleagues at Stanford and I

    気温より摂氏42度以上低い温度に 維持できることを実証しました

  • have shown that you could actually maintain

    ありがとう

  • something more than 42 degrees Celsius below the air temperature

    (拍手)

  • with better engineering.

    夏の暑い日に

  • Thank you.

    何かを氷点下にすることを想像してください

  • (Applause)

    冷却に対して私たちができるすべてに ワクワクしながら

  • So just imagine that --

    更にできる事があると考えていて

  • something that is below freezing on a hot summer's day.

    この研究が指し示す とても意義深い機会に

  • So, while I'm very excited about all we can do for cooling,

    科学者として惹かれます

  • and I think there's a lot yet to be done,

    宇宙の冷たい暗黒を 地球上のあらゆる

  • as a scientist, I'm also drawn to a more profound opportunity

    エネルギー関連工程の 効率向上に使うことができるのです

  • that I believe this work highlights.

    その一例として取り上げたいのは 太陽電池です

  • We can use the cold darkness of space

    太陽熱で温度が上昇し それに連れ効率が下がります

  • to improve the efficiency

    2015年には 意図的に微細構造を

  • of every energy-related process here on earth.

    太陽電池パネルの表面に装備することで 冷却効果を利用して

  • One such process I'd like to highlight are solar cells.

    エネルギーを使わず 太陽電池のセルを 低温に保てることを実証しました

  • They heat up under the sun

    太陽電池セルがより効率的に稼働できます

  • and become less efficient the hotter they are.

    私たちはこのような機会を模索しています

  • In 2015, we showed that with deliberate kinds of microstructures

    私たちは宇宙の冷たさを 水の節約や

  • on top of a solar cell,

    独立電源システムに役立てられないか

  • we could take better advantage of this cooling effect

    検討しているところです

  • to maintain a solar cell passively at a lower temperature.

    宇宙の冷たさから 直接 エネルギーを作れるかもしれないのです

  • This allows the cell to operate more efficiently.

    地球表面と冷たい宇宙の間には

  • We're probing these kinds of opportunities further.

    温度差が存在します

  • We're asking whether we can use the cold of space

    温度差は 少なくとも理論上

  • to help us with water conservation.

    熱機関の原動力として利用でき 電気を発生させられます

  • Or perhaps with off-grid scenarios.

    そうだとすると 夜間発電機器を作成し

  • Perhaps we could even directly generate power with this cold.

    太陽電池が機能しない間の 実用的な量の電力を

  • There's a large temperature difference between us here on earth

    作る事ができるのでしょうか?

  • and the cold of space.

    暗闇から光を作り出せるのでしょうか?

  • That difference, at least conceptually,

    この力の中核になるのは 私たちに身近な

  • could be used to drive something called a heat engine

    熱放射を管理できるかどうかです

  • to generate electricity.

    私たちは赤外線に包まれています

  • Could we then make a nighttime power-generation device

    もし赤外線を私たちの 思う通りに操れたら

  • that generates useful amounts of electricity

    日々 私たちに浸透している 熱とエネルギーの流れを

  • when solar cells don't work?

    根底から変えることができるのです

  • Could we generate light from darkness?

    この力は 宇宙の冷たい暗闇とともに

  • Central to this ability is being able to manage

    私たちに未来を見せてくれます

  • the thermal radiation that's a