Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

自動翻訳
  • Good evening, welcome to New Orleans.

    こんばんは ニューオリンズへようこそ

  • I don't know if you knew this,

    知っていたかどうかは知らないが。

  • but you are sitting within 15 minutes of one of the largest rivers in the world:

    しかし、あなたは世界最大級の大河の一つである15分以内に座っています。

  • the Mississippi river.

    ミシシッピ川の

  • Old Man River, Big Muddy.

    オールドマンリバー、ビッグマディー

  • And it goes as far north as the state of Minnesota,

    そして、ミネソタ州と同じくらい北上しています。

  • as far east as the state of New York,

    ニューヨーク州と同じくらいの東側にある

  • as far west as Montana.

    モンタナの西の方まで

  • And 100 miles from here, river miles,

    そして、ここから100マイル先の川のマイル。

  • it empties its fresh water and sediments into the Gulf of Mexico.

    メキシコ湾に淡水と堆積物を空にしています。

  • That's the end of Geography 101.

    これで地理101は終わりです。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • Now we're going to go to what is in that water.

    さて、その水の中に何があるのかを見に行きましょう。

  • Besides the sediment, there are dissolved molecules, nitrogen and phosphorus.

    堆積物の他に、溶存分子、窒素、リンがあります。

  • And those, through a biological process,

    そして、それらは、生物学的なプロセスを経て

  • lead to the formation of areas called dead zones.

    デッドゾーンと呼ばれるエリアの形成につながる。

  • Now, dead zone is a quite ominous word

    さて、デッドゾーンはかなり不吉な言葉です。

  • if you're a fish or a crab.

    魚やカニであれば

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • Even a little worm in the sediments.

    堆積物の中の小さな虫でも

  • Which means that there's not enough oxygen

    つまり、十分な酸素がないということです。

  • for those animals to survive.

    それらの動物が生き延びるために

  • So, how does this happen?

    では、どうしてこうなるのか?

  • The nitrogen and the phosphorus

    窒素とリンの

  • stimulate the growth of microscopic plants called phytoplankton.

    植物プランクトンと呼ばれる微細な植物の成長を刺激します。

  • And small animals called zooplankton eat the phytoplankton,

    そして、動物プランクトンと呼ばれる小動物が植物プランクトンを食べています。

  • small fish eat the zooplankton, large fish eat the small fish

    小魚は動物プランクトンを食べ、大魚は小魚を食べる

  • and it goes on up into the food web.

    そしてそれは食物網の中へと進んでいきます。

  • The problem is that there's just too much nitrogen and phosphorus right now,

    問題は、今は窒素とリンが多すぎるということです。

  • too much phytoplankton falling to the bottom

    落ちこぼれの多い植物性プランクトン

  • and decomposed by bacteria that use up the oxygen.

    と酸素を使い切るバクテリアによって分解されます。

  • That's the biology.

    それが生物学です。

  • Now, you can't see it from the surface of the water,

    今は水面からは見えません。

  • you can't see it in satellite images,

    衛星画像ではわかりません。

  • so how do we know it's there?

    どうやってそこにあることがわかるの?

  • Well, a trawler can tell you,

    まあ、トロール船ならわかる。

  • when she puts her net over the side and drags for 20 minutes

    彼女がネットをサイドに寄せて20分間引きずっていた時に

  • and comes up empty,

    と空になる。

  • that she knows she's in the dead zone.

    彼女は死角にいることを知っている

  • And she has to go somewhere else.

    そして、彼女は他の場所に行かなければならない。

  • But where else do you go if this area is 8,000 square miles big?

    しかし、このエリアが80000平方マイルもあるとなると、他にどこに行けばいいのでしょうか?

  • About the size of the state of New Jersey.

    ニュージャージー州の大きさくらい。

  • Well, you either make a decision to go further,

    まあ、さらに先に進むかどうかの決断をするかだな。

  • without much economic return,

    大した経済的リターンもなく

  • or go back to the dock.

    またはドックに戻る。

  • As a scientist, I have access to high-tech equipment

    科学者として、私はハイテク機器にアクセスすることができます。

  • that we can put over the side of the research vessel,

    調査船の側面にかぶせることができるように

  • and it measures oxygen and many more things.

    と酸素を測定してくれたり、色々なものを測定してくれます。

  • We start at the Mississippi River,

    ミシシッピ川からスタート。

  • we crisscross the Gulf of Mexico all the way to Texas,

    メキシコ湾を横断して テキサスに向かっている

  • and even I sneak into Texas every now and then and test their waters.

    私も時々テキサスに潜入して 彼らの水域を試しています

  • And you can tell by the bottom oxygen --

    底部の酸素でわかる

  • you can draw a map of everything that's less than two,

    2以下のものは全部地図を描けばいいんだよ。

  • which is the magic number for when the fish start to leave the area.

    これは、魚が離脱し始めた時のマジックナンバーです。

  • I also dive in this dead zone.

    私もこのデッドゾーンに潜っています。

  • We have oxygen meters that we have to deploy offshore

    沖合に酸素計を配備しているので

  • that tell us continuous measurements of low oxygen or high oxygen.

    低酸素か高酸素かの連続測定を教えてくれます。

  • And when you get into the water, there's a lot of fish.

    そして水の中に入ると、魚がたくさんいます。

  • Tons of fish, all kinds of fish,

    大量の魚、あらゆる種類の魚。

  • including my buddy here, the barracuda that I saw one day.

    ここの相棒のバラクーダも含めて、ある日見たバラクーダ。

  • Everybody else swam this way and I went this way with my camera.

    他の人はみんなこの道を泳いでいて、私はカメラを持ってこの道を行きました。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • And then, down at 30 feet you start to see fewer fish.

    そして、30フィート下では魚が少なくなってきました。

  • And then you get to the bottom.

    そして、底辺にたどり着く。

  • And you don't see any fish.

    そして、魚を見ない。

  • There's no life on the platform, there's no life swimming around.

    ホームには生命体がいないし、泳ぎ回る生命体もいない。

  • And you know you're in the dead zone.

    そして、あなたは死角にいることを知っています。

  • So, what's the connection between the middle of the United States

    で、アメリカの真ん中のつながりは?

  • and the Gulf of Mexico?

    とメキシコ湾?

  • Well, most of the watershed is farmland.

    まあ、流域のほとんどが農地なんですけどね。

  • And in particular, corn-soybean rotation.

    そして、特にトウモロコシ・大豆のローテーション。

  • The nitrogen that is put in fertilizers and the phosphorus goes on the land

    肥料に入れた窒素とリンが土地に行くのは

  • and drains off into the Mississippi River

    とミシシッピ川に排水されています。

  • and ends up in the Gulf of Mexico.

    とメキシコ湾で終わる。

  • There's three times more nitrogen in the water

    水の中には3倍の窒素が含まれています

  • in the Mississippi now,

    今はミシシッピにいる

  • than there was in the 1950s.

    1950年代にあったものよりも

  • Three times.

    3回だ

  • And phosphorus has doubled.

    そしてリンが2倍になった。

  • And what that means is more phytoplankton and more sinking sails and lower oxygen.

    それが意味するのは植物プランクトンが増えて帆が沈み酸素量が減ることです。

  • This is not a natural feature of the Gulf; it's been caused by human activities.

    これは湾岸の自然の特徴ではなく、人間の活動によって引き起こされたものです。

  • The landscape is not what it used to be.

    景色は昔とは違います。

  • It used to be prairies and forests and prairie potholes

    かつては草原や森、草原の甌穴だった

  • and duck areas and all kinds of stuff.

    とか鴨のエリアとか色々あるんですよ。

  • But not anymore -- it's row crops.

    しかし、今はそうではありません。

  • And there are ways that we can address this type of agriculture

    そして、このような農業に対処する方法があります。

  • by using less fertilizer, maybe precision fertilizing.

    少ない肥料を使うことで、たぶん精密な肥料を与えることができます。

  • And trying some sustainable agriculture

    そして、いくつかの持続可能な農業を試してみてください。

  • such as perennial wheatgrass, which has much longer roots

    多年草のような、はるかに長い根を持っているコムギのような

  • than the six inches of a corn plant,

    トウモロコシの株の6インチよりも

  • that can keep the nitrogen on the soil and keep the soil from running off.

    土の上に窒素を残して、土を流出させないようにすることができます。

  • And how do we convince our neighbors to the north,

    そして、どうやって北の隣人を説得するのか。

  • maybe 1,000 miles away or more,

    1000マイル以上離れているかもしれない

  • that their activities are causing problems with water quality in the Gulf of Mexico?

    彼らの活動がメキシコ湾の水質問題を引き起こしていると?

  • First of all, we can take them to their own backyard.

    まずは、自分たちのバックヤードに連れて行くことができます。

  • If you want to go swimming in Wisconsin in the summer

    夏にウィスコンシンで泳ぎに行くなら

  • in your favorite watering hole,

    お気に入りの水飲み場で

  • you might find something like this

    こういったものがあるかもしれません

  • which looks like spilled green paint and smells like it,

    緑のペンキをこぼしたような匂いがする。

  • growing on the surface of the water.

    水面に生えている

  • This is a toxic blue-green algal bloom

    これは有毒な青緑色の藻類のブルームです。

  • and it is not good for you.

    と、体に良くないことを言っています。

  • Similarly, in Lake Erie, couple of summers ago

    同様に、数年前の夏、エリー湖では

  • there was hundreds of miles of this blue-green algae

    このアオコが何百マイルも続いていた

  • and the city of Toledo, Ohio, couldn't use it for their drinking water

    とオハイオ州トレド市では、飲料水に使用することができませんでした。

  • for several days on end.

    数日続けて

  • And if you watch the news,

    ニュースを見ていれば

  • you know that lots of communities are having trouble with drinking water.

    多くの地域が飲料水に困っていることを知っていますね。

  • I'm a scientist.

    私は科学者です。

  • I don't know if you could tell that.

    それがわかるかどうかはわかりませんが。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • And I do solid science, I publish my results,

    そして、私はしっかりとした科学をして、結果を発表しています。

  • my colleagues read them, I get citations of my work.

    同僚が読んでくれて、自分の仕事の引用をしてもらっています。

  • But I truly believe that, as a scientist,

    しかし、私は科学者として、本当にそう思っています。

  • using mostly federal funds to do the research,

    ほとんどが連邦政府の資金を使って研究をしています。

  • I owe it to the public,

    国民に借りがあるんだよ

  • to agency heads and congressional people

    機関長や議会関係者に

  • to share my knowledge with them

    私の知識を彼らと共有するために

  • so they can use it, hopefully to make better decisions

    それを利用して、より良い判断ができるようにするために

  • about our environmental policy.

    環境方針について

  • (Applause)

    (拍手)

  • Thank you.

    ありがとうございます。

  • (Applause)

    (拍手)

  • One of the ways that I was able to do this is I brought in the media.

    その方法の一つが、メディアを持ち込んだことです。

  • And Joby Warrick from the "Washington Post"

    ワシントン・ポストのジョビー・ウォーリックは

  • put this picture in an article

    この写真を記事にする

  • on the front page, Sunday morning, two inches above the fold.

    日曜の朝、一面の折り目の上の2インチに

  • That's a big deal.

    それは大変なことです。

  • And Senator John Breaux, from Louisiana,

    そして、ルイジアナ州からのジョン・ブリュー上院議員。

  • said, "Oh my gosh, that's what they think the Gulf of Mexico looks like?"

    "メキシコ湾がこんな風に見えると思っているのか?"

  • And I said, "Well, you know, there's the proof."

    "証拠があるから "と言ったんだ

  • And we've go to do something about it.

    そして、私たちはそれについて何かをするために行かなければなりません。

  • At the same time, Senator Olympia Snowe from Maine

    同時に、メイン州のオリンピア・スノウ上院議員が

  • was having trouble with harmful algal blooms in the Gulf of Maine.

    は、メイン湾での有害な藻類の開花に悩まされていました。

  • They joined forces -- it was bipartisan --

    彼らは超党派の力を合わせた

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • (Applause)

    (拍手)

  • And invited me to give congressional testimony,

    そして私を議会証言に招待してくれた

  • and I said, "Oh, all I've done is chase crabs around south Texas,

    と言うと、「ああ、私は南テキサスの周りでカニを追いかけているだけなんだ。

  • I don't know how to do that."

    どうすればいいのかわからない"

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • But I did it.

    でも、やってしまいました。

  • (Cheers)

    (乾杯)

  • And eventually, the bill passed.

    そして、最終的には法案が通った。

  • And it was called -- yeah, yay!

    その時の名前は...イェーイ!

  • It was called The Harmful Algal Bloom

    それは、有害な藻類のブルームと呼ばれていました。

  • and Hypoxia Research and Control Act of 1998.

    と1998年の低酸素研究制御法。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • (Applause)

    (拍手)

  • Thank you.

    ありがとうございます。

  • Which is why we call it the Snowe-Breaux Bill.

    だから「スノウ・ブレイド・ビル」と呼ばれています。

  • (Laughter)

    (笑)

  • The other thing is that we had a conference in 2001

    もう一つは、2001年の会議で

  • that was put on by the National Academy of Sciences

    全米科学アカデミーが開催した

  • that looked at fertilizers, nitrogen and poor water quality.

    肥料や窒素、水質の悪さを見た

  • Our plenary speaker was the former governor

    本会議のスピーカーは前知事

  • of the state of New Jersey.

    ニュージャージー州の

  • And she ...

    そして彼女は...

  • There was no thinking she wasn't serious when she peered at the audience,

    観客を見ていても、彼女が本気ではないとは思えない。

  • and I thought, "Surely she's looking at me."

    私は思ったの "きっと彼女は私を見ている "って

  • "You know, I'm really tired of this thing being called New Jersey.

    "ニュージャージー "と呼ばれるのは本当に疲れたよ

  • Pick another state, any state, I just don't want to hear it anymore."

    他の州を選んでください、どの州でも、私はもう聞きたくない。"

  • But she was able to move the action plan

    しかし、彼女は行動計画を動かすことができました。

  • across President George H.W. Bush's desk

    ブッシュ大統領の机の上

  • so that we had environmental goals

    環境目標があるように

  • and that we were working to solve them.

    と、それらを解決するために活動していたことがわかりました。

  • The Midwest does not feed the world.

    中西部は世界を養っていない

  • It feeds a lot of chickens, hogs, cattle

    それは鶏、豚、牛のたくさんの餌を与える

  • and it generates ethanol

    エタノールを生成します。

  • to put into our gasoline,

    ガソリンに入れるために

  • which is regulated by federal policy.

    連邦政府の政策によって規制されている。

  • We can do better than this.

    これ以上のことはできません。

  • We need to make decisions

    決断する必要がある

  • that make us less consumptive

    しょうひしゅくしゅくしゅくしゅくしゅくしゅくしゅくしゅくしゅ

  • and reduce our reliance on nitrogen.

    と窒素への依存度を下げることができます。

  • It's like a carbon footprint.

    カーボンフットプリントのようなものです。

  • But you can reduce your nitrogen footprint.

    しかし、あなたは窒素の足跡を減らすことができます。

  • I do it by not eating much meat --

    私は肉をあまり食べないことでそれをやっています。

  • I still like a little every now and then --

    今でもたまにちょこちょこ好きなんですけどね -- {fnCloisterBlackfe120fs30} 2016-04-06 (金) 00:00:00:00

  • not using corn oil,

    コーンオイルを使わない

  • driving a car that I can put nonethanol gas in

    ノンエタノールガスを入れられる車の運転

  • and get better gas mileage.

    そして、より良い燃費を得る。

  • Just things like that that can make a difference.

    そんな感じのことをしているだけで、違いが出てきます。

  • So I'm challenging, not just you,

    だから、あなただけでなく、私も挑戦しています。

  • but I challenge a lot of people, especially in the Midwest --

    しかし、私は多くの人に挑戦しています、特に中西部では...

  • think about how you're treating your land and how you can make a difference.

    自分の土地をどのように扱っているのか、そしてどのようにして変化をもたらすことができるのかを考えてみましょう。

  • So my steps are very small steps.

    だから、私の歩みはとても小さな歩みです。

  • To change the type of agriculture in the US

    アメリカの農業の種類を変えるために

  • is going to be many big steps.

    は大きな一歩がたくさん出てきそうです。

  • And it's going to take political and social will for that to happen.

    そのためには、政治的、社会的な意志が必要です。

  • But we can do it.

    しかし、私たちはそれを行うことができます。

  • I strongly believe we can translate the science,

    科学を翻訳できると強く信じています。

  • bridge it to policy and make a difference in our environment.

    政策に橋渡しし、環境に違いをもたらす。

  • We all want a clean environment.

    みんなクリーンな環境を求めています。

  • And we can work together to do this

    そして、私たちは一緒にこれを行うことができます。

  • so that we no longer have these dead zones in the Gulf of Mexico.

    メキシコ湾のデッドゾーンが無くなるように

  • Thank you.

    ありがとうございます。

  • (Applause)

    (拍手)

Good evening, welcome to New Orleans.

こんばんは ニューオリンズへようこそ

字幕と単語
自動翻訳

動画の操作 ここで「動画」の調整と「字幕」の表示を設定することができます

B1 中級 日本語 TED 窒素 プランクトン 酸素 メキシコ リン

TED】ナンシー・ラバレ。メキシコ湾の「デッドゾーン」(メキシコ湾の「デッドゾーン」|ナンシー・ラバレ

  • 329 26
    Zenn に公開 2018 年 05 月 10 日
動画の中の単語