Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • So I'm here to talk to you about the walkable city.

    翻訳: Misaki Sato 校正: Eriko T

  • What is the walkable city?

    歩きやすい都市について お話ししたいと思います

  • Well, for want of a better definition,

    歩きやすい都市とは何でしょうか?

  • it's a city in which the car is an optional instrument of freedom,

    より分かりやすく定義すると

  • rather than a prosthetic device.

    自動車が必要不可欠というより

  • And I'd like to talk about why we need the walkable city,

    選択肢の1つであるような 都市のことです

  • and I'd like to talk about how to do the walkable city.

    そこで 歩きやすい都市の 必要性について説明し

  • Most of the talks I give these days are about why we need it,

    その実現方法について お話ししたいと思います

  • but you guys are smart.

    最近お話ししているのはほとんどが その必要性についてですが

  • And also I gave that talk exactly a month ago,

    皆さんは もうご存知のことでしょうし

  • and you can see it at TED.com.

    ちょうど1か月前に行ったトークを

  • So today I want to talk about how to do it.

    TED.comでご覧になれますから

  • In a lot of time thinking about this,

    今日はその実現方法について お話しします

  • I've come up with what I call the general theory of walkability.

    この事を考え続けて

  • A bit of a pretentious term, it's a little tongue-in-cheek,

    歩きやすさについての 一般論を思いつきました

  • but it's something I've thought about for a long time,

    口幅ったい言い方ですし 少々もったいぶった感じですが

  • and I'd like to share what I think I've figured out.

    私が長い間温めてきて

  • In the American city, the typical American city --

    理解したことを紹介したいと思います

  • the typical American city is not Washington, DC,

    アメリカの都市は― 典型的な都市ということですが

  • or New York, or San Francisco;

    ワシントンD.C.でもなく

  • it's Grand Rapids or Cedar Rapids or Memphis --

    ニューヨークでも サンフランシスコでもありません

  • in the typical American city in which most people own cars

    グランドラピッズやセダーラピッズや メンフィスといった都市です

  • and the temptation is to drive them all the time,

    この典型的なアメリカの都市では ほとんどの人が車を持ち

  • if you're going to get them to walk, then you have to offer a walk

    常に車に乗っていたい と思うものです

  • that's as good as a drive or better.

    ですから そこで歩いてもらうには 歩くことが運転と同じくらい

  • What does that mean?

    魅力的だと思ってもらう 必要があります

  • It means you need to offer four things simultaneously:

    これはどういうことでしょう?

  • there needs to be a proper reason to walk,

    4点セットを同時に 提供する必要があるということです

  • the walk has to be safe and feel safe,

    歩く理由

  • the walk has to be comfortable

    安全・安心感があること

  • and the walk has to be interesting.

    快適に歩けること

  • You need to do all four of these things simultaneously,

    楽しいことです

  • and that's the structure of my talk today,

    この4つが同時に必要です

  • to take you through each of those.

    これが本日のトークの柱です

  • The reason to walk is a story I learned from my mentors,

    それぞれ お話ししていきますね

  • Andrés Duany and Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk,

    私はメンターたちから 歩く理由を学びました

  • the founders of the New Urbanism movement.

    アンドレス・デュアニーと エリザベス・プラター・ザイバーグで

  • And I should say half the slides and half of my talk today

    ニューアーバニズム運動の創始者です

  • I learned from them.

    本日の内容の半分は

  • It's the story of planning,

    この2人から学んだことです

  • the story of the formation of the planning profession.

    これは都市計画の話

  • When in the 19th century people were choking

    職業としてのシティプランナーの 成立についてです

  • from the soot of the dark, satanic mills,

    19世紀の人々はおぞましい工場から 排出される真っ黒なすすに

  • the planners said, hey, let's move the housing away from the mills.

    悩まされていました

  • And lifespans increased immediately, dramatically,

    そこで プランナーは住居と工場を 引き離せばいいと考え

  • and we like to say

    するとほどなく人々の寿命が 劇的に向上しました

  • the planners have been trying to repeat that experience ever since.

    それ以来プランナーは

  • So there's the onset of what we call Euclidean zoning,

    この体験を再現しようとしてきたと言っても 過言ではないでしょう

  • the separation of the landscape into large areas of single use.

    私たちがユークリッド・ゾーニングと 呼んでいるものが始まり

  • And typically when I arrive in a city to do a plan,

    土地を単一目的の 広大な敷地に分断していきました

  • a plan like this already awaits me on the property that I'm looking at.

    私が都市計画を行うため 現地に到着すると

  • And all a plan like this guarantees

    土地がこういったデザインに なっていることが多いのですが

  • is that you will not have a walkable city,

    こうした計画では 間違いなく

  • because nothing is located near anything else.

    歩きやすい都市にはならないでしょう

  • The alternative, of course, is our most walkable city,

    何も近くにないからです

  • and I like to say, you know, this is a Rothko,

    その代わりに― ご存知の 最も歩きやすい都市 マンハッタンです

  • and this is a Seurat.

    先ほどの地図はロスコーの絵のようですが

  • It's just a different way -- he was the pointilist --

    こちらは点描画家の

  • it's a different way of making places.

    スーラの絵のようです

  • And even this map of Manhattan is a bit misleading

    それぞれの手法で街が作られていますね

  • because the red color is uses that are mixed vertically.

    このマンハッタンの地図も 少し紛らわしいですね

  • So this is the big story of the New Urbanists --

    赤色が一面に塗られていますから

  • to acknowledge that there are only two ways

    これはニューアーバニストの壮大な物語―

  • that have been tested by the thousands

    コミュニティを構築するため 歴史を通じて世界中で

  • to build communities, in the world and throughout history.

    何千回も試されてきた方法は

  • One is the traditional neighborhood.

    2通りだという話です

  • You see here several neighborhoods of Newburyport, Massachusetts,

    そのひとつがこんな伝統的な界隈です

  • which is defined as being compact and being diverse --

    これは マサチューセッツ州 ニューベリーポートの界隈です

  • places to live, work, shop, recreate, get educated --

    コンパクトで多様性に満ちていて

  • all within walking distance.

    住居や職場、店舗や 娯楽施設、学校は

  • And it's defined as being walkable.

    徒歩圏内にあり

  • There are lots of small streets.

    歩きやすいように街が設計されています

  • Each one is comfortable to walk on.

    細い通りがいくつもあって

  • And we contrast that to the other way,

    どれも歩きやすい道です

  • an invention that happened after the Second World War,

    この対照例として挙げるのは

  • suburban sprawl,

    第二次世界大戦後に起こった 郊外地域の

  • clearly not compact, clearly not diverse, and it's not walkable,

    スプロール化(無秩序な拡大)です

  • because so few of the streets connect,

    どう見てもコンパクトではなく 多様性に欠け 歩きづらい

  • that those streets that do connect become overburdened,

    つながっている通りが少なく

  • and you wouldn't let your kid out on them.

    つながった通りは渋滞し

  • And I want to thank Alex Maclean, the aerial photographer,

    子どもを歩かせられるような 道ではありません

  • for many of these beautiful pictures that I'm showing you today.

    航空写真家のアレックス・マクリーンが 本日お見せする

  • So it's fun to break sprawl down into its constituent parts.

    美しい航空写真を数多く 提供してくれました

  • It's so easy to understand,

    スプロール化した都市の パーツを見てみるのは面白いですよ

  • the places where you only live, the places where you only work,

    見分けるのは非常に簡単です

  • the places where you only shop,

    住むだけのための場所 働くためだけの場所

  • and our super-sized public institutions.

    買い物のためだけの場所

  • Schools get bigger and bigger,

    巨大な公共施設

  • and therefore, further and further from each other.

    学校はどんどん大きくなり

  • And the ratio of the size of the parking lot

    ますますお互いから 離れていくようになります

  • to the size of the school

    駐車場と学校の建物の

  • tells you all you need to know,

    大きさの比率を見ると

  • which is that no child has ever walked to this school,

    徒歩で登校できない

  • no child will ever walk to this school.

    ということは一目瞭然です

  • The seniors and juniors are driving the freshmen and the sophomores,

    歩いて登校している子など いないでしょう

  • and of course we have the crash statistics to prove it.

    上級生が下級生を 自動車に乗せ登校するので

  • And then the super-sizing of our other civic institutions

    それが交通事故の統計に表れます

  • like playing fields --

    そして巨大化した公共施設

  • it's wonderful that Westin in the Ft. Lauderdale area

    運動場などですが

  • has eight soccer fields and eight baseball diamonds

    フォートローダーデール地区の ウェスティンには

  • and 20 tennis courts,

    サッカー場が8面、野球場が8面

  • but look at the road that takes you to that location,

    テニスコートが20面もありますが

  • and would you let your child bike on it?

    そこへ続く道路に注目してください

  • And this is why we have the soccer mom now.

    子どもを自転車で 行かせたりしますか?

  • When I was young, I had one soccer field,

    車で送迎する サッカーマムが必要なわけです

  • one baseball diamond and one tennis court,

    私が子供の頃はサッカー場と野球場と

  • but I could walk to it, because it was in my neighborhood.

    テニスコートが1面ずつだけでしたが

  • Then the final part of sprawl that everyone forgot to count:

    私は歩いていくことができました 近所にあったからです

  • if you're going to separate everything from everything else

    つい忘れがちなスプロールの最終段階は

  • and reconnect it only with automotive infrastructure,

    何もかもお互いから離してしまって

  • then this is what your landscape begins to look like.

    それらを自動車道路だけでつなげると

  • The main message here is:

    このような風景に なってしまうということです

  • if you want to have a walkable city, you can't start with the sprawl model.

    ここでいちばん言いたいことは

  • you need the bones of an urban model.

    歩きやすい都市にしたければ スプロールモデルは使えないことです

  • This is the outcome of that form of design,

    都市モデルには 骨格が必要です

  • as is this.

    これがその通りに設計した結果です

  • And this is something that a lot of Americans want.

    このとおりです

  • But we have to understand it's a two-part American dream.

    これがアメリカ人の多くが 望むものなのです

  • If you're dreaming for this,

    しかしアメリカンドリームには 2つの面があります

  • you're also going to be dreaming of this, often to absurd extremes,

    もし これを夢見て

  • when we build our landscape to accommodate cars first.

    自動車優先の風景を作り上げると

  • And the experience of being in these places --

    その夢は馬鹿げた極端な風景を 生み出すことが多いのです

  • (Laughter)

    こういう場所に行ってみると [この信号は青になりません]

  • This is not Photoshopped.

    (笑)

  • Walter Kulash took this slide.

    画像の加工はしていませんよ

  • It's in Panama City.

    ウォルター・クラシュが このスライドを撮りました

  • This is a real place.

    これは パナマシティにある

  • And being a driver can be a bit of a nuisance,

    実在する場所です

  • and being a pedestrian can be a bit of a nuisance

    スムーズな運転は難しく

  • in these places.

    歩くのもなかなか厄介です

  • This is a slide that epidemiologists have been showing for some time now,

    こんなところではね

  • (Laughter)

    次は疫学研究でよく目にするスライドですが

  • The fact that we have a society where you drive to the parking lot

    (笑)

  • to take the escalator to the treadmill

    私たちの社会では スポーツジムまで車で行き

  • shows that we're doing something wrong.

    入り口にはエスカレーター

  • But we know how to do it better.

    何かが間違っています

  • Here are the two models contrasted.

    でも 改善策は分かっています

  • I show this slide,

    対照的なモデルが2つあります

  • which has been a formative document of the New Urbanism now

    30年ぐらい

  • for almost 30 years,

    ニューアーバニズムの教科書的なものだった

  • to show that sprawl and the traditional neighborhood contain the same things.

    このスライドをお見せします

  • It's just how big are they,

    スプロールと伝統的な界隈は 色分けされた 同じ建物要素を含んでいることがわかります

  • how close are they to each other,

    その違いは大きさと

  • how are they interspersed together

    お互いの距離

  • and do you have a street network, rather than a cul-de-sac

    分散の仕方であり

  • or a collector system of streets?

    袋小路よりも 道路のネットワークが多いか

  • So when we look at a downtown area,

    通りが密集しているかの違いです

  • at a place that has a hope of being walkable,

    あるダウンタウンの地域を

  • and mostly that's our downtowns in America's cities

    もっと歩きやすい地域へと 改善することを考えるとき

  • and towns and villages,

    アメリカの都市や 町や村の

  • we look at them and say we want the proper balance of uses.

    大部分のダウンタウンにあてはまりますが

  • So what is missing or underrepresented?

    用途のバランスを適正にしましょうという 話を始めます

  • And again, in the typical American cities in which most Americans live,

    欠けたり不足しているのものは 何でしょうか?

  • it is housing that is lacking.

    アメリカ人の大部分が住んでいる 典型的な都市部では

  • The jobs-to-housing balance is off.

    不足しているのは住宅であり

  • And you find that when you bring housing back,

    職と住のバランスが偏っています

  • these other things start to come back too,

    住居を取り戻してやると

  • and housing is usually first among those things.

    他の建物も戻ってきますので

  • And, of course, the thing that shows up last and eventually

    まず住居の配置ありきなのです

  • is the schools,

    そしてもちろん 最終的には

  • because the people have to move in,

    学校が戻ってきます

  • the young pioneers have to move in, get older, have kids

    それは人が引っ越してくると

  • and fight, and then the schools get pretty good eventually.

    若者が成長して子供を持つようになり

  • The other part of this part,

    競争が起きて 学校がよくなっていきます

  • the useful city part,

    そしてその他の部分について

  • is transit,

    都市部の便利さ

  • and you can have a perfectly walkable neighborhood without it.

    公共交通機関です

  • But perfectly walkable cities require transit,

    なくても完璧に歩きやすい地域の整備は できますが

  • because if you don't have access to the whole city as a pedestrian,

    都市を完璧に歩きやすくするためには 交通機関が必要です

  • then you get a car,

    歩行者として町全体にアクセスできないと

  • and if you get a car,

    自動車に乗ることになり

  • the city begins to reshape itself around your needs,

    そして 自動車が増えると

  • and the streets get wider and the parking lots get bigger

    都市はそのニーズに応じて 再び形を変え

  • and you no longer have a walkable city.

    道路が広くなり 駐車場が広がり

  • So transit is essential.

    もはや歩きやすい都市ではなくなります

  • But every transit experience, every transit trip,

    交通機関は不可欠です

  • begins or ends as a walk,

    どんな交通機関を使うにしても

  • and so we have to remember to build walkability around our transit stations.

    最初と最後は徒歩です

  • Next category, the biggest one, is the safe walk.

    ですから駅の周囲を 歩きやすくする必要があります

  • It's what most walkability experts talk about.

    次のカテゴリーは一番大切で 安全に歩けることです

  • It is essential, but alone not enough to get people to walk.

    これが歩きやすさには不可欠ですが

  • And there are so many moving parts that add up to a walkable city.

    それだけでは十分ではありません

  • The first is block size.

    歩きやすい都市をつくる 多くの要素があります

  • This is Portland, Oregon,

    まずは1ブロックの大きさです

  • famously 200-foot blocks, famously walkable.

    こちらはオレゴン州ポートランドで

  • This is Salt Lake City,

    1ブロックが60メートルで 歩きやすいことで有名です

  • famously 600-foot blocks,

    こちらはソルトレークシティです

  • famously unwalkable.

    1ブロックが200メートルあって

  • If you look at the two, it's almost like two different planets,

    歩きにくいことで知られています

  • but these places were both built by humans

    比べてみると まるで別の惑星のようですが

  • and in fact, the story is that when you have a 200-foot block city,

    どちらも人類が作った場所です

  • you can have a two-lane city,

    ブロックが60メートルの都市ならば

  • or a two-to-four lane city,

    2車線あるいは

  • and a 600-foot block city is a six-lane city, and that's a problem.

    2車線から4車線の都市になります

  • These are the crash statistics.

    ブロックが200メートルの都市は 6車線でこれは問題です

  • When you double the block size --

    交通事故の統計によると

  • this was a study of 24 California cities --

    ブロックサイズが倍になると

  • when you double the block size,

    カリフォルニアの 24都市での研究ですが―

  • you almost quadruple the number of fatal accidents

    ブロックサイズが倍になると

  • on non-highway streets.

    一般道における死亡事故が

  • So how many lanes do we have?

    約4倍になります

  • This is where I'm going to tell you what I tell every audience I meet,

    では 何車線がいいのでしょうか?

  • which is to remind you about induced demand.

    ここからは講演のたびに お話しすることなんですが

  • Induced demand applies both to highways and to city streets.

    「需要が誘発されること」について 考えてもらうことにしています

  • And induced demand tells us that when we widen the streets

    「誘発需要」現象は幹線道路にも 一般道にも当てはまります

  • to accept the congestion that we're anticipating,

    誘発された需要から分かるのは

  • or the additional trips that we're anticipating

    予期される交通渋滞に対応するために 道路を広げたり

  • in congested systems, it is principally that congestion

    渋滞のために迂回するといった ことを予測する

  • that is constraining demand,

    混雑に対応するシステム自体が

  • and so that the widening comes,

    需要を刺激しており

  • and there are all of these latent trips that are ready to happen.

    道路が拡大されるようになり

  • People move further from work

    それにつれてまた新たに迂回が起こります

  • and make other choices about when they commute,

    人々は更に職場から遠ざかり

  • and those lanes fill up very quickly with traffic,

    通勤時間帯を変えたりして

  • so we widen the street again, and they fill up again.

    これらの車道が 瞬く間に渋滞するようになり

  • And we've learned that in congested systems,

    再び道路を広げれば また満杯になります

  • we cannot satisfy the automobile.

    これが渋滞した システムから学んだことです

  • This is from Newsweek Magazine -- hardly an esoteric publication:

    自動車を優先した都市作りは不可能です

  • "Today's engineers acknowledge

    ニューズウィーク誌からです 深遠な記事などみかけない雑誌ですが

  • that building new roads usually makes traffic worse."

    「こんにちエンジニアは

  • My response to reading this was, may I please meet some of these engineers,

    新たな道路の建設で 交通渋滞が悪化すると認めている」

  • because these are not the ones that I --

    これを読んで私は 「このエンジニアに会いたい」と思いました

  • there are great exceptions that I'm working with now --

    ただのエンジニアではないなと思ったのです

  • but these are not the engineers one typically meets working in a city,

    私が実際知っている 素晴らしい技術者は例外で

  • where they say, "Oh, that road is too crowded, we need to add a lane."

    都市計画でお目にかかる ごく一般的なエンジニアは

  • So you add a lane, and the traffic comes,

    「交通渋滞するから 車線を増やそう」 と考えるものです

  • and they say, "See, I told you we needed that lane."

    車線を増やすと渋滞するようになり

  • This applies both to highways and to city streets if they're congested.

    「ほら 車線が必要だったでしょ」と 言うようなね

  • But the amazing thing about most American cities that I work in,

    これは幹線道路や一般道 どちらの渋滞にもあてはまります

  • the more typical cities,

    私が仕事をしている アメリカの都市については不思議なことに

  • is that they have a lot of streets that are actually oversized

    典型的な都市の多くには

  • for the congestion they're currently experiencing.

    現在直面している渋滞に比べて

  • This was the case in Oklahoma City,

    広すぎるような道路が多くあります

  • when the mayor came running to me, very upset,

    オクラホマシティの例ですが

  • because they were named in Prevention Magazine

    市長があわてて連絡をして来ました

  • the worst city for pedestrians in the entire country.

    「プリベンション」誌で

  • Now that can't possibly be true,

    歩行者にとって最悪な町だと こき下ろされたからです

  • but it certainly is enough to make a mayor do something about it.

    そんなはずはありませんが

  • We did a walkability study,

    市長としては 何とかしなければなりません

  • and what we found, looking at the car counts on the street --

    まず歩きやすさを調査しました

  • these are 3,000-, 4,000-, 7,000-car counts

    通行する自動車の数を数えて 分かったことは

  • and we know that two lanes can handle 10,000 cars per day.

    3千、4千、7千台 だったのですが