Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • Roy Price is a man that most of you have probably never heard about,

    翻訳: Kazunori Akashi 校正: Misaki Sato

  • even though he may have been responsible

    ロイ・プライスを知っている人は ほとんどいないでしょう

  • for 22 somewhat mediocre minutes of your life on April 19, 2013.

    でも彼こそ 2013年4月19日に

  • He may have also been responsible for 22 very entertaining minutes,

    22分間 みなさんを 退屈させたであろう張本人です

  • but not very many of you.

    その時間が「楽しかった」と言う人も いるかもしれませんが

  • And all of that goes back to a decision

    それほど多くはないでしょう

  • that Roy had to make about three years ago.

    すべては その3年前に

  • So you see, Roy Price is a senior executive with Amazon Studios.

    ロイが下した ある決定にさかのぼります

  • That's the TV production company of Amazon.

    ロイ・プライスが役員を務めるのは アマゾン・スタジオ すなわち

  • He's 47 years old, slim, spiky hair,

    Amazonのテレビ制作会社です

  • describes himself on Twitter as "movies, TV, technology, tacos."

    彼は すらっとして 髪を逆立てた 47歳

  • And Roy Price has a very responsible job, because it's his responsibility

    Twitterの自己紹介は「映画 テレビ テクノロジーとタコス 好き」です

  • to pick the shows, the original content that Amazon is going to make.

    Amazonが制作するオリジナル番組を 選ぶのが彼の仕事ですから

  • And of course that's a highly competitive space.

    責任は重大です

  • I mean, there are so many TV shows already out there,

    競争も激しい業界です

  • that Roy can't just choose any show.

    すでに大量のテレビ番組があって

  • He has to find shows that are really, really great.

    何を選んでもいいわけではありません

  • So in other words, he has to find shows

    本当にすごい番組を 見出さなければならないんです

  • that are on the very right end of this curve here.

    つまり このグラフの右端に来るような

  • So this curve here is the rating distribution

    番組を見つける必要があります

  • of about 2,500 TV shows on the website IMDB,

    このグラフは IMDbというサイトに

  • and the rating goes from one to 10,

    掲載されている 約2,500番組の評価の分布です

  • and the height here shows you how many shows get that rating.

    評価は 1から10まで

  • So if your show gets a rating of nine points or higher, that's a winner.

    縦軸は その評価を得た番組の数です

  • Then you have a top two percent show.

    もし 選んだ番組が9点以上の 評価を得れば 成功と言えます

  • That's shows like "Breaking Bad," "Game of Thrones," "The Wire,"

    上位2%に入りますから

  • so all of these shows that are addictive,

    『ブレイキング・バッド』や 『ゲーム・オブ・スローンズ』『ザ・ワイヤー』が

  • whereafter you've watched a season, your brain is basically like,

    それに当たる番組で どれもハマりやすく

  • "Where can I get more of these episodes?"

    1シーズン見たら 「どこで もっと見られる?」と

  • That kind of show.

    脳が欲してしまうような

  • On the left side, just for clarity, here on that end,

    番組です

  • you have a show called "Toddlers and Tiaras" --

    一応 説明すると 左端には

  • (Laughter)

    美少女コンテスト・リアリティー番組 『Toddlers & Tiaras』が来ます

  • -- which should tell you enough

    (笑)

  • about what's going on on that end of the curve.

    これで グラフの左端が

  • Now, Roy Price is not worried about getting on the left end of the curve,

    何を表しているか よくわかるはずです

  • because I think you would have to have some serious brainpower

    ただロイ・プライスは 左端のことは 心配していません

  • to undercut "Toddlers and Tiaras."

    『Toddlers & Tiaras』を下回るには

  • So what he's worried about is this middle bulge here,

    かなりの知恵が必要ですから

  • the bulge of average TV,

    だから 彼が心配するのは グラフのピーク付近です

  • you know, those shows that aren't really good or really bad,

    これは平均的な番組の数で

  • they don't really get you excited.

    可もなく不可もなく 特に見たいとも思わない

  • So he needs to make sure that he's really on the right end of this.

    番組なんです

  • So the pressure is on,

    だから 何としてもグラフの右端に 行かなくてはなりません

  • and of course it's also the first time

    プレッシャーは大きい上に

  • that Amazon is even doing something like this,

    Amazonが こういう事業を

  • so Roy Price does not want to take any chances.

    手がけるのは初めてですから

  • He wants to engineer success.

    ロイ・プライスは 賭けに出る気はありません

  • He needs a guaranteed success,

    絶対 成功する方法を考えます

  • and so what he does is, he holds a competition.

    確実に成功するために

  • So he takes a bunch of ideas for TV shows,

    コンテストを開きます

  • and from those ideas, through an evaluation,

    番組の企画をたくさん集めて

  • they select eight candidates for TV shows,

    それぞれ評価し その中から

  • and then he just makes the first episode of each one of these shows

    8つの番組を候補として選びます

  • and puts them online for free for everyone to watch.

    それから それぞれ1話を オンラインで公開し

  • And so when Amazon is giving out free stuff,

    誰でも見られるようにします

  • you're going to take it, right?

    Amazonが無料で配信すれば

  • So millions of viewers are watching those episodes.

    誰だって見ますよね

  • What they don't realize is that, while they're watching their shows,

    その結果 数百万人が 番組を見ることになります

  • actually, they are being watched.

    ただ視聴者が気付いていないのは 番組を見ている間

  • They are being watched by Roy Price and his team,

    実は自分が見られていることです

  • who record everything.

    ロイのチームは すべてを記録して

  • They record when somebody presses play, when somebody presses pause,

    視聴者を観察します

  • what parts they skip, what parts they watch again.

    いつ再生し いつ一時停止したか どこを飛ばし

  • So they collect millions of data points,

    どこをもう一度見たか 記録するんです

  • because they want to have those data points

    こうして数百万の データポイントを集めます

  • to then decide which show they should make.

    このデータポイントを使って

  • And sure enough, so they collect all the data,

    どの番組を制作するか 決定します

  • they do all the data crunching, and an answer emerges,

    すべてのデータを集めて

  • and the answer is,

    データを分析すると 答えが見えてきました

  • "Amazon should do a sitcom about four Republican US Senators."

    その答えとは

  • They did that show.

    「制作すべき番組は4人の共和党 上院議員が主役のホームコメディである」

  • So does anyone know the name of the show?

    そして制作しました

  • (Audience: "Alpha House.")

    どの番組かわかりますか?

  • Yes, "Alpha House,"

    (観客)『アルファ・ハウス』

  • but it seems like not too many of you here remember that show, actually,

    そう 『アルファ・ハウス』です

  • because it didn't turn out that great.

    でも思い出せない方が多かったのは

  • It's actually just an average show,

    大した番組ではなかったからです

  • actually -- literally, in fact, because the average of this curve here is at 7.4,

    文字通り平均点の番組です

  • and "Alpha House" lands at 7.5,

    このグラフの平均は7.4ですが 『アルファ・ハウス』は7.5でしたから

  • so a slightly above average show,

    まさに普通というか

  • but certainly not what Roy Price and his team were aiming for.

    少しマシな程度の番組です

  • Meanwhile, however, at about the same time,

    当然 ロイ・プライスたちの 狙いとはかけ離れています

  • at another company,

    話かわって 同じ頃

  • another executive did manage to land a top show using data analysis,

    別の会社で

  • and his name is Ted,

    もう一人の重役がデータ分析で ヒット番組を作ろうとしていました

  • Ted Sarandos, who is the Chief Content Officer of Netflix,

    彼の名前は

  • and just like Roy, he's on a constant mission

    テッド・サランドス Netflix社のコンテンツ部門代表です

  • to find that great TV show,

    ロイと同じように 最高の番組を

  • and he uses data as well to do that,

    見つけるのが仕事です

  • except he does it a little bit differently.

    彼もデータを活用しますが

  • So instead of holding a competition, what he did -- and his team of course --

    方法は少し違います

  • was they looked at all the data they already had about Netflix viewers,

    彼のチームは コンテストを開くのではなく

  • you know, the ratings they give their shows,

    Netflixの視聴者に関する 全データを分析しました

  • the viewing histories, what shows people like, and so on.

    番組の評価や視聴履歴

  • And then they use that data to discover

    どんな番組が好まれるか といったデータです

  • all of these little bits and pieces about the audience:

    そして ここから視聴者に関する

  • what kinds of shows they like,

    こまごまとした情報を 探っていくのです

  • what kind of producers, what kind of actors.

    視聴者が好む番組や

  • And once they had all of these pieces together,

    プロデューサー 俳優についてです

  • they took a leap of faith,

    そして情報をすべて組み合わせ

  • and they decided to license

    腹をくくって

  • not a sitcom about four Senators

    ライセンス契約を決めたのは

  • but a drama series about a single Senator.

    4人の上院議員のコメディではなく

  • You guys know the show?

    1人の上院議員が登場する ドラマシリーズでした

  • (Laughter)

    わかりますよね

  • Yes, "House of Cards," and Netflix of course, nailed it with that show,

    (笑)

  • at least for the first two seasons.

    そう『ハウス・オブ・カード 野望の階段』で Netflixは

  • (Laughter) (Applause)

    少なくとも2シーズンは成功しました

  • "House of Cards" gets a 9.1 rating on this curve,

    (笑)(拍手)

  • so it's exactly where they wanted it to be.

    『ハウス・オブ・カード』は 9.1の評価を得ていて

  • Now, the question of course is, what happened here?

    まさに思惑通りです

  • So you have two very competitive, data-savvy companies.

    ここで当然 疑問が湧いてきます

  • They connect all of these millions of data points,

    競争力が高くデータに強い 2つの会社があり

  • and then it works beautifully for one of them,

    どちらも数百万のデータポイントを 組み合わせていますが

  • and it doesn't work for the other one.

    片方は とてもうまくいき

  • So why?

    もう片方は うまくいかない

  • Because logic kind of tells you that this should be working all the time.

    なぜでしょう?

  • I mean, if you're collecting millions of data points

    論理的には常にうまくいくはずです

  • on a decision you're going to make,

    つまり ある決定を下そうとする時に

  • then you should be able to make a pretty good decision.

    データポイントが数百万あれば

  • You have 200 years of statistics to rely on.

    かなりうまくいくはずなんです

  • You're amplifying it with very powerful computers.

    200年の歴史を持つ統計学と

  • The least you could expect is good TV, right?

    高性能のコンピュータが 力を貸してくれます

  • And if data analysis does not work that way,

    平凡な番組に終わるはずなど ないでしょう

  • then it actually gets a little scary,

    ただ もしデータ分析が 思い通りにならなかったら

  • because we live in a time where we're turning to data more and more

    恐ろしいことです

  • to make very serious decisions that go far beyond TV.

    というのも テレビ以外の 様々な重要な決断を下す時

  • Does anyone here know the company Multi-Health Systems?

    ますますデータに頼る時代に 私たちは生きているんですから

  • No one. OK, that's good actually.

    Multi-Health Systems という会社を 知っている方はいますか?

  • OK, so Multi-Health Systems is a software company,

    いませんね よかった

  • and I hope that nobody here in this room

    Multi-Health Systems は ソフトウェア会社ですが

  • ever comes into contact with that software,

    ここに お世話になる人が いないといいですね

  • because if you do, it means you're in prison.

    もし お世話になるとすれば その人は

  • (Laughter)

    受刑者だからです

  • If someone here in the US is in prison, and they apply for parole,

    (笑)

  • then it's very likely that data analysis software from that company

    アメリカで刑務所に入っている人が 仮釈放を申請すると

  • will be used in determining whether to grant that parole.

    許可するかどうかを決めるために この会社のデータ分析ソフトが

  • So it's the same principle as Amazon and Netflix,

    使われる場合が多いんです

  • but now instead of deciding whether a TV show is going to be good or bad,

    AmazonやNetflixと同じ原理ですが

  • you're deciding whether a person is going to be good or bad.

    テレビ番組の良し悪しを 決めるのではなく

  • And mediocre TV, 22 minutes, that can be pretty bad,

    1人の人間の善悪を決めるんです

  • but more years in prison, I guess, even worse.

    22分間 退屈な番組を見るのは 苦痛かもしれませんが

  • And unfortunately, there is actually some evidence that this data analysis,

    さらに数年 刑務所で過ごすのは ずっときついでしょう

  • despite having lots of data, does not always produce optimum results.

    ただ残念なことに データ分析では 大量のデータがあったとしても

  • And that's not because a company like Multi-Health Systems

    常に最適な結果を出せるとは 限らないという証拠があります

  • doesn't know what to do with data.

    これはMulti-Health Systemsなどの企業が

  • Even the most data-savvy companies get it wrong.

    データの扱い方を知らないからではなく

  • Yes, even Google gets it wrong sometimes.

    極めてデータに強い企業でも誤ります

  • In 2009, Google announced that they were able, with data analysis,

    そう Googleさえ 時に間違うんです

  • to predict outbreaks of influenza, the nasty kind of flu,

    2009年 Googleは ある発表をしました

  • by doing data analysis on their Google searches.

    検索データを分析することで 感染力の強いインフルエンザの

  • And it worked beautifully, and it made a big splash in the news,

    流行を予測できたというのです

  • including the pinnacle of scientific success:

    予測は かなりうまくいき 大きなニュースになりました

  • a publication in the journal "Nature."

    科学界 最大の栄誉である

  • It worked beautifully for year after year after year,

    ネイチャー誌への掲載も果たしました

  • until one year it failed.

    予測は翌年も次の年も うまくいっていましたが

  • And nobody could even tell exactly why.

    ある年 失敗しました

  • It just didn't work that year,

    確かな理由は誰にもわかりませんでした

  • and of course that again made big news,

    いきなり失敗したんです

  • including now a retraction

    もちろん これも大きなニュースになり

  • of a publication from the journal "Nature."

    ネイチャー誌の論文も

  • So even the most data-savvy companies, Amazon and Google,

    撤回されました

  • they sometimes get it wrong.

    AmazonやGoogleといった 極めてデータに強い企業でさえ

  • And despite all those failures,

    時に誤るんです

  • data is moving rapidly into real-life decision-making --

    一方 このような失敗にも関わらず

  • into the workplace,

    データは すごいスピードで 日常の意思決定にも

  • law enforcement,

    仕事の場にも 法執行機関にも

  • medicine.

    医療の現場にも

  • So we should better make sure that data is helping.

    入り込んでいます

  • Now, personally I've seen a lot of this struggle with data myself,

    だからデータが本当に 役立っているか 確認すべきです

  • because I work in computational genetics,

    私自身もデータとの格闘を 目の当たりにしてきました

  • which is also a field where lots of very smart people

    私は計算遺伝学を研究していますが

  • are using unimaginable amounts of data to make pretty serious decisions

    この分野でも頭の切れる人たちが

  • like deciding on a cancer therapy or developing a drug.

    想像もつかない量のデータを使って がんの治療や

  • And over the years, I've noticed a sort of pattern

    新薬の開発といった 重大な決断を下しています

  • or kind of rule, if you will, about the difference

    ここ数年 私は データを使った意思決定が

  • between successful decision-making with data

    成功する場合と失敗する場合の間に

  • and unsuccessful decision-making,

    ある種のパターンというか 規則性のようなものが

  • and I find this a pattern worth sharing, and it goes something like this.

    あることに気づきました

  • So whenever you're solving a complex problem,

    このパターンは 伝える価値があると思います

  • you're doing essentially two things.

    複雑な問題を解決する場合

  • The first one is, you take that problem apart into its bits and pieces

    主に2つのことをします

  • so that you can deeply analyze those bits and pieces,

    はじめに 要素を深く分析できるように

  • and then of course you do the second part.

    問題を細かく分割し

  • You put all of these bits and pieces back together again

    それから 次に進みます

  • to come to your conclusion.

    要素を全部 もう一度組み合わせ

  • And sometimes you have to do it over again,

    結論を引き出すんです

  • but it's always those two things:

    同じことを 繰り返す場合もありますが

  • taking apart and putting back together again.

    やることは常に この2つ

  • And now the crucial thing is

    分割し 組み立て直すんです

  • that data and data analysis

    ここで重要なのは

  • is only good for the first part.

    データと その分析が有効なのは

  • Data and data analysis, no matter how powerful,

    最初の部分だけだという点です

  • can only help you taking a problem apart and understanding its pieces.

    データと分析が いかに強力だろうと

  • It's not suited to put those pieces back together again

    役に立つのは 問題を分割して 要素を理解するところまでです

  • and then to come to a conclusion.

    要素を組み立て直して 結論に至るには

  • There's another tool that can do that, and we all have it,

    適していないのです

  • and that tool is the brain.

    私たちには 結論を引き出す 別のツールがあります

  • If there's one thing a brain is good at,

    それは 脳です

  • it's taking bits and pieces back together again,

    脳には得意なことがあります

  • even when you have incomplete information,

    不完全な情報しかない場合でも

  • and coming to a good conclusion,

    要素を組み立てて

  • especially if it's the brain of an expert.

    適切な結論を出すことです

  • And that's why I believe that Netflix was so successful,

    特に専門家の脳は そうです

  • because they used data and brains where they belong in the process.

    Netflixが成功した理由は

  • They use data to first understand lots of pieces about their audience

    データと脳を それぞれ適した場面で 利用したからでしょう

  • that they otherwise wouldn't have been able to understand at that depth,

    まずデータを使って 視聴者に関する情報を理解しました

  • but then the decision to take all these bits and pieces

    そうしなければ そこまで 深く理解できなかったでしょう

  • and put them back together again and make a show like "House of Cards,"

    一方で 要素を全部集めて組み立て直し

  • that was nowhere in the data.

    『ハウス・オブ・カード』のような データからは出てこない

  • Ted Sarandos and his team made that decision to license that show,

    番組を制作しました

  • which also meant, by the way, that they were taking

    ゴーサインを出すと決断したのは テッド・サランドスのチームです

  • a pretty big personal risk with that decision.

    つまり彼らは この決断によって

  • And Amazon, on the other hand, they did it the wrong way around.

    個人的に大きなリスクを負ったのです

  • They used data all the way to drive their decision-making,

    それに対して Amazonは方法を誤りました

  • first when they held their competition of TV ideas,

    意思決定の全過程でデータを使ったのです

  • then when they selected "Alpha House" to make as a show.

    最初に企画コンテストを開いた時も

  • Which of course was a very safe decision for them,

    『アルファ・ハウス』を選んで 制作した時もそうでした

  • because they could always point at the data, saying,

    もちろん これは安全な決断でした

  • "This is what the data tells us."

    だって「データから明らかだ」と

  • But it didn't lead to the exceptional results that they were hoping for.

    言えば済むんですから

  • So data is of course a massively useful tool to make better decisions,

    でも それでは彼らが望む 並外れた成果は上げられませんでした

  • but I believe that things go wrong

    確かに よりよい意思決定には データはとても役立つツールです

  • when data is starting to drive those decisions.

    ただ データが意思決定を

  • No matter how powerful, data is just a tool,

    強いるようになると 問題が起きてくると思います

  • and to keep that in mind, I find this device here quite useful.

    どれほどパワフルだろうと データは単なる道具です

  • Many of you will ...

    それを意識するには この装置が役立つことに気づきました

  • (Laughter)

    納得する人も多いでしょう

  • Before there was data,

    (笑)

  • this was the decision-making device to use.

    データが出現する前は

  • (Laughter)

    意思決定の手段といえば これのことでした

  • Many of you will know this.

    (笑)

  • This toy here is called the Magic 8 Ball,

    知っている方も多いでしょう

  • and it's really amazing,

    これは「マジック8ボール」

  • because if you have a decision to make, a yes or no question,

    本当にすごい装置です

  • all you have to do is you shake the ball, and then you get an answer --

    もしイエスかノーの形で 何か決定しなければならない時

  • "Most Likely" -- right here in this window in real time.

    このボールを振るだけで 答えが出ます

  • I'll have it out later for tech demos.

    「可能性は高い」 こんな風に リアルタイムで出ます

  • (Laughter)

    後でデモ会場に展示しましょう

  • Now, the thing is, of course -- so I've made some decisions in my life

    (笑)