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  • Hi, everybody, and welcome back to EnglishClass101.com's youtube channel.

  • My name is Alisha, and today we're going to talk about basic adjectives comparisons.

  • So today I'm going to explain how to make a basic adjective comparison, we'll talk about

  • short adjectives, long adjectives, and some sample question patterns, and some sample

  • statement patterns you can use with this grammar.

  • So, let's get started.

  • Okay, so first I want to talk about short adjectives.

  • So short adjectives are adjectives that are one to two syllables long, a syllable is the

  • beat of a word.

  • So, for example, the word small has one beat, small.

  • The word "fast" has one beat, fast.

  • "Pretty" has two syllables, pretty; so a syllable is like the beat of a word.

  • So for short adjectives, adjectives which have one to two syllables, to make the adjectives

  • comparative form, we use the adjective plus ER, this is how we make the adjective form,

  • the comparative form of the adjective.

  • However, please note if the adjective ends in a Y, like pretty, the form is still the

  • same, it's the adjective plus an ER sound, but the spelling does change, so if your adjective

  • ends in a Y, please drop the Y from the end of the adjective and add IER, instead of only

  • ER.

  • This is special, it's only for adjectives which end in Y, so please be careful with

  • spelling.

  • In pronunciation, it doesn't make that big of a difference, but just please note it when

  • you're writing things.

  • Okay, so for example, with the three adjectives I just mentioned, small, fast, and pretty,

  • we just add ER to the end.

  • Small becomes smaller, fast becomes "faster," pretty becomes "prettier" here.

  • So this is how we make the adjective the comparative form of an adjective, a short adjective, one

  • to two syllables.

  • Okay, let's talk about how to make the comparative form of an adjective with three or more syllables.

  • So, for a long adjective with three plus syllables, the adjective does not change, the adjective

  • stays the same, however, we have to add more or "less" before the adjective.

  • So for example, with the adjective "beautiful," we can add "more" or "less" in front of the

  • adjective, before the adjective, to make the comparative form.

  • The same thing applies to the adjective "expensive"; so expensive also gets "more" or "less" before

  • the adjective, and this makes the comparative form.

  • So please remember there is no need to change the adjective if the adjective is more than

  • three syllables.

  • If it's fewer than three syllables, please make sure to use this pattern, the short adjective

  • pattern.

  • However there are a few adjectives which have an irregular form, an irregular comparative

  • form, a few of them are up here on the board.

  • So, some irregular adjectives are "good," "bad," and "fun".

  • Good does not become good-er or more good.

  • Good in fact changes to "better," so please be careful here.

  • "Good" becomes "better".

  • Bad becomes "worse", we do not use batter or more bad, please use "worse".

  • Bad becomes worse in the comparative form.

  • For "fun," the long adjective rule applies to fun, so please use "more" or "less" in

  • front of the adjective "fun" to make the comparative form.

  • Okay, so now that we know how to make a comparison, let's talk about a few different patterns

  • that you can use to explain a comparison, to make a comparative statement, or to make

  • a question, to make a question asking someone to compare two or more items.

  • So, first, to make a positive comparison, we'll say A is plus the comparative adjective,

  • then B. So for example I could say, let's see...

  • This book is more expensive than that book.

  • I've used the comparative adjective form here, to use a short adjective, I could say, let's

  • see...

  • That shop is smaller than this shop.

  • So just make sure to use the comparative form here.

  • In the negative comparison, however, you'll see it's slightly different, when you make

  • a negative comparison, you'll say A is not as, plus the regular adjective, there's no

  • change to the adjective in this sentence pattern, as B.

  • So, for example, A is not as big as B. A is not as expensive as B. So please be careful,

  • when you're making a negative comparison, you're not changing the adjective, the adjective

  • will remain the same, there's no need to update this part, so please be careful here.

  • Finally, I want to talk about a few questions, so these are a few question patterns that

  • you can use along with your comparatives.

  • So for example, which is, plus your comparative adjective, A or B?

  • So, for example, which is more expensive A or B?

  • Or, which is bigger, A or B?

  • Here you need to use the comparative form of the adjective in your question.

  • The same thing here, is A or B, comparative adjective.

  • So, is A or B bigger?

  • Is A or B more expensive?

  • You can use both of these patterns to ask simple information questions using the comparative

  • form, so let's try this out in a few example sentences.

  • Okay.

  • So the first sentence that I have, My brother is _____ than me.

  • I want to use the adjective "funny" here.

  • So funny has two syllables, funny, it also ends in Y, so I know I need to apply this

  • rule I just talked about here.

  • So the correct answer is funnier.

  • My brother is funnier than me.

  • This is the correct answer.

  • Okay!

  • Let's go to this one, Thai food is ______ than French food.

  • For this one, I want to use the adjective spicy.

  • So spicy, just like funny, ends in Y and it's a short adjective, so again, I need to apply

  • this rule here.

  • So, Thai food is spicier then French food is the right answer for this one.

  • Okay, next I have, a new house is more, so this is a big hint word for me, more, ______

  • than a new car.

  • I want to use the adjective "expensive," I know that expensive is a long adjective, so

  • this is the rule that applies, this means there's no change to the adjective.

  • A new house is more expensive than a new car is the correct sentence here.

  • Okay, let's go to the next one, French fries are ______ than onion rings.

  • French fries are what?

  • So I want to use the irregular one, the irregular adjectives "good."

  • French fries are, good becomes better in the adjective comparison form, so French fries

  • are better than onion rings is the example sentence.

  • Okay, so let's go to next, Batman is ______ than Superman.

  • Alright!

  • So for this one, I want to use the adjective "exciting," so exciting has three syllables,

  • I know I need to use the long adjective rule here.

  • So, Batman is more exciting than Superman is the correct answer for this one.

  • Okay!

  • So let's go to the next one, shopping for clothes is not as _____ as shopping for food.

  • So we learned here there's no change to the adjective when I'm making a negative sentence.

  • So I want to use the adjective "fun" here.

  • Sun therefore does not change in this sentence.

  • So, shopping for clothes is not as fun as shopping for food.

  • Okay, the final example sentence, listening to music is more _____ than driving a car.

  • So here, again, I have this hint word, more, so that means that it's probably going to

  • be a long adjective, okay.

  • I want to use the adjectiverelaxingin this sentence.

  • So, more relaxing than driving a car.

  • Alright!

  • So these are a few examples of ways that you can use the adjective comparative form to

  • make a lot of different sentences, to make positive statements, to make negative statements,

  • and you can try to make a few questions with this grammar as well.

  • Just, if you, if you're not sure which adjective form to use, just think about the number of

  • syllables in the adjective you'd like to apply, and you can try using the rule we talked about

  • on this side of the board.

  • So I hope that you enjoyed this lesson!

  • If you have any questions or comments, please be sure to let us know in the comment box below this video.

  • If you haven't already, please be sure to give this video a thumbs up and subscribe to our channel, too.

  • You can also check us out at EnglishClass101.com.

  • Thanks very much for watching, and we'll see you again soon.

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形容詞の比較 - 英文法を学ぶ (Basic Adjective Comparisons - Learn English Grammar)

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    Samuel に公開 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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