Placeholder Image

字幕表 動画を再生する

  • This strange-looking plant is called the Llareta.

    翻訳: Wataru Narita 校正: Takako Sato

  • What looks like moss covering rocks

    この奇妙な形をした植物はヤレタです

  • is actually a shrub

    岩を覆う苔のように見えるのは

  • comprised of thousands of branches,

    何千という枝でできた

  • each containing clusters of tiny green leaves at the end

    灌木です

  • and so densely packed together

    それぞれの先には小さな緑の葉がかたまりになっていて

  • that you could actually stand on top of it.

    非常に密集しているので

  • This individual lives in the Atacama Desert in Chile,

    その上に立つこともできます

  • and it happens to be 3,000 years old.

    この個体はチリのアタカマ砂漠にあり

  • It also happens to be a relative of parsley.

    樹齢3,000年ほどです

  • For the past five years, I've been researching,

    パセリの近縁種でもあります

  • working with biologists

    この5年間

  • and traveling all over the world

    生物学者たちと共同で研究し

  • to find continuously living organisms

    世界中を回りながら

  • that are 2,000 years old and older.

    2,000年以上生き続けている生命体を

  • The project is part art and part science.

    探してきました

  • There's an environmental component.

    芸術と科学にまたがるプロジェクトです

  • And I'm also trying to create a means

    環境という要素もあります

  • in which to step outside our quotidian experience of time

    日常の時間軸から踏み出し

  • and to start to consider a deeper timescale.

    時間の尺度をより深く考えるための手段を

  • I selected 2,000 years as my minimum age

    作りたいとも思っています

  • because I wanted to start at what we consider to be year zero

    最低でも2,000年としたのは

  • and work backward from there.

    西暦の始まりを開始点として

  • What you're looking at now is a tree called Jomon Sugi,

    そこから遡って行きたかったからです

  • living on the remote island of Yakushima.

    これは縄文杉です

  • The tree was in part a catalyst for the project.

    屋久島という孤島に自生しています

  • I'd been traveling in Japan

    この木がプロジェクトを始めるきっかけの一つになりました

  • without an agenda other than to photograph,

    写真を撮るために

  • and then I heard about this tree

    日本を旅行していた時

  • that is 2,180 years old

    樹齢2,180年だという

  • and knew that I had to go visit it.

    この木のことを聞き

  • It wasn't until later, when I was actually back home in New York

    そこに行かねばと思いました

  • that I got the idea for the project.

    その後ニューヨークの自宅に戻ってから

  • So it was the slow churn, if you will.

    このプロジェクトを思いつきました

  • I think it was my longstanding desire

    ゆっくりと立ち現われてきたのです

  • to bring together my interest

    自らの芸術と科学 そして哲学に対する

  • in art, science and philosophy

    関心を一つにまとめたいと

  • that allowed me to be ready

    私は長いこと願っていました

  • when the proverbial light bulb went on.

    だから ひらめいた時には

  • So I started researching, and to my surprise,

    準備ができていたのです

  • this project had never been done before

    調べ始めると 驚いたことに

  • in the arts or the sciences.

    芸術であれ科学であれ

  • And -- perhaps naively --

    この取り組みは行われたことのないものでした

  • I was surprised to find that there isn't even an area in the sciences

    そして単純にも私は

  • that deals with this idea

    世界中の長寿な種族を扱う

  • of global species longevity.

    科学の分野すらないということに

  • So what you're looking at here

    驚いたのです

  • is the rhizocarpon geographicum, or map lichen,

    今見ているのは

  • and this is around 3,000 years old

    チズゴケです

  • and lives in Greenland,

    3,000年ほど生きています

  • which is a long way to go for some lichens.

    グリーンランドに生えていますが

  • Visiting Greenland was more like

    地衣類にとっては遥か遠い場所です

  • traveling back in time

    グリーンランドを訪れるのは

  • than just traveling very far north.

    極北を旅するだけでなく

  • It was very primal and more remote

    過去への旅行をしているようなものです

  • than anything I'd ever experienced before.

    これまでに訪れた中で

  • And this is heightened by a couple of particular experiences.

    最も原初的で遠い場所でした

  • One was when I had been dropped off by boat

    特別な体験もしました

  • on a remote fjord,

    ボートで遠くのフィヨルドに行って

  • only to find that the archeologists I was supposed to meet

    下ろされた時

  • were nowhere to be found.

    待ち合わせをしていた考古学者が

  • And it's not like you could send them a text or shoot them an e-mail,

    どこにもいませんでした

  • so I was literally left to my own devices.

    SMSやメールを送ることもできません

  • But luckily, it worked out obviously,

    本当に一人ぼっちだったのです

  • but it was a humbling experience

    結局は何とかなりましたが

  • to feel so disconnected.

    取り残されたときは

  • And then a few days later,

    人間の微力さを感じました

  • we had the opportunity to go fishing in a glacial stream

    数日後

  • near our campsite,

    キャンプ近くの氷河から流れる小川で

  • where the fish were so abundant

    釣りをしました

  • that you could literally reach into the stream

    あふれんばかりに魚がいて

  • and grab out a foot-long trout with your bare hands.

    30センチのマスを

  • It was like visiting

    素手で手づかみすることができました

  • a more innocent time on the planet.

    地球が今よりも無垢だった時代を

  • And then, of course, there's the lichens.

    訪れたかのようでした

  • These lichens grow only one centimeter

    そこには地衣類もいました

  • every hundred years.

    100年で1センチしか

  • I think that really puts human lifespans

    育ちません

  • into a different perspective.

    こうした植物を見ると

  • And what you're looking at here

    人間の寿命を新たな視点で考えることができます

  • is an aerial photo take over eastern Oregon.

    今見ているのは

  • And if the title "Searching for Armillaria Death Rings,"

    東オレゴンの上空から撮った写真です

  • sounds ominous, it is.

    「アルミラリアの死環を探して」という見出しは

  • The Armillaria is actually a predatory fungus,

    不気味に感じられます

  • killing certain species of trees in the forest.

    アルミラリアは捕食性のキノコです

  • It's also more benignly known

    ある種の木を殺します

  • as the honey mushroom or the "humongous fungus"

    より温和な言い方をすれば

  • because it happens to be

    「とてつもなく大きなキノコ」として知られています

  • one of the world's largest organisms as well.

    世界最大級の

  • So with the help of some biologists studying the fungus,

    生命体の一つなのです

  • I got some maps and some GPS coordinates

    キノコを研究する生物学者とともに

  • and chartered a plane

    地図とGPSの座標を入手し

  • and started looking for the death rings,

    飛行機をチャーターして

  • the circular patterns

    死環を探し始めました

  • in which the fungus kills the trees.

    アルミラリアが木を殺してできる

  • So I'm not sure if there are any in this photo,

    円形の模様です

  • but I do know the fungus is down there.

    この写真に写っているかはわかりませんが

  • And then this back down on the ground

    地表にはアルミラリアがあります

  • and you can see that the fungus is actually invading this tree.

    地面に行くと

  • So that white material that you see

    アルミラリアがこの木を襲っているのがわかります

  • in between the bark and the wood

    樹皮と木の間に見える

  • is the mycelial felt of the fungus,

    白い物質は

  • and what it's doing -- it's actually

    アルミラリアのフェルト状の菌糸です

  • slowly strangling the tree to death

    水分と栄養分の流れを阻害して

  • by preventing the flow of water and nutrients.

    ゆっくりと木を

  • So this strategy has served it pretty well --

    絞め殺しているのです

  • it's 2,400 years old.

    この戦略はうまく働いてきました

  • And then from underground to underwater.

    これは2,400年も生きています

  • This is a Brain Coral living in Tobago

    地中から海中の話に移ります

  • that's around 2,000 years old.

    トバゴの脳サンゴです

  • And I had to overcome my fear of deep water to find this one.

    2,000年ほど生きています

  • This is at about 60 feet

    深海への恐れを克服して見つけました

  • or 18 meters, depth.

    水深18メートルほどの

  • And you'll see, there's some damage to the surface of the coral.

    ところにあります

  • That was actually caused by a school of parrot fish

    サンゴの表面が傷ついています

  • that had started eating it,

    石鯛の群れが

  • though luckily, they lost interest before killing it.

    食べたのです

  • Luckily still, it seems to be out of harm's way

    死なずに済んだのは幸運でした

  • of the recent oil spill.

    最近起きた石油流出事故の影響も

  • But that being said, we just as easily could have lost

    受けていません

  • one of the oldest living things on the planet,

    とはいえ 地球で最も昔から生きている

  • and the full impact of that disaster

    生命体の一つを簡単に失っていたかもしれないのです

  • is still yet to be seen.

    事故がもたらす災厄の全貌は

  • Now this is something that I think

    まだわかりません

  • is one of the most quietly resilient things on the planet.

    これは地球で最もひっそりと

  • This is clonal colony

    命をつないでいる生き物だと思います

  • of Quaking Aspen trees, living in Utah,

    ユタ州にあるアメリカヤマナラシの

  • that is literally 80,000 years old.

    クローンの集団です

  • What looks like a forest

    8万年も生きてきました

  • is actually only one tree.

    森のように見えますが

  • Imagine that it's one giant root system

    実は1本の木です

  • and each tree is a stem

    一つの巨大な根が張っていて

  • coming up from that system.

    それぞれの木は

  • So what you have is one giant,

    そこから現れた幹なのです

  • interconnected,

    ここにあるのは

  • genetically identical individual

    巨大な一つにつながった

  • that's been living for 80,000 years.

    同一の遺伝子を持つ個体で

  • It also happens to be male

    8万年も生きています

  • and, in theory immortal.

    この木は雄株で

  • (Laughter)

    理論上は不死です

  • This is a clonal tree as well.

    (笑)

  • This is the spruce Gran Picea,

    こちらもクローンの木です

  • which at 9,550 years

    樹齢9,550年ほどの

  • is a mere babe in the woods.

    トウヒですが

  • The location of this tree

    赤ちゃんのようなものです

  • is actually kept secret for its own protection.

    木を守るため

  • I spoke to the biologist who discovered this tree,

    生えている場所は明かされていません

  • and he told me that that spindly growth you see there in the center

    この木を発見した生物学者と話しましたが

  • is most likely a product of climate change.

    真ん中に見える細長い成長部分は

  • As it's gotten warmer on the top of the mountain,

    恐らく気候変動によるものだろうと言っていました

  • the vegetation zone is actually changing.

    山頂が暖かくなってきているため

  • So we don't even necessarily have to have

    植生が変わっています

  • direct contact with these organisms

    植物と直接に接しなくとも

  • to have a very real impact on them.

    被害を及ぼすことは

  • This is the Fortingall Yew --

    可能なのです

  • no, I'm just kidding --

    これはフォーティンゴールのイチイの木です

  • this is the Fortingall Yew.

    冗談です

  • (Laughter)

    こちらがフォーティンゴールのイチイです

  • But I put that slide in there

    (笑)

  • because I'm often asked if there are any animals in the project.

    羊の写真を入れたのは

  • And aside from coral,

    私のプロジェクトに動物はいないのかとよく聞かれるからです

  • the answer is no.

    サンゴを除けば

  • Does anybody know how old the oldest tortoise is --

    動物はいません

  • any guesses?

    最長寿のカメが何歳か知っていますか?

  • (Audience: 300.)

    推測では?

  • Rachel Sussman: 300? No, 175

    (聴衆:300歳)

  • is the oldest living tortoise,

    RS: 300?いいえ 最長寿のカメは

  • so nowhere near 2,000.

    175歳です

  • And then, you might have heard

    2,000年には遠く及びません

  • of this giant clam that was discovered

    アイスランドの浜辺で見つかった

  • off the coast of northern Iceland

    405歳に達する

  • that reached 405 years old.

    しゃこ貝のことを

  • However, it died in the lab

    聞いたことがある方もいるかもしれません

  • as they were determining its age.

    でもこの貝は 研究室で

  • The most interesting discovery of late, I think

    年齢を調べている間に死にました

  • is the so-called immortal jellyfish,

    最近の発見で一番興味深く感じるのは

  • which has actually been observed in the lab

    「不死のクラゲ」とでも言うべきもので

  • to be able to be able to revert back to the polyp state

    成体になった後で

  • after reaching full maturity.

    ポリプ型に戻れることが

  • So that being said,

    研究室で観察されました

  • it's highly unlikely that any jellyfish would survive that long in the wild.

    とはいえ 野生状態で

  • And back to the yew here.

    クラゲがそれ程長生きできるとは思えません

  • So as you can see, it's in a churchyard;

    イチイの話に戻ります

  • it's in Scotland. It's behind a protective wall.

    この木はスコットランドの

  • And there are actually a number or ancient yews

    教会の庭で保護されています

  • in churchyards around the U.K.,

    イギリス各地の教会で

  • but if you do the math, you'll remember

    イチイの古木がたくさん生えています

  • it's actually the yew trees that were there first, then the churches.

    でも計算してみるとわかりますが

  • And now down to another part of the world.

    最初にあったのはイチイで後から教会ができたのです

  • I had the opportunity to travel around the Limpopo Province in South Africa

    別の地域の話に移りましょう

  • with an expert in Baobab trees.

    以前 南アフリカのリンポポ州を旅行する機会がありました

  • And we saw a number of them,

    バオバブの専門家と一緒でした

  • and this is most likely the oldest.

    バオバブを何本も見ましたが

  • It's around 2,000,

    これが一番長寿だと思います

  • and it's called the Sagole Baobab.

    樹齢2,000年ほどです

  • And you know, I think of all of these organisms

    サゴーリ・バオバブと呼ばれています

  • as palimpsests.

    こうした古い木々は全て

  • They contain thousands of years

    歴史の刻印だと思います

  • of their own histories within themselves,

    自らの内に何千年という歴史を

  • and they also contain records of natural and human events.

    刻み込んでいますし

  • And the Baobabs in particular

    自然界や人間界の出来事も記録しています

  • are a great example of this.

    バオバブを見ると

  • You can see that this one

    それがよくわかります

  • has names carved into its trunk,

    このバオバブには

  • but it also records some natural events.

    人間の名前が彫られています

  • So the Baobabs, as they get older,

    自然界の出来事も記録されています

  • tend to get pulpy in their centers and hollow out.

    バオバブは年を取ると

  • And this can create

    中心部がパルプ状になり空洞化します

  • great natural shelters for animals,

    そして動物たちの

  • but they've also been appropriated

    自然の隠れ家になります

  • for some rather dubious human uses,

    怪しげな人間の行為にも

  • including a bar, a prison

    使われてきました

  • and even a toilet inside of a tree.

    バーや刑務所

  • And this brings me to another favorite of mine --

    そしてトイレにまで

  • I think, because it is just so unusual.

    私がもう一つ気に入っている

  • This plant is called the Welwitschia,

    変わった木があります

  • and it lives only in parts of coastal Namibia and Angola,

    ウェルウィッチアという木です

  • where it's uniquely adapted

    ナミビアとアンゴラの一部沿岸のみに自生し

  • to collect moisture from mist coming off the sea.

    海から来る霧の水分を

  • And what's more, it's actually a tree.

    集めるよう順応しています

  • It's a primitive conifer.

    これは実際のところ木なのです

  • You'll notice that it's bearing cones down the center.

    原始的な針葉樹です

  • And what looks like two big heaps of leaves,

    真ん中に果実をつけています

  • is actually two single leaves

    葉っぱが2つの大きな山を作っていますが

  • that get shredded up

    実際は2枚の葉です

  • by the harsh desert conditions over time.

    厳しい砂漠の気候により

  • And it actually never sheds those leaves,

    だんだんと切り裂かれていくのです

  • so it also bears the distinction

    葉を落とすことはないので

  • of having the longest leaves

    最も長い葉を持つ

  • in the plant kingdom.

    植物であるという

  • I spoke to a biologist

    栄誉を手にしています

  • at the Kirstenbosch Botanical Garden in Capetown

    ケープタウンの

  • to ask him

    カーステンボッシュ植物園で

  • where he thought this remarkable plant came from,

    ウェルウィッチアの由来を

  • and his thought was that

    生物学者に尋ねると

  • if you travel around Namibia,

    答えはこうでした

  • you see that there are a number of petrified forests,

    ナミビアに行けば

  • and the logs are all --

    化石化した森がいくつもあり

  • the logs are all giant coniferous trees,

    そこにある丸太はすべて

  • and yet there's no sign of where they might have come from.

    巨大な針葉樹のものだが

  • So his thought was that

    どこから来たのかを示すものは何もない

  • flooding in the north of Africa

    その生物学者の考えでは

  • actually brought those coniferous trees down

    アフリカ北部の洪水が

  • tens of thousands of years ago,

    何万年も前に

  • and what resulted was this remarkable adaptation

    それらの木々を運んできた

  • to this unique desert environment.

    そこから砂漠特有の環境への

  • This is what I think is the most poetic of the oldest living things.

    注目すべき適応が起きたのです

  • This is something called an underground forest.

    長寿生物の中でも最もロマンチックなケースだと思います

  • So, I spoke to a botanist at the Pretoria Botanical Garden,

    これは地底森林と呼ばれるものです

  • who explained that certain species of trees

    プレトリア植物園で ある植物学者が

  • have adapted to this region.

    この地域に適応してきた

  • It's bushfelt region,

    植物があると教えてくれました