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  • As a child growing up in Nigeria,

  • books sparked my earliest imagination,

  • but films, films transported me

  • to magical places with flying cars,

  • to infinite space with whole universes of worlds to discover.

  • And my journey of discovery has led to many places and possibilities,

  • all linked with ideas and imagination.

  • A decade and a half ago,

  • I moved from working in law and technology in New York

  • to financing, producing and distributing films

  • in Nairobi, Lagos and Johannesburg.

  • I've been privileged to see firsthand how in Africa,

  • film powerfully explores the marvelous and the mundane,

  • how it conveys infinite possibilities and fundamental truths.

  • Afrofuturist films like "Pumzi,"

  • Wanuri Kahiu's superb sci-fi flick,

  • paint brilliant pictures of Africa's future,

  • while Rungano Nyoni's "I Am Not A Witch"

  • and Akin Omotoso's "Vaya"

  • show us and catalogue our present.

  • These filmmakers offer nuanced snapshots of Africa's imagined and lived reality,

  • in contrast to some of the images of Africa that come from outside,

  • and the perspectives that accompany all of these images,

  • whether sympathetic or dismissive, shape or distort

  • how people see Africa.

  • And the truth is,

  • many people think Africa is screwed up.

  • Images play a big part of the reason why.

  • Many tropes about Africa persist from pictures,

  • pictures of famine in Ethiopia 30 years ago,

  • pictures of the Biafran war half a century ago.

  • But on a continent where the average age is 17,

  • these tragic events seem almost prehistoric.

  • Their images are far removed

  • from how people in Africa's many countries see themselves and their neighbors.

  • For them, these images do not represent their reality.

  • So what is Africa's reality,

  • or rather, which of Africa's many realities do we choose to focus on?

  • Do we accept Emmanuel Macron's imagination of Africa in 2017

  • as a place in which all women have seven or eight children?

  • Or do we instead rely on the UN's account

  • that only one of Africa's 54 countries has a fertility rate as high as seven?

  • Do we focus on the fact

  • that infant mortality and life expectancy in Africa today

  • is roughly comparable to the US a hundred years ago,

  • or do we focus on progress,

  • the fact that Africa has cut infant mortality in half

  • in the last four decades

  • and has raised life expectancy by 10 years since the year 2000?

  • These dueling perspectives

  • are all accurate.

  • Well, aside from Macron's. He's just wrong.

  • (Laughter)

  • But one version makes it easy to dismiss Africa as hopeless,

  • while the other fuels hope that a billion people

  • can continue to make progress towards prosperity.

  • The fact that Africans

  • do not have the luxury of turning their gaze elsewhere,

  • the fact that we must make progress

  • or live with the consequence of failure,

  • are the reason we must continue to tell our own stories

  • and show our own images,

  • with honesty and primarily to an African audience,

  • because the image that matters most

  • is the image of Africa in African imaginations.

  • Now, honesty requires that we acknowledge

  • that Africa is behind the rest of the world

  • and needs to move swiftly to catch up.

  • But thinking of a way forward,

  • I'd like us to engage in a thought exercise.

  • What if we could go back a hundred years,

  • say to the US in 1917,

  • but we could take with us all the modern ideas,

  • innovations, inventions that we have today?

  • What could we achieve with this knowledge?

  • How richly could we improve quality of life and living conditions for people?

  • How widely could we spread prosperity?

  • Imagine if a hundred years ago,

  • the education system had all the knowledge we have today,

  • including how best to teach.

  • And doctors and scientists knew all we do

  • about public health measures, surgery techniques,

  • DNA sequencing, cancer research and treatment?

  • If we had access then to modern semiconductors,

  • computers, mobile devices, the internet?

  • Just imagine.

  • If we did, we could take a quantum leap forward, couldn't we.

  • Well, Africa can take a leap of that magnitude today.

  • There's enough untapped innovation

  • to move Africa a century forward in living conditions

  • if the will and commitment is there.

  • This is not just a possibility; it's an imperative for Africa's future,

  • a future that will see Africa's population double

  • to two and a half billion people in just three decades,

  • a future that will see Africa have the world's largest workforce,

  • just as the idea of work itself is being radically reconsidered.

  • Now taking the leap forward isn't that far-fetched.

  • There are tons of examples that demonstrate the potential

  • for change in Africa.

  • Just 20 years ago,

  • Nigeria had fewer than half a million working phone lines.

  • Today it has a hundred million mobile phone subscriptions,

  • and this mobile miracle is mirrored in every African country.

  • There are over three quarters of a billion mobile phones in use in Africa today,

  • and this has spurred justified excitement about leapfrogging,

  • about bringing the sharing economy, artificial intelligence,

  • autonomous machines to Africa.

  • And this is all promising,

  • but we need to think about sequencing.

  • Forget putting the cart before the horse.

  • You can't put the self-driving car before the roads.

  • (Applause)

  • There's a whole infrastructural and logical layer to innovation

  • that we take for granted,

  • but we have to triage for Africa,

  • because some of the biggest infrastructure gaps

  • are for things that are so basic

  • that Westerners rarely have to think about them.

  • So let's explore this.

  • Imagine your internet access went off for a day,

  • and when it came back,

  • it only stayed on for three hours at a time,

  • with random 15-hour outages?

  • How would your life change?

  • Now replace internet access with electricity.

  • Think of your fridges, your TVs, your microwaves,

  • just sitting idly for days.

  • Now extend this nightmare to government offices,

  • to businesses, to schools,

  • to hospitals.

  • This, or worse,

  • is the type of access that hundreds of millions of Africans

  • have to electricity,

  • and to water,

  • and to healthcare,

  • and to sanitation,

  • and to education.

  • We must fix this.

  • We must fix this because ensuring widespread and affordable access

  • to decent infrastructure and services

  • isn't just low-hanging fruit:

  • it's fundamental to achieving the hundred-year leap.

  • And when we fix it,

  • we might find some unexpected benefits.

  • One unexpected benefit of the mobile miracle

  • was that it led to what is perhaps the greatest cultural resurgence

  • that Africa has seen in a generation:

  • the rebirth of African popular music.

  • For musicians like P-Square,

  • Bongo Maffin

  • and Wizkid,

  • mobile phones paved the path to local dominance

  • and global stardom.

  • And the impact isn't limited just to music.

  • It extends to film, too.

  • Beautiful, engaging films

  • like these stills of "Pumzi,"

  • "Vaya," and "I Am Not A Witch" show.

  • For while its external image might be dated,

  • Africa continues to evolve, as does African film.

  • Now, every now and again, the rest of the world catches on,

  • perhaps with Djo Munga's hard-hitting "Viva Riva!"

  • with Newton Aduaka's intense "Ezra,"

  • or with Abderrahmane Sissako's poetic "Timbuktu."

  • With mobile, Africans are discovering more and more of these films,

  • and what that means is that it really matters less in Kinshasa or Cotonou

  • what Cannes thinks of African film,

  • or if those opinions are informed or fair.

  • Who really cares what the "New York Times" thinks?

  • What matters is that Africans are validating African art and ideas,

  • both critically and commercially,

  • that they are watching what they want,

  • and that African filmmakers are connecting with their core audiences.

  • And this is important.

  • It's important because film can illuminate and inspire.

  • Film can bring visions of the future to us here in the present.

  • Films can serve as a conveyor belt for hope.

  • And film can change perspectives faster than we can build roads.

  • In just over a decade,

  • Nigeria's film industry, Africa's largest,

  • has taken the country's words and languages

  • into the vocabulary and imaginations of millions

  • in many other African countries.

  • It has torn down borders,

  • perhaps in the most effective way since the Berlin Conference

  • sowed linguistic and geographic division across Africa.

  • Film does speak a universal language,

  • and boy, Nigerian film speaks it loudly.

  • Making Africa's hundred-year leap

  • will require that Africans summon the creativity to generate ideas

  • and find the openness to accept and adapt ideas from anywhere else in the world

  • to solve our pervasive problems.

  • With focus on investment,

  • films can help drive that change in Africa's people,

  • a change that is necessary to make the hundred-year leap,

  • a change that will help create a prosperous Africa,

  • an Africa that is dramatically better than it is today.

  • Thank you.

  • Asante sana.

  • (Applause)

As a child growing up in Nigeria,

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TED】ダヨ・オグニェミ:アフリカの映像作家から見たアフリカの未来のビジョン(アフリカの映像作家から見たアフリカの未来のビジョン (【TED】Dayo Ogunyemi: Visions of Africa's future, from African filmmakers (Visions of Africa's future, from African filmmakers))

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    林宜悉 に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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